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Armstrong State College 

1989-90 Catalog 



A senior residential college in Savannah, Georgia 



Accreditation: Armstrong State College is a senior college in the University System of Georgia. 
It is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. 



Academic Calendar± 



Fall, 1989 Winter, 1990 Spring, 1990 Summer, 1990 

Session I Session II 

(1 1 weeks) (1 1 weeks) (1 1 weeks) (4 & 8 weeks) (4 weeks) 



Freshman Applications Due 


August 30 


December 14 


March 6 


May 30 


June 27 


Registration 


Sept. 18-19 


January 2 


March 26 


June 18 


July 16 


First Day of Classes 


Sept. 20 


January 3 


March 27 


June 19 


July 17 


Mid-Term 


Oct. 24 


Feb. 6 


April 30 


June 29* 
July 16** 


July 27 


Last Day to Withdraw 


Oct. 24 


Feb. 6 


April 30 


June 29* 
July 16** 


July 27 


Advisement & Advanced Registration 


Oct.30-Nov.10 


Feb. 12-23 


May 7-18 


July 16-27 


July 16-27 


Last Day of Classes 


Nov. 30 


March 14 


June 4 


July 13* 
Aug. 10** 


Aug. 10 


Reading Day 


Dec. 1 


March 15 


June 5 






Final Examinations Begin 


Dec. 4 


March 16 


June 6 


July 16* 
Aug. 13** 


Aug. 13 


Final Examinations End 


Dec. 6 


March 20 


June 8 


July 16* 
Aug. 14** 


Aug. 13 


Graduation 


Dec. 8 




June 8 






Holiday 


Nov. 23-24 


January 15 




July 4 




Institutional Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) 


Aug. 26 


Nov. 18 


March 10 


May 26 




Collegiate 
Placement Exam 
(CPE) 


Sept. 12 
Oct. 24 


Dec. 12 
Feb. 6 
March 20 


April 28 
June 11 


July 9 
July 25 
Aug. 6 




College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) 


Oct. 18 


Jan. 17 


April 1 1 


June 13 




Regents' Test Application Deadline 


Oct. 3 


Jan. 16 


April 10 


July 3 




Regents' Test Administrations 


Oct. 23-24 


Feb. 5-6 


Apr. 30 - May 1 


July 23-24 




CHAOS Orientation Sessions 


July 13, 20, 27 
Aug. 3,10 











±AII dates subject to change 
'Session I (4-week term) 
''Session I (8-week term) 



1989 


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Armstrong State College 

1989-90 Catalog 



Contents 



About Armstrong 


3 


The College/City 


9 


Student Life 


15 


Admissions 


21 


Financial Information 


35 


Academic Policies & Information 


45 


Graduate Programs 


63 


School of Arts, Sciences and Education 


75 


School of Health Professions 


193 


Special Programs 


229 


Faculty/Administration 


239 



Index 



251 





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|^sk Me About Armstrong 

Dr ask any of our 3,000 students, "What is college life at Armstrong 
State College really like?" You'll get answers that run the gamut, 
oecause different people are looking for - and find - different things 
in any similar situation. 

As you read this catalog you're already a part of a special group. 
Your future roommates, classmates, and teammates are also 
reading these words as they decide where and how they will spend 
their college years. They, like you, are looking for the real 
Armstrong, the college beyond a beautiful campus, a friendly smile, 
and modern facilities. 

Perhaps it will help, at least a little, if you can see what lies behind 
the words which describe Armstrong. 

. .a belief that quality education today shapes all your 
tomorrows. 

Armstrong has spent its 50-plus year history striving to provide 
quality education beyond all else. Never one to be self-satisfied, 
Armstrong retained its strong liberal arts base as it added career 
programs in education and the health professions. The conviction 
that a truly educated person is one who has knowledge of and 
appreciation for a wide range of subjects still prevails. 

You will spend most of your adult life in the 21st century. You'll be 
called upon to answer questions which haven't yet been asked, to 
work in jobs that don't yet exist, to adapt to a way of life that 
stretches the imagination. Preparation for that life is happening at 
Armstrong. And it's happening today. 




. .Armstrong graduates excel - 
in the job marketplace and in 
graduate school. . 

One reason ASC graduates are 
in demand in the workplace is 
because their education has 
stressed "real world" skills. 
Qualities like critical thinking, 
adaptability, writing and 
speaking and ethical judgments 
are of increasing importance in 
conjunction with learning what 
you need to know to succeed in 
your chosen field. Your 
Armstrong degree is a career 
investment which pays 
handsome dividends. 

If a profession is your goal, you'll want to investigate one of the 
highly successful pre-professional programs in medicine, dentistry, 
veterinary science, forestry, and law. Armstrong graduates often 
elect to further their career goals through graduate study. In fact, a 
full 40 percent of all Armstrong graduates in chemistry have entered 
graduate school (20 percent in the medical field). 





. .our faculty stacks up with the best . 

Whatever their field, Armstrong professors are serious about helping 
their students learn. Perhaps that's why you'll frequently find faculty 
and students head-to-head over coffee, a special project or the 
latest headlines. 

Your classes will be small, usually no more than 30 students, so you 
and your instructor get to know each other well. Maintaining a 17:1 
student/faculty ratio is important at Armstrong. 

Armstrong faculty stay equally 
involved in their academic 
disciplines. Research and 
publishing flourish in the 
teaching staff, where doctorates 
predominate. That's another 
"plus" at Armstrong - you won't 
be lectured by a teaching 
assistant, even in the most basic 
courses. 

. .more than 75 majors/ 
programs in the arts and 
sciences, teacher education 
and the health professions. 

Armstrong State College is a multi-purpose institution of higher 
education. That means you have a wide choice of majors that will 
lead to a successful career and a bright future. 

While a liberal arts core curriculum forms the basis for all Armstrong 
degrees on the associate and baccalaureate levels, you will find 
ample opportunity to realize your career goals and to broaden your 
educational horizons through academic concentrations, minors, 
internships, and co-op programs. 

The quality teacher education program relies heavily on this arts 
and sciences base and adds professional courses to prepare 
dedicated teachers for future generations. 

Engineering studies is a rapidly expanding program at Armstrong. 
Today's technological advancements keep job demand high. 
Students can complete two years of study, including basic 
engineering courses, at Armstrong through the Regents 
EngineeringTransfer Program before completing degree 




requirements at Georgia Tech, or they can elect to earn dual- 
degrees from Armstrong State College and one of five regional 
schools of engineering. 

Graduates in the School of Health Professions, a regional health 
education center, find ready employment in the rapidly expanding 
health career fields. Pass rates of graduates who take national and/ 
or state licensing exams approach 100 percent. 

. .students span a broad range in age, a mix which brings 
richness to the classroom. 




A substantial number of 
Armstrong students are over 22 
years of age. You'll be as likely 
to share classes with a typical 
18-year old freshman or a younc 
mother as a business person or 
a senior citizen. Education is a 
common bond and mature 
experiences and viewpoints 
often add another dimension to 
discussions. 





. .the best of both worlds - 
friendly, personal campus life 
in an urban Savannah setting. 

College life at Armstrong is 
many things. Boring isn't one of 
them. Whether you love sailing 
with the ocean breeze and salt 
spray in your face or paddling 
silently as you canoe the 
beautiful Ogeechee river, water 
sports abound. In fact, sunny 
skies and year-round shirt sleeve 
weather mean students spend a 
lot of time outdoors. Even many 
of historic Savannah's special 
festivals, symphony concerts, 
and jazz outings are held under 
the sun or stars. And, if you've 
never spent St. Patrick's Day on 
River Street, you've missed a 
never-to-be-forgotten 
experience. 



*** 
















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You'll gain personal and 
professional insights as yoi 
"find yourself." You'll 
approach your future with 
the confidence of the well- 
prepared. And you'll make 
lifelong friendships 
strengthened by shared 
memories. 



Come on! 
Experience life at 
Armstrong, 




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The City/College 


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You'll gain personal and 
professional insights as you 
"find yourself." You'll 
approach your future with 
the confidence of the well- 
prepared. And you'll make 
lifelong friendships 
strengthened by shared 
memories. 



Come on! 
Experience life at 
Armstrong. 



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The City/College 



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10 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



History of the College 

Armstrong State College, a senior unit of the 
University System of Georgia, was founded in 
1 935, as Armstrong Junior College, to help meet 
the needs for college level educational oppor- 
tunities in the community. The college, as es- 
tablished by the City's Mayor and Aldermen, 
was housed in the beautiful Armstrong home, a 
gift to the city from the family of George F. Arm- 
strong. Over the years the college occupied five 
additional buildings in the Forsyth Park and 
Monterey Square areas. In 1959, as Armstrong 
College of Savannah, it became a two-year unit 
of the University System. The Board of Regents 
conferred four-year status on Armstrong in 1964 
and the college moved to its present 250 acre 
site, a gift from the Mills B. Lane Foundation, in 
December of 1965. Additional buildings joined 
the eight original structures as Armstrong added 
professional and graduate programs and tripled 
in size. 

The Fine Arts Center, including a 1 ,000 seat 
theatre/auditorium, the Health Professions Build- 
ing, a new apartment style residence complex, 
a library wing, and an academic computing cen- 
ter are among more recent additions. 

Armstrong State College, offers over 75 ac- 
ademic programs and majors in the School of 
Arts and Sciences, and Education and the 
School of Health Professions. 

The academic community includes approxi- 
mately 3000 students and 139 full-time faculty 
members. Armstrong State College was fully ac- 
credited as a senior institution by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools in Decem- 
ber, 1968, with accreditation retroactive to Jan- 
uary 1, 1968, and was last reaccredited in 
December 1982. 

Purpose 

Armstrong State College, a senior college in 
the University System of Georgia, provides a 
range of strong academic programs and an en- 
vironment for intellectual and cultural growth in 
the arts and sciences, education, and health 
disciplines. The College pursues its purpose by 
promoting the free exchange of ideas in a variety 
of undergraduate and graduate programs lead- 
ing to degrees at the Associate, Baccalaureate, 
Master's, and specialist levels. The College pro- 
vides non-degree programs and activities 
through the Coastal Georgia Center for Contin- 
uing Education. 



Instruction 

Through instruction, the College ensures that 
students read and write effectively, and, through 
a strong liberal arts core curriculum, promotes' 
the acquisition of knowledge in humanities, 
mathematics, the natural sciences, and the so- 
cial sciences. The College prepares students at 
the graduate and undergraduate levels in the 
methods of scholarly inquiry, scientific research, 
and problem solving, and, in the process, en- 
courages student commitment to learning and 
to physical, emotional, and social development. 
Furthermore, the College helps students to iden- 
tify goals and the means of achieving them, as 
well as to understand and to respect people 
from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Addi- 
tionally, it broadens the base of educational op- 
portunities for students through formal and 
informal arrangements with other colleges and 
universities. 

Faculty, Students, and Staff 

The College recruits and retains faculty who 
are able teachers, supportive of its academic 
purpose, and who are professional sources of 
knowledge and expertise. It seeks, recruits, and 
retains students whose records indicate a like- 
lihood of success, and creates a community of 
learners in which a sense of mutual trust and 
respect is evident. It encourages and supports 
an active intellectual, cultural, and social life on 
campus. In addition, the College recruits and 
retains a well-trained staff, sensitive to the needs 
of those it serves and committed to supporting 
its academic purpose. 

Administration 

The administration ensures equal opportunity 
and access to employment, admissions, and 
programs and services of the College without 
regard to age, sex, race, national origin, color, 
religion, or physical handicap. It encourages 
faculty research and development, and pro- 
vides an environment which enables faculty 
members to participate in the search for knowl- 
edge. It secures and manages funds necessary 
to maintain the College's academic programs, 
library, and support services. Furthermore, the 
administration provides systems of campus 
governance which are responsive to the con- 
cerns of students, faculty, staff, and the Board 
of Regents. And finally, it acquires and maintains 
facilities and equipment necessary to support 
the College. 



PROGRAMS 



11 



Community Service 

A regional resource for information and ex- 
>ertise, the college is responsive to the unique 
;ducational and community service needs of its 
:onstituency. By combining efforts with the com- 
nunity, the college designs and conducts con- 
inuing education programs and offers a variety 
)f cultural and athletic events. Moreover, it lib- 
jrally shares its physical facilities and grounds 
or the betterment of the academic and cultural 
ife of the community. 

.ocation 

Armstrong students find much to enjoy about 
iving in the cosmopolitan city of Savannah, the 
najor urban area (pop. 200,000) in coastal 
Beorgia. The college's 250 acre campus is lo- 
oted in a residential area of the city which pro- 
notes a feeling of freedom and security on 
:ampus. 

Savannah, Georgia's founding city, has all the 
Historic and cultural variety of a metropolitan city 
yvith the added advantage of the ocean at its 
jack door. A temperate climate encourages out- 
door activities and recreation year round. Beach 
and river outings include sailing, boating, water 
skiing, sunning and beachcombing. Golf, ten- 
nis, fishing and hunting are also popular. 

A resident symphony orchestra, dance and 
theatre groups, and visiting entertainment 
groups regularly perform at the Civic Center. 
Special celebrations and other festivals are 
scheduled throughout the year. 

The historic past lives in harmony with today's 
progress in Savannah. As a living laboratory for 
history, Savannah is unsurpassed yet the Sa- 
vannah port is one of the busiest on the Atlantic 
coast. 

Community oriented leisure activities comple- 
ment on-campus happenings. A growing NCAA 
intercollegiate athletic program, active intra- 
murals, concerts, plays and special entertain- 
ment mean lots to do without leaving campus. 

Accreditation 

Armstrong State College has earned the fol- 
lowing regional and special purpose accredi- 
tations: 

Armstrong State College - by the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Schools for the pe- 
riod 1982-1992. 
Associate Degree Nursing - by the National 
League for Nursing for the period 1 985-1 993. 



Baccalaureate Degree Nursing - by the National 
League for Nursing for the period 1 985- 1 993 

Criminal Justice - by the Criminal Justice Ac- 
creditation Council for the period 1981-1991 

Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Accred- 
itation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Edu- 
cational Programs for the period 1985-1990. 

Medical Technology - by the Committee on Al- 
lied Health Education and Accreditation for 
the period 1985-1990. 

Music - by the National Association of Schools 
of Music for the period 1984-1990. 

Radiologic Technologies - by the Committee on 
Allied Health Education and Accreditation for 
the period 1987-1990. 

Respiratory Therapy Department - by the Com- 
mittee on Allied Health Education and Ac- 
creditation for the period 1987-1992. 

Teacher Education Programs - by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education for the period 1982-1989. 

Development Activities 

The Office of Development promotes funding 
for college programs from sources supplemen- 
tal to state appropriations and student fees. The 
college participates in federal and other grant- 
supported activities, and seeks assistance from 
alumni and friends. Gifts from private sources 
are accepted for various purposes such as ath- 
letics, instructional equipment, library books, 
matching funds for grants, scholarships and 
other restricted purchases. Unrestricted contri- 
butions are disbursed at the president's discre- 
tion. Gifts of any size can be used to add to the 
library collection in the name of an individual or 
agency. The Vice President for Student Affairs 
and Development can provide further informa- 
tion to any prospective donor. 

Alumni Association 

The Armstrong State College Alumni Associ- 
ation was established in 1937 and is comprised 
of over 6,500 ASC graduates. Membership in 
the Association is open to all graduates and for- 
mer students. The Association promotes fellow- 
ship among alumni, students, faculty, staff, and 
friends of the College in order to strengthen the 
ties between the alumni, the College, and the 
community. 

Each year, an increasing percentage of the 
Association's budget provides scholarships for 
outstanding Armstrong students During the 
spring, the Association awards a full academic 



12 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



scholarship to an entering freshman. In addition, 
the Alumni Association also awards seven par- 
tial scholarships to deserving ASC students. 

During the June commencement ceremony, 
the Association presents the Distinguished Cit- 
izen Award and the Outstanding Faculty Award. 

Annual alumni activities include: Armstrong 
Fest, homecoming, the annual meeting, and 
graduation receptions. The Outstanding Alumni 
Service Award and the Distinguished Alumni 
Award are presented as a part of homecoming 
activities. 

FOCUS, the campus/alumni newspaper, is 
published twice a year. Alumni are encouraged 
to submit information for inclusion in FOCUS. 

The Director of Alumni Affairs can provide ad- 
ditional information about alumni membership 
and activities. 

Two- Year Degree Programs 

The following two-year degrees are offered as 
preparation for higher degrees in the liberal arts 
and professions or as terminal professional de- 
grees: 
Associate of Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Jus- 
tice 
Associateof Applied Science in Early Childhood 

Education 
Associate of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate of Science in Nursing 
Associate of Science in Radiologic Technolo- 
gies 
Associate of Science in Respiratory Therapy 

Four- Year Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of art, drama- 
speech, English, history, music, political sci- 
ence, and psychology. 

Bachelor of General Studies. 

Bachelor of Health Science. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, 
chemistry, computer science, criminal justice, 
and mathematical sciences. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors 
in Early Elementary Education; Middle School 
Education; and Secondary Education in teach- 
ing fields of Art Education, Biology Education, 
Broad Field Social Studies, Business Education; 
(cooperative arrangement with Savannah State 
College), Chemistry Education, English Educa- 
tion, General Science Education, Industrial Arts 



Education (cooperative arrangement with Sa- 
vannah State College), Mathematics Education, 
Music Education, Physics Education, Social Sci- 
ence Education (with concentrations in history, 
and political science), Trade and Industrial Ed- 
ucation (cooperative arrangement with Savan- 
nah State College), and Speech Correction. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Edu- 
cation. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

The College is authorized to offer Teacher Ed- 
ucation programs, preparing students for cer- 
tification by the Georgia State Department of 
Education in the following areas: art, biology, 
business education, chemistry, early elementary 
education, English, general science, history, in- 
dustrial arts, library media, mathematics, middle 
school education, music, physics, political sci- 
ence, social studies, trade and industrial edu- 
cation. 

Graduate Programs 

The college offers a variety of master's and 
education specialist degree programs. Details 
are provided in the "Graduate Programs" sec- 
tion of this catalog. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Armstrong State College offers courses ap- 
propriate for the first two years of baccalaureate 
programs such as business, engineering, for- 
estry, industrial management, pharmacy, physi- 
cal therapy, physics, etc., not offered among its 
degree programs, and it offers the pre-profes- 
sional study appropriate for dentistry, law, medi- 
cine, veterinary medicine, and other profes- 
sional fields. 

Regents Engineering Transfer 
Program 

Qualified students seeking a bachelor of en- 
gineering degree may begin their college stud- 
ies at Armstrong State College through the 
Regents Engineering Transfer Program. Upon 
successful completion of the pre-engineering 
curriculum, students may transfer to the Georgia 
Institute of Technology to complete the degree 
requirements. It is expected that students in this 
program, like other Georgia Tech graduates, will 
normally require four to five and one-half years 
to complete the degree requirements, depend- 



PROGRAMS 



13 



ing on their pre-college preparation, involve- 
ment in extra-curricular activities, and 
engineering major. 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Armstrong State College has dual-degree 
programs in engineering with the Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology, Auburn University, Clemson 
University, Mississippi State University, and the 
University of Florida. Upon completion of the first 
three years of academic work at Armstrong, the 
student may enroll for two subsequent years at 
one of the participating schools. Upon com- 
pleting the requirements of the two cooperating 
schools, the student will receive a baccalau- 
reate degree from Armstrong State College and 
a baccalaureate degree in the chosen field of 
engineering from the second school. 

Dual-degree programs in other fields are also 
available. At the Georgia Institute of Technology, 
candidates from Armstrong State College are 
eligible to seek any degree offered in the sci- 
ences, mathematics, and management, as well 
as engineering. The Head of the Department of 
Chemistry and Physics is the Armstrong Coor- 
dinator of these dual-degree programs and 
should be contacted for additional information. 

A dual-degree program in forestry and envi- 
ronmental management with Duke University is 
available. Students complete three years of ac- 
ademic work at Armstrong State College, then 
enroll for two subsequent years at Duke Uni- 
versity. Students who successfully complete the 
program receive a B.S. in biology from Arm- 
strong State College and a M.S. in either forestry 
or environmental management from Duke Uni- 
versity. The Head of the Department of Biology 
should be contacted for additional information. 

Cooperative Education 
Program 

Armstrong State College has initiated a co- 
operative program in connection with its Engi- 
neering Studies Program. Opportunities are 
available in some other disciplines as well. Co- 
operative education students alternate quarters 
between college and work. The cooperative pro- 
gram offers students practical experience as 
well as financial assistance in the form of com- 
pensation from the firms that employ them. 

Students interested in applying for admission 
to the cooperative education program should 
contact the Coordinator of Cooperative Educa- 



tion, Dr. Henry Harris, Head of the Department 
of Chemistry and Physics. 

Evening Courses 

A wide selection of evening undergraduate 
and graduate level courses accommodate stu- 
dents who are employed during the day. Eve- 
ning courses are scheduled to enable evening 
students to complete degree requirements in a 
variety of fields. 

Off Campus Courses 

Armstrong State College offers selected 
courses at the Coastal Georgia Center for Con- 
tinuing Education each quarter. In addition, 
courses are taught at Memorial Medical Center, 
Savannah Vocational Technical School and 
other city sites on demand. Armstrong State par- 
ticipates in a consortium of state colleges that 
offers baccaulaureate degree programs at 
Brunswick College, in Brunswick, Georgia. 

General Studies 

Associate and baccalaureate programs in 
general studies emphasize a liberal arts edu- 
cation and allow students to acquire a broad- 
based background in the arts and sciences. 
These degrees are particularly attractive to stu- 
dents who desire the general intellectual growth 
which comes with a multi-disciplinary degree. 

Coastal Georgia Center for 
Continuing Education 

The Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing 
Education was established in 1979 to combine 
the resources of Armstrong State College's 
Community Services Division and Savannah 
State College's Extended Services Division. The 
Center operates a unified continuing education 
program dedicated to serving the people of Sa- 
vannah, Chatham County, the State of Georgia 
and, for some programs, persons beyond those 
boundaries. 

A wide variety of programs is offered at Arm- 
strong State College, Savannah State College. 
the Downtown Center and, when it is appropri- 
ate, at job sites, schools, community centers, 
and other locations in Savannah. Instructors are 
drawn from the faculties of both institutions, from 
qualified experts in the Savannah community, 
and from consultants throughout the region. 



14 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



On the Armstrong campus, the major com- 
munity services/continuing education compo- 
nent of the college is the short-course/ 
conference program. This unit administers non- 
degree courses, conferences, and seminars de- 
signed for area residents who do not wish to 
participate in the regular credit classes offered 
by the college. These' activities vary widely — 
some are related to professional development, 
others reflect personal interests, while others are 
recreational in nature. The Registrar maintains 
permanent records of persons participating in 
activities that meet certain criteria. 

Regional Criminal Justice 
Training Center 

The Armstrong State College Regional Crim- 
inal Justice Training Center is a regional training 
site for criminal justice employees. The region 
consists of nine counties; however, training is 



made available to all criminal justice employees 
throughout the State of Georgia. The basic mis- 
sion of the Center is to provide certification 
classes for law enforcement and jail officers. In 
addition, there are numerous advanced and 
specialized courses for higher certification cred- 
its. The training center has four full-time staff 
members and a large part-time instructor cadre. 

Armstrong State/ 

Savannah State 

Cross Enrollment Program 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College 
or at Armstrong State College as a full-time stu- 
dent has the privilege of taking one course with 
his Dean's approval at the other college without 
paying an additional fee. A student may obtain 
in the Office of the Registrar the proper form for 
permission to register for courses at Savannah 
State College. 




Student 
Life 



16 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Student Life 

One of the primary aims of the educational 
mission at Armstrong State College is the total 
development of students. This growth process 
is enhanced by integrating opportunities for so- 
cial, emotional, cultural, physical and spiritual 
development in addition to intellectual growth. 
The Office of Student Affairs is committed to 
providing programs and services which foster 
an educational environment which will assist stu- 
dents in achieving their full potential. The college 
encourages learning through involvement in the 
residence center, student government, campus 
organizations, intramurals, and more. 

Residence Life and Food 
Service 

The residence center, completed in Septem- 
ber of 1985, consists of three buildings which 
house 64 students each. The apartment-style 
design encourages student interaction without 
a loss of privacy. Each two-bedroom suite, ac- 
commodating four students, has a bath and liv- 
ing room. All units are fully furnished, carpeted, 
and have unit-controlled heat and air condition- 
ing. Phone jacks and an on-site coin laundry are 
added conveniences. Several units are 
equipped to accommodate handicapped stu- 
dents. The residence complex is staffed by a 
head resident and resident assistants. These 
students are chosen on the basis of leadership 
and willingness to serve their fellow students. 

Students who live in college housing are re- 
quired to participate in the 15-meal plan pro- 
vided in the Memorial College Center. The plan 
includes three meals per day, Monday through 
Friday. Limited meals are available on the week- 
end. The meal plan is also available for students 
who do not choose to live in college housing. 

Housing applications and/or specific infor- 
mation should be requested from the Office of 
Admissions or the Director of Housing. 

Student Involvement 

The Orientation Program is designed to pro- 
mote social and academic adjustment of new 
students and transfer students. CHAOS (Com- 
munication, Help, Advisement, Orientation and 
Service) provides freshmen with the information, 
services and support essential to a successful 
transition into the Armstrong community. Partici- 
pants in these one day summer CHAOS ses- 



sions receive individual attention from studen 
leaders and staff as they acquire first hand ex 
perience with- academic advising, registration 
campus facilities, student activities, college poli 
cies and procedures. The CHAOS program is c 
cooperative effort of Student Leaders and col 
lege staff. Competitive selection of student lead 
ers occurs annually during Spring Quarter 
Inquiries concerning CHAOS should be ad 
dressed to the Office of Student Affairs. An ab 
breviated orientation program is scheduled fo 
students new to the college prior to registratior 
Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters. 

The Student Government Association is the 

official governing body of the students at Arm 
strong State College. It assists in formulating i 
program of student services and activities, anc 
it strives to express the will of the majority o 
students and to provide experience in demo 
cratic living. All students are automatically mem 
bers of the SGA and are entitled to vote in SG/ 
elections. Qualified students may seek positions 
of leadership in the Student Government As 
sociation by running for office during the Sprinc 
or Fall elections. 

Student Clubs and Organizations provide 
Armstrong State College students with oppor 
tunities to develop leadership skills, broader 
their social and professional backgrounds, anc 
make a significant contribution to the college 
and the community. They reflect the natural va 
riety of interests found in a diverse student body 
Religious: Baptist Student Union. 
Greek: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority, and Ph 

Mu Sorority. 
Professional: American Chemical Society 
ASC Engineering Society, Association fo 
Computing Machinery, Data Processing 
Management Association, Georgia Asso 
ciation of Nursing Students, James Moore 
Wayne Law Club, Jr. American Dental Hy 
gienists Association, Medical Technology 
Student Association, Music Educators Na 
tional Conference, Radiologic Technology 
Association, National Society of Profes 
sional Engineers, Respiratory Therapy As 
sociation, and The E. B. Twitmeyer Society 
(Psychology). 
Special Interest: Band, Cheerleaders, Cho 
rus, International Students Association 
Masquers, Vocal Ensemble, and Women o 
Worth (WOW), Marauders (Military Sci 
ence), College Young Republicans, anc 
the ASC Soccer Club. 



STUDENT LIFE 



17 



Academic Honor Societies recognize and 
encourage superior scholarship in many fields 
of study. Campus chapters include: Beta Beta 
Beta (Biology), Joel H. Hildebrand Honor Soci- 
ety (Chemistry), Kappa Delta Pi (Education), Phi 
Alpha Theta (History), Phi Eta Sigma (Scholastic 
for freshmen), Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics), and 
ASC/GSC Nursing Honor Society. 

Student Publications provide opportunities 
for students to develop skills in creative writing, 
reporting, photography and design. The Gee- 
chee (yearbook), Inkwell (newspaper) and Cal- 
liope (literary magazine) are all produced by 
students under the supervision of approved col- 
lege advisors. They are financed primarily by 
the Student Activity Fund 

Intramural and Recreation Offerings. The 

college places a high priority on its intramural 
and recreational offerings and provides a wide 
variety of activities including organized com- 
petitive sports. The physical education complex 
includes an indoor oiympic-size pool, gymna- 
sium and weight room. Outdoor facilities for ten- 
nis and field sports are adjacent. 

The Intercollegiate Athletics Program at 

Armstrong is affiliated with the National Colle- 
giate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II. 
Athietic scholarships are available to support 
student-athletes who participate in the intercol- 
legiate program The men's athletic teams con- 
sist of basketball, baseball, tennis, and cross 
country. Women's teams include tennis, swim- 
ming, volleyball, and basketball. Cheerleaders 
are also sponsored by the Athletic Department. 
Armstrong State College is unaffiliated with an 
athletic conference. 

Cultural Opportunities on campus and off 
are an important aspect in the total educational 
process. Nationally known speakers, contem- 
porary concerts, dances, popular films, exhibits 
and performances by outstanding classical and 
modern artists from around the world comple- 
ment the student's general education. These 
programs are selected and coordinated by the 
College Union Board. Student dramatic, choral, 
and instrumental groups, under professional di- 
rection, have established distinguished tradi- 
tions. On-campus offerings, such as the Faculty 
Lecture Series, broaden knowledge and interest 
in a non-classroom setting. The 1,000 seat fine 
arts auditorium often hosts performances by the 
Savannah Symphony, area arts groups, and out- 
of-town troupes, such as the National Shake- 
speare Company and the Vienna Choir Boys 



Student Services 

The Counseling Center serves all students ' 
who are concerned about achieving educational 
and occupational goals and resolving personal 
problems. Counselors offer individual confer- 
ences to students who seek help in choosing a 
major, setting career goals, studying, and deal- 
ing with academic demands or conflict with fam- 
ily or friends. Counselors give tests to measure 
interest and ability, provide information to ex- 
plore education and work opportunities, and in- 
struct students on the use of computerized 
career and study skills development programs 
In addition, counselors often are able to provide 
information about college policies, curriculum, 
and campus resources. 

Tests of interests, values, and abilities are 
available to students through counseling serv- 
ices. In addition, the following testing programs 
are administered by the counseling staff: Col- 
lege-Level Examination Program (CLEP), 
DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST), 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Medical 
College Admission Test (MCAT), Miller Analo- 
gies Test (MAT), National Teacher Examinations 
(NTE), Regents' Testing Program and Veterinary 
Aptitude Test (VAT). Other testing programs 
about which information is available include the 
Dental Admission Test (DAT), Graduate Man- 
agement Admission Test (GMAT), Law School 
Admission Test (LSAT), Optometry Admission 
Testing Program and Pharmacy College Admis- 
sion Test. 

Career Planning and Placement Services 

provides assistance with all aspects of career 
development. Students can get help with the 
early stages of career development such as se- 
lecting an academic major, gathering occupa- 
tional information and investigating career paths 
through individualized career counseling and 
computerized career guidance techniques. Ex- 
periential opportunities such as part-time and 
temporary employment are coordinated by the 
office staff. Students closer to graduation may 
take advantage of one-on-one instruction and 
workshops for resume writing, interviewing skills 
and job search strategies. Job listings, referrals 
and on-campus interview services are also 
available to students and alumni registered with 
the office All seniors are strongly urged to reg- 
ister with the office at least three quarters prior 
to graduation to establish a placement file and 
become eligible for placement services 



18 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Veterans will find the Office of Financial Aid 
and Veterans Affairs helpful in advising about 
admissions procedures and services available 
to them. 

Handicapped Students are provided with 
needed services on an individual basis. After 
students are accepted to the college, if they 
have special needs as a result of a physical 
disability, they should plan to set up an appoint- 
ment in the office of student affairs to discuss 
their disability as it relates to their educational 
program. The college counselors and the vice 
president for student affairs will then attempt to 
provide services so that each handicapped 
student has a positive educational experience 
at Armstrong State College. 

The Minority Advisement Program helps 
minority students develop interest in all facets 
of college life. A peer advisor offers one-on-one 
assistance to students in adjusting to personal 
and academic life on campus. In addition, so- 
cial, cultural and educational activities designed 
to broaden all students' knowledge of Black 
people and their contributions to society are pre- 
sented. 

The Adults Back to College Program meets 
the special needs and concerns of the non-tra- 
ditional student. Mature students who are be- 
ginning college or are returning after several 
years away will find that the A. B.C. program will 
ease their transition to student life and address 
their career and academic questions. 

The Academic Computing Center houses 
separate minicomputer and microcomputer 
facilities for student use. The minicomputer lab 
has a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/750 
and 6 SUN Microsystems 3/60 workstations, all 
running the UNIX operating system. The micro 
area features AT&T, Zenith PCs, Apple Macin- 
tosh computers and an Apple LaserWriter 
printer. All machines in the Academic Comput- 
ing Center are connected to the campus wide 
network and allow access to file servers and 
other network services. There is also a separate 
Engineering micro computer' lab with high per- 
formance Zenith color workstations and a Hewlitt- 
Packard high speed pen plotter. 

The Writing Center is a place where students 
in all disciplines may come for help with their 
writing. Tutors in the Writing Center offer indi- 
vidual instruction in basic writing skills and pro- 
vide guidance in the preparation of essays, 
reports, and research papers. The aim of the 



Writing Center is not only to assist students in 
core composition courses, but also to work with 
faculty to improve writing across the curriculum. 
The center is administered by the Department 
of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Lane Library, built in 1966 and substantially 
enlarged in 1975, supports the academic pro- 
grams of Armstrong State College. To that end, 
library faculty provide individual assistance in 
using library resources as well as course-inte- 
grated instruction in the classroom. The tradi- 
tional repository role of academic libraries is 
enchanced through computer-assisted data- 
base searching, compact disc information sys- 
tems, and a sizeable collection of non-print 
materials. The library is open over 80 hours 
weekly during academic sessions. 

The library collections consist of more than 
650,000 total items, including 1 46,000 book vol- 
umes, 453,000 microforms, and 35,000 records, 
slides, motion picture kits, and videotapes. In 
addition, subscriptions are maintained to ap- 
proximately 800 periodicals and newspapers. 
The Florence Powell Minis Collection contains 
college archives, materials of local color, and 
first editions by Conrad Aiken and other Savan- 
nah authors. 

Lane Library employs state-of-the-art tech- 
nology to improve its services and operations. 
Cataloging and inter-library loan service are ac- 
complished through membership in a national 
bibliographic utility, the Online Computer Li- 
brary Center (OCLC), which makes the re- 
sources of other libraries available to the 
Armstrong community. Reference services are 
enhanced through computerized bibliographic 
searching utilizing DIALOG Information Serv- 
ices, Inc., which offers over 300 databases to 
augment the library's resources. Audio-visual 
production facilities further enhance library serv- 
ices. 

Library programs at Armstrong seek to meet 
the needs of each student in the course of study 
while also preparing graduates for life-long 
learning. 

The Book Store is the source of all required 
textbooks and course-related supplies. It also 
offers general supplies and a selection of im- 
printed apparel and gift items. 



STUDENT LIFE 



19 



Marking Regulations 

All vehicles driven on campus should display 
i college parking decal on the left rear bumper. 
"ree decals are available at the Security Office 
>n Science Drive. 

All students, faculty, and staff are encouraged 
o become aware of the parking regulations. A 
,et of regulations may be picked up in the Se- 
:urity Office or Office of Student Affairs, and they 
ire published in Students Illustrated. 





20 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 












Admissions 



22 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



General Admission Policies 

Armstrong State College welcomes students 
who wish to pursue a college-level program of 
study. Applicants must provide evidence of a 
reasonable possibility of academic success in 
college in order to be admitted as a regular stu- 
dent. Applicants who do not meet the minimum 
requirements for admission may be admitted un- 
der conditional or provisional status, or under 
other special categories described below (see 
PP 25). 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to 
employ appropriate assessment mechansims to 
ascertain the suitability of applicants to enroll in 
the college and to deny enrollment or admisson 
to individuals based upon the results of the as- 
sessment. 

Admission Requirements 

The following items are required off all appli- 
cants: 

1 . A completed Application for Admission 
- Forms are available from the Admis- 
sions Office. 

2. Official high school and/or college tran- 
scripts - Transcripts must be submitted 
directly to Armstrong State College by 
the high school or college. See Special 
Admissions section for exceptions. 

3. Official scores on the Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance 
Examination Board or the American Col- 
lege Testing Program (ACT). Applica- 
tions and information may be obtained 
from the College Entrance Examination 
Board (Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey, 
08540), or the American College Testing 
Program (3355 Lenox Road, N.E., Suite 
320, Atlanta, Georgia, 33026-1332). An 
Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(ISAT) is offered quarterly through the 
Counseling and Placement Office. ISAT 
scores can be used only for admission 
to Armstrong State College. Exceptions 
to the SAT requirement are discussed 
in the Special Admissions section. 

4. Other requirements - The College may 
require any applicant to appear for a 
personal interview and to take any 
achievement, aptitude and psychologi- 
cal tests it deems appropriate in order 
to make a decision regarding the ap- 



plicant's general qualification for admis- 
sion to the College. 

Final acceptance or rejection of each appli- 
cant is determined by the Director of Admissions 
and is subject to the applicant's right of appea 
to the Academic Standing Committee prior tc 
the beginning of the desired quarter of entry 
The committee will review the appeal and make 
a recommendation to the President of the Col- 
lege, who will render a decision. The College 
reserves the right to withdraw admission prioi 
to or following enrollment if the student becomes 
ineligible as determined by the standards of the 
College or Board of Regents. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right tc 
refuse to accept any or all of the credits frorr 
any high school or other institution, notwith 
standing its accredited status, when the College 
determines through investigation or otherwise 
that the quality of instruction at such high schoo 
or institution is, for any reason, deficient or un 
satisfactory. The judgment of the College on thfe 
question shall be final. 

The College reserves the right to reject ar 
applicant who is not a resident of the State o 
Georgia. All students enrolled at Armstrong 
State College are required to affirm that they wil 
abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 

Admission of Recent High 
School Graduates 

An applicant must be a graduate of an ac 
credited high school. Students graduating frcn 
high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, mus 
meet the requirements of the College Prepara 
tory Curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents 
Students who lack required courses in any c 
the five areas must make up the deficiencie: 
according to established guidelines. The follow 
ing high school courses are minimum require 
ments for regular admission: 



Units 


Instructional 




Emphasis/ 




Courses 


English (4) 


*Grammar and usage 




*Literature (Americar 




and World) 




'Advanced composi 




tion skills 


Science (3) 


*Physical Science 




*At least two laboraton 




courses from Biology 




Chemistry or Physics 



ADMISSIONS 



23 



lathematics (3) *Two courses in Alge- 

bra and one in Ge- 
ometry 

ocial Science (3) 'American History 

*World History 
'Economics and 
Government 

oreign Language (2) *Two courses in one 
language emphasiz- 
ing speaking, (must 
be listening, reading 
and writing) 

The minimum regular admission requirements 
) Armstrong State College are a combined SAT 
core of at least 750 (with a score of not less 
nan 350 on the verbal section and 350 on the 
lath section individually, or an ACT composite 
core of not less than 16 (with a score of not 
>ss than 16 on the English section and 11 on 
ie math section individually). Also a minimum 
.0 grade point average on all academic 
ourses is required. All of the academic courses 
omputed in the high school grade point aver- 
ge will have been taken in grades 9-12. 

Provisional Admission 

Applicants to the College who do not meet the 
College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) will be 
onsidered for provisional admission to the Col- 
3ge. The following represents the College's cri- 
3ria for provisional admission: 

inglish - Students graduating with iess than the 
our required units of English will be required to 
ake the Collegiate Placement Examination 
CPE) in English and Reading. Based on the 
student's score, the student would (1) exempt 
Developmental Studies English and/or Reading, 
x (2) be placed in Developmental Studies Eng- 
ish and/or Reading. 

Mathematics - Students graduating with less 
nan the three required units of mathematics will 
De required to take the Collegiate Placement 
Examination (CPE) in mathematics. Based on 
he student's score, the student would (1) ex- 
empt Developmental Studies mathematics, or 
[2) be placed in Developmental Studies math- 
ematics at the appropriate level. 

Science - Students graduating with less than the 
three required units of science will be required 
to take an additional five quarter hour (for credit) 
course in a laboratory science. 



Social Science - Students graduating with less 
than the three required units of social science 
will be required to complete one additional five 
quarter hour (for credit) course chosen from ap- 
proved social science courses. 

Foreign Language - Students graduating with 
less than the two units of the same foreign lan- 
guage will be required to complete one addi- 
tional five quarter hour (for credit) introduction 
foreign language course. 

All course work required as a result of a de- 
ficiency must be taken immediately. In the areas 
of social science, science, and foreign lan- 
guage, the student will be required to complete 
the appropriate course with a "C" grade or bet- 
ter. Students will receive credit for courses used 
to satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum defi- 
ciencies, but such credit may not be used to 
satisfy core curriculum or degree requirements. 

Exceptions to the CPC 
Requirement 

1 . Any applicant who graduated from high 
school prior to Spring of 1988 is exempt 
from CPC requirements. 

2. An applicant applying for any associate 
of applied science degree program of- 
fered by Armstrong State College is ex- 
empt from the CPC requirements. 

Conditional Admission 

An applicant who qualifies for admission to 
the College but who does not qualify for regular 
admission will be granted conditional admis- 
sion. A student is conditionally admitted to the 
College if the SAT score is less than 750 or any 
part of the SAT score (verbal or math) is less 
than 350. A student is conditionally admitted to 
the College if the ACT Composite score is less 
than 16 or ACT English is less than 16, or ACT 
Math is less than 11. An applicant who scores 
less than 250 verbal or 280 mathematics on the 
SAT (less than 10 on the ACT English or less 
than 5 on the ACT math) and has less than a 
1.8 high school grade point average on all ac- 
ademic courses will be denied admission to the 
College. 

All conditionally admitted students must take 
the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) m 
order to qualify for regular admission This ex- 
amination should be taken before the student's 



24 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



first registration at the College. If a conditionally 
admitted student fails to take the CPE before 
registering, the choice of courses (until the test 
is taken) will be limited by the student's SAT or 
ACT scores. 

Any student placed in a course numbered be- 
low 100, either by therr SAT (or ACT) scores, or 
by their CPE scores, will be considered a con- 
ditionally admitted Developmental Studies stu- 
dent. 

Any other courses taken prior to completing 
and passing appropriate parts of the CPE must 
be approved by the Developmental Studies 
Counselor or by an advisor within that depart- 
ment. 

A student in the Developmental Studies Pro- 
gram must have a schedule of classes approved 
by the Counselor in Developmental Studies, or 
an advisor within that department each time the 
student registers. 

Conditionally admitted student will exit De- 
velopmental Studies in the following ways 

1. Passing all required parts of the Colle- 
giate Placement Examination. 

2. If any required part of the CPE is not 
passed, the student will be required to 
enroll in the appropriate Developmental 
Studies course. Upon successful com- 
pletion of all required Developmental 
Studies courses and passing the CPE, 
the student will exit Developmental 
Studies. 

A student in Developmental Studies will be 
given four quarters per area to successfully exit 
that area. A student failing to exit an area after 
four attempts will be subject to Developmental 
Studies suspension. Copies of the policies of the 
Developmental Studies Program may be ob- 
tained from the Developmental Studies Office. 

Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College will grant up to one- 
fourth of the credit required in a college degree 
for satisfactory scores on the following exami- 
nations: 

Advanced Placement 

English Literature & Composition 

Calculus AB 

Calculus BC 

Chemistry 

American History 

European History 



ATP Achievement Tests 

American History 

European History 
College-Level Examination Program 

College Composition 

Analysis and Interpretation of 
Literature 

Humanities 

College Algebra 

College Algebra-Trigonometry 

Calculus with Elementary Functions 

Western Civilization I 

Western Civilization II 

American Government 

American History I 

American History II 

Introductory Sociology 

College French 

College German 

College Spanish 

Natural Sciences 
DANTES Subject Tests 

Astronomy 

Criminal Justice 

General Anthropology 
Academic departments select the examination 
and determine passing scores. The colleg 
credit awarded is the same as that earned b 
students who complete the equivaler 
course(s). The letter-grade "K" is used to identif 
credit by examination and has no effect on th 
academic grade point average. The Office ( 
the Registrar adds courses and credit earne 
to the academic records of enrolled students 

For additional information, please make ir 
quiry to the Office of the Registrar/Director i 
Admissions, the Office of Counseling and Plac< 
ment, or the head of the appropriate academ 
department. 

College Credit for Military 
Experience and Training 

Students who wish to have their military e> 
perience and training evaluated for college 
credit should submit a copy of appropriate form 
to the Registrar's office. Veterans should subm 
DD Form 214 and active duty military person™ 
should submit DD Form 295. Active duty Arm 
personnel and soldiers discharged since 0( 
tober 1, 1986, should also provide the Registry 
with a copy of their Army/American Council o 
Education Registry Transcript. 



ADMISSIONS 



25 



tegents Engineering Transfer 
rogram 

To be admitted to the Regents Engineering 
ansfer Program at Armstrong State College, 
udents must have achieved at least: 
1. 550 on the mathematics portion of the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); and 

1. 450 on the verbal portion of the SAT; and 
3. 3.0 high school grade point average. 
This institution's faculty members have 
orked closely with Georgia Tech's faculty to 
jsure a curriculum which is well-coordinated 
ith that of Georgia Tech. Specific times each 
jarter have been established for students to 
sit the Georgia Tech campus and meet with 
;presentatives of their anticipated major. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program stu- 
erts who satisfactorily complete the pre-en- 
■neering curriculum and apply for transfer will 
9 accepted to Georgia Tech. However, admis- 
on to the most popular majors, as for other 
eorgia Tech students, will be based upon over- 
I grade point average, performance in the re- 
uired prerequisite courses and availability of 
udent spaces. 

Requirements of Transfers 

1.. Transfer students completing high school 
in the Spring of 1988, or later, from non- 
University System institutions will be re- 
quired to submit their high school tran- 
scripts as part of their application process 
unless they have completed their freshman 
and sophomore years, completed an as- 
sociate degree, or have more than 90 hours 
of transfer credit approved. This require- 
ment also applies to students enrolled in 
University System programs that do not re- 
quire the College Preparatory Curriculum 
for admission. 

2. Transfer students completing high school 
in the Spring of 1988, or later, transferring 
from University System institutions will 
maintain their CPC status as determined by 
the first University System institution mak- 
ing the original CPC evaluation. 

3. Transfer applicants completing high school 
prior to Spring of 1988 will follow the same 

' procedure as freshman applicants except 
these applicants will not be required to 
meet the College Preparatory Curriculum 
requirements. In addition, these applicants 
who have achieved sophomore standing at 



the time of entrance, will not be required to 
submit their high school records. Such rec- 
ords may be required by the Office of Ad- 
missions, but normally the transcripts of 
previous college records will suffice in 
place of the high school record. Transfer 
applicants must ask the Registrar, of each 
college they have previously attended, to 
mail an official transcript of their records to 
the Office of Admissions at Armstrong State 
College, regardless of the transferability of 
the credits. 

4. Transfer applicants will not be considered 
for admission unless he/she is academi- 
cally eligible to return to the college or uni- 
versity last attended, or unless the officials 
of the institution last attended recommend 
the applicant's admission. 

5. Transfer applicants will be considered for 
admission to Armstrong State College, if, 
on all work attempted at other institutions, 
their academic performance as shown by 
their grade-point-average is equivalent to 
the minimum standard required by Arm- 
strong State College students by compa- 
rable standing. Students not meeting the 
required GPA may be admitted on Good 
Standing, with Warning. (See chart under 
Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy 
in the "Academic Regulations" section of 
this Catalog.) 

6. Credit will be given for transfer work in 
which students received a grade of "C" or 
above. Credit will also be given for transfer 
work in which the students received grades 
of "D", with the limitation that such credit 
will not exceed twenty-five percent of the 
total amount of credit accepted with grades 
of "C" or above. College credit will not be 
allowed for such courses as remedial Eng- 
lish or remedial mathematics or courses 
basically of secondary school level. 

7. Credits earned at an institution which is not 
a member of the appropriate regional ac- 
crediting agency can be accepted on a 
provisional basis only. Students transfer- 
ring from an institution which is not a mem- 
ber of a regional accrediting agency must 
achieve a "C" average on their first fifteen 
quarter hours of work at Armstrong in order 
to be eligible to continue. In certain areas 
they may be required to validate credits by 
examination. In computing cumulative 
grade averages, only the work attempted 
at Armstrong will be considered. 



26 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



8. The amount of credit that Armstrong will 
allow for work done in another institution 
within a given period of time may not ex- 
ceed the normal amount of credit that could 
have been earned at Armstrong during that 
time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours may 
be transferred from a junior college. At least 
half of the courses in the major must be 
taken at Armstrong. 

9. Not more than one-fourth of the work 
counted toward a degree may be taken 
through correspondence extension 
courses or examination. No correspon- 
dence courses may be used to meet re- 
quirements in the major field or the related 
field for the bachelor's degree. No corre- 
spondence course may be taken while en- 
rolled at Armstrong State College without 
prior approval of the Vice President and the 
head of the department in which the student 
is majoring. Correspondence credit will not 
be accepted for courses in English com- 
position of foreign language. 

1 0. If the Core Curriculum requirements in Area 
I (Humanities), Area II (Sciences), and/or 
Area III (Social Sciences) have been com- 
pleted in a University System of Georgia 
institution, each completed area will be ac- 
cepted as having met the respective area 
requirement at Armstrong State College. 

11. An official evaluation of all previous college 
credit earned will be done during the first 
quarter of the applicant's attendance. 
Transfer credit will be awarded from insti- 
tutions listed in the American Association 
of College Admission Officers and Regis- 
trars as being fully accredited. 



Readmission 

Students who have not been enrolled at Am 
strong during the current academic year (th 
academic year begins with the Fall Quarte 
must apply for readmission on a form provide 
by the Office of The Registrar. Former studen 
who have not attended another college sine 
leaving Armstrong may be readmitted, provide 
they are not on suspension at the time they wis 
to reenter. Former students who have attende 
another college since leaving Armstrong mu 
meet requirements as listed in the catalog 
effect at the time of return. A student who 
readmitted after an absence from the college f< 
more than two years must meet degree requin 
ments as listed in the bulletin in effect at the tirr 
of his or her return. 



Transient Students 

Students enrolled in another college or ur 
versity may apply for temporary admission 
Armstrong State College. They must have wr 
ten approval from their Dean or Registrar th 
they are in good standing and have permfssic 
to take specific courses at Armstrong State Cc 
lege to be transferred to their own institutic 
when satisfactorily completed. Transient st 
dents are admitted for a specific period of tim 
normally one quarter. If they wish to remain 
Armstrong State College longer than one quart 
they must submit additional statements fro 
their Dean or Registrar, or must meet all requir 
ments for regular admission as a transfer st 
dent. 



Developmental Studies 
Transfer Student Policy 

Conditionally admitted transfer students must 
meet the same admission requirements as in- 
dividuals admitted to the College for the first 
time. A complete record of the student's past 
remedial coursework and CPE scores must be 
on file in the Armstrong State College Registrar's 
Office before the student can be admitted. Fur- 
ther, conditionally admitted transfer students 
must be eligible to return to their previous insti- 
tutions before they will be considered for ad- 
mission to Armstrong State College. 



Armstrong Students 
Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong students who wish to take cours 
work at another college with the intent of appl^ 
ing the courses to their academic record at Arrr 
strong may do so in accordance with regulation 
for transient status to another college. Studer 
must meet the requirements stipulated by th 
other college, and, in order to apply the credit 
toward their academic records at Armstrong 
must meet the academic regulations of Arrr 
strong. Consult with the Registrar's Office fc 
details. 



ADMISSIONS 



27 



Accelerated Program for 
High School Students 

Through this program for superior high school 
5eniors, students may complete more than two- 
hirds of the freshman year of college before 
oegmning a regular college career. Students ac- 
:epted into the program may choose any fresh- 
nan course provided they meet course 
Drerequisites and receive permission from their 
ligh school principal or counselor and their col- 
ege advisor. 

Students in this program may enroll for college 
credit in a maximum of two courses each quarter 
A/hile completing their senior year of high school. 
Jpon graduation from high school, the student 
/vill be admitted as a regular college enrollee. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program 
f they receive a college course grade below C 
)r their high school average in academic 
:ourses falls below B in any quarter. 

The College will consider students for this pro- 
gram only upon written recommendation of their 
nigh school principals or counselors. 

To be admitted to the program, students must 
satisfy all of the following criteria: 

1 . Written recommendation by the principal or 
counselor of the high school; 

2. Written consent of parent or guardian (if the 
student is a minor); 

3. Completion of the eleventh grade in an ac- 
credited high school; 

4. A combined verbal and mathematics SAT 
score of no less than 1 ,000, or ACT Com- 
posite no less than 24; 

5. A minimum high school grade-point-aver- 
age on all academic courses of 3.0; 

6. Completion of the University System of 
Georgia's College Preparatory Curriculum 
(CPC) requirements with the following ex- 
ceptions 

(a) Students with an SAT verbal score of 
at least 450 (or ACT English of at least 
21) who have not completed the final 
unit of high school English and/or so- 
cial studies will be permitted to fulfill 
these high school requirements with 
the appropriate college courses. 

(b) Students who have not completed the 
College Preparatory Curriculum re- 
quirements may be admitted through 
the joint enrollment program (see be- 
low) if they are enrolled in the neces- 
sary high school courses and 



scheduled to complete the require- 
ments by the end of their senior year. 
With the exception of English and social 
studies courses taken by students with the 
required SAT or ACT score, a college 
course may not be used to fulfill both high 
school College Preparatory Curriculum re- 
quirements and college degree require- 
ments. 

Early Admission and Joint 
Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College offers an early ad- 
mission program for those students who have 
completed the eleventh grade in high school 
and who have demonstrated outstanding aca- 
demic potential. The criteria for admission to this 
program are the same as those listed for the 
Accelerated Program. 

Additionally, the college offers a joint enroll- 
ment program which is an early admissions pro- 
gram allowing students to enroll full time at the 
College while remaining on the rolls of a local 
high school. After successfully meeting all es- 
tablished criteria for the Accelerated Program, 
students will be awarded high school diplomas 
at the end of their freshman year in college. For 
further information on this program, prospective 
applicants should consult with their high school 
counselors and request information from the Of- 
fice of Admissions. 

Special Admission Categories 

GED 

An applicant who is not a high school grad- 
uate may be considered for admission based 
upon completion of the General Education De- 
velopment Examination (GED) with a score that 
satisfies the minimum requirement of the State 
of Georgia (standard score-45). A score report 
must be submitted directly to the College from 
the GED testing center where the student took 
the test, or by DANTES (2318 South Park Street, 
Madison, Wisconsin, 53713) if the student took 
the test through the United States Armed Forces 
Institute while in military service. If the appli- 
cant's high school class graduated in the Spring 
of 1988 . or later, then all College Preparatory 
Curriculum (CPC) requirements must be met 
The only exception to this requirement will be 
those applicants who will be pursuing an as- 
sociate degree. These individuals are exempt 
from the CPC requirements. 



28 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Delayed Admission 

Applicants who have not attended high school 
or college within the previous five years, and 
have earned fewer than 20 transferable quarter 
hours of college credit, are not required to take 
the SAT or ACT admissions test. However, these 
applicants will be required to take the Collegiate 
Placement Examination and complete any De- 
velopmental Studies requirements. Student ad- 
mitted under this category must complete 30 
hours of college credit with a minimum 2.0 grade 
point average in order to be granted regular 
admission status. 

Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 

Persons who are 62 years of age, or older, 
may enroll as regular students in credit courses 
on a "space available" basis without payment 
of fees, except for supplies, laboratory or special 
course fees. They must be residents of the State 
of Georgia and must present a birth certificate 
or comparable written documentation of age to 
enable the Admissions Office to determine eli- 
gibility. They must meet all admission and de- 
gree requirements. 

International Students 

(All students who are citizens of countries other 
than the U.S.) 

It is recommended that international students 
begin their attendance at the college in the Fall 
Quarter. The college also recommends that in- 
ternational students attend an ELS language 
center prior to enrollment. 

Students from a country other than the United 
States who are interested in attending Arm- 
strong must meet the following requirements be- 
fore application is made: 

1. Meet the requirements of freshman appli- 
cants. International students must have 
completed the equivalency of a U.S. high 
school. However, College Preparatory Cur- 
riculum (CPC) requirements do not apply 
to these students. 

2. Have an official transcript of academic rec- 
ords mailed to the Office of Admissions at 
Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. If SAT or ACT scores are available, ask that 
the results be sent to Armstrong. If these 
scores are not available, the student will be 
required to take the Collegiate Placement 
Examination and take any such required 
coursework in accordance with the Devel- 
opmental Studies Guidelines. 



4. A student whose native language is not 
English must take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score a 
minimum of 500 for consideration for ad-j 
mission to the College. 

5. Submit a statement of financial resources 
prior to attendance. 

6. Show proof of adequate health and life in- 
surance. 

After completion of application form and sum 
mission of all required records, the College will 
make a decision on the application. If an applii 
cation is approved, the College will send an I- 
20 form (which the international student will usq 
to obtain a student visa). Upon arrival these stu- 
dents may be tested in English composition for 
class placement purposes. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong 
State College and upon, receipt of Certificatior 
of eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans. 
Administration, veterans may attend under Pub 
lie Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Ac 
of 1966), Public Law 815 (disabled), Public Lav 
894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans) 
or Public Law 631 (children of permanently dis 
abled veterans). Students under Public Law; 
358, 361 , 634 should be prepared to pay tuitior 
and fees at the time of registration. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 
Applicants 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocations 
Rehabilitation or other community agencie 
must apply at least six weeks before the begir 
ning of any quarter to insure proper processing 
of applications. 



Requirements for Admission 
to Fine Arts Programs 

The college-level study of art and music. re 
quires considerable background as well as i 
basic proficiency level. Those students wh| 
wish to major in art are expected to show th«' 
faculty a portfolio of previous work in at least 
one medium. In music, placement examination 
are required of all entering students in mush 
theory and applied music. 



ADMISSIONS 



29 



equirements and 
rocedures for Admission 
> Health Programs 



chool of Health Professions 
tatement of Professional Standards 
elated to Applicants and Students 

All applicants to and students enrolled in the 
:hool of Health Professions must meet and 
)ntinue to meet the approved professional 
andards of the School and respective pro- 
ams. 

I. In order to meet the intellectual, physical 
and social competencies necessary to 
meet professional requirements, all appli- 
cants and students must be able to exhibit 
qualities of good judgment, mental strength 
and emotional stability. 
I No applicant who may jeopardize the 
health and/or the well being of a patient, 
client, co-worker, or self, may be accepted 
into the School of Health Professions pro- 
gram or continue as a student within a pro- 
gram. 
3. The individual programs will inform each 
applicant in writing of the standards which 
are related to the professional duties of the 
discipline. 
t. The faculty of each program or department 
shall be responsible for applying the stan- 
dards for their students and prospective 
students. 
5. In all cases, final appeal may be brought 
to the attention of the Dean of Health Profes- 
sions who would appoint an Appeals com- 
mittee. 

isurance 

Because of contractual requirements, Health 

isurance is required of students in Associate 

jegree Nursing, Baccalaureate Degree Nurs- 

j g, Medical Technology, Radiologic Technol- 

nies and Respiratory Therapy. Malpractice/ 

lability insurance is required of students in 

ssociate Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate De- 

ree Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical Tech- 

ology, Radiologic Technologies and 

Respiratory Therapy. 



Associate Degree Nursing 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not in any way guarantee formal admission to 
the Associate Degree Nursing Program It is 
important that the applicant for admission to this 
program file all papers required at least two 
quarters prior to the quarter in which the appli- 
cant wishes to begin nursing courses. 

The Admissions Committee of the Department 
of Associate Degree Nursing will act only on 
completed applications. Admission decisions 
will normally be made in October for winter 
quarter, January for spring quarter, and April for 
fall quarter. After admission to the program, the 
student must pay a $50.00 non-refundable 
Health Professions Deposit to reserve a seat in 
the program. This deposit is applied to the stu- 
dent's first quarter matriculation fee. Students 
who qualify for admission but who are not ad- 
mitted because of lack of space may reapply 
for the following quarter's class. Students ad- 
mitted for a given quarter must enter the pro- 
gram during that quarter or reapply for 
admission for any subsequent quarter. Deter- 
mination of admission to the program is a func- 
tion of the faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the criteria for 
admission to the Department of Associate De- 
gree Nursing as stated. Credit for nursing and 
science courses taken prior to application to the 
program must be approved by the Department 
of Associate Degree Nursing. It is recom- 
mended that nursing courses not be over one 
year old and science courses not be over five 
years old. Students wishing to be given credit 
for nursing courses which are over one year old 
and science courses which are over five years 
old may be required to validate current knowl- 
edge by examination or be required to repeat 
these courses. 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is ap- 
proved by the Georgia Board of Nursing and is 
fully accredited by the National League for Nurs- 
ing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing 
Program is made on a space available basis 
and is limited to the best qualified students as 
determined by the Associate Degree Nursing 
faculty. Admission criteria include: 



30 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



1 . Completion of ZOO 208 with a grade of "C" 
or better. 

2. Completion of CHE 201. 

3. Completion of MAT 101. 

4. Eligibility for ENG 101. 

5. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Associate De- 
gree Nursing Program within three consecutive 
academic years from the date of their initial entry 
into the program. Students who do not complete 
the program within this time limit must reapply 
for admission, meet current criteria for admis- 
sion, and have their previous credits evaluated 
at the time of their subsequent admission. Stu- 
dents who are readmitted must meet course re- 
quirements in effect at the time of their 
readmission. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmis- 
sion application for Armstrong State Col- 
lege and the Department of Associate 
Degree Nursing. 

2. The student will be required to meet ad- 
mission and curriculum requirements in ef- 
fect at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's readmission will be based 
upon space availability and recommenda- 
tion by the Department of Associate Degree 
Nursing. 



Baccalaureate Nursing 
Department 

Applicants to the program must be regularly 
admitted to Armstrong State College prior to 
making application to the nursing major. Stu- 
dents must meet the admission requirements of 
the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing to be 
eligible for admission to the nursing major. Ad- 
mission to the nursing major is the function of 
the Faculty. Only completed applications will be 
considered. 

Students will be admitted to the nursing major 
during Winter Quarter, Sophomore year. Stu- 
dents who are not admitted may reapply when 
they meet admission criteria. 

Applicants may address the Head of the De- 
partment of Baccalaureate Nursing if they re- 
quire additional information concerning 
admission procedures. 



The Bachelor of Science degree program ii 
approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing anc 
is fully accredited by the National League fo 
Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission criteria include: 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State Co 
lege. 

2. A minimum SAT verba! score of 350. 

3. A minimum SAT mathematics score of 35C 

4. A verbal/mathematics combined SAT of nc 
less than 750. (SAT scores will not be re 
quired for those applicants with Associate 
Bachelor's or Master's Degrees). 

5. A grade of "C" or better in each scienc 
course. 

6. An adjusted GPA of 2.5 in all prerequisit 
course work attempted. . 

Transfer Applicants and those with degree 
in other fields must meet the criteria establishe 
for admission to the nursing major. Transfe 
credit will be awarded depending upon equi\ 
alency of courses. These decisions will be de 
termined by the Nursing Faculty who will us 
actual course outlines, descriptions, etc., sur. 
plied by the student. 

Registered Nurse applicants must meet th 
criteria established for admission to the nursin 
major and must also submit proof of licensure 

Program Completion Requirements 

Students must complete the Baccalaureai 
Nursing Program within four consecutive yeai 
from the date of their initial admission to tl" 
nursing major. Students who do not comple" 
the program within this time limit must apply f< 
readmission, meet current criteria for admissioi 
and have their previous credits evaluated. Sti 
dents who are granted readmission must me< 
course requirements in effect at the time of reac 
mission. 

Senior nursing students are required to tal< 
a written comprehensive exam prior to gradi 
ation. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmi 
sion application for Armstrong State Cc 
lege and the nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet a< 
mission and curriculum requirements in e 
feet at the time of readmission. 



ADMISSIONS 



31 



3. The student's admission will be based upon 
space available and recommendation by 
the Admissions Committee of the Depart- 
ment of Baccalaureate Nursing. 

4. Students who have been dismissed are in- 
eligible for readmission. 



associate Degree Dental 
lygiene 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
Dt in any way guarantee admission to the As- 
xiate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. Ap- 
licants must first be accepted for admission to 
ie College with regular admission status before 
le Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee eval- 
ates the applicant's application to the Asso- 
iate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. 

Admission to the program is limited in each 
lass. Students matriculate in the Fall Quarter of 
ach year. Applications for admission should be 
ompleted as soon as possible for the Fall 
uarter and must include a transcript of all ac- 
demic work. 

Because of the heavy emphasis on science 
i the dental hygiene curriculum, it is important 
lat the applicant have a strong foundation in 
iology and chemistry. 

Applicants who are on academic probation or 
uspension from another college will not be con- 
idered for admission to the program. Unless 
pecifically approved by the Head of the de- 
artment, credit will not be accepted for courses 
aken in another school of dental hygiene. 

Applications for admission should be clearly 
larked "For Dental Hygiene Only." 

Applicants may contact the head of the De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene if they require ad- 
itional information concerning admission 
>rocedures. 

After admission to the Dental Hygiene Pro- 
iram, the student must pay a $50.00 non-re- 
jndable Health Programs Deposit to reserve a 
eat in the program. This deposit is applied to 
~ie student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Dental Hy- 
)iene major is on a space available basis and 
3 limited to the best qualified students as de- 
ermined by the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee. Regular admission criteria include: 



1 . A 2.5 or better high school grade-point av- 
erage. 

2. An SAT score (composite verbal and math- 
ematics) of 750 or above. 

3. A grade-point-average of 2.0 on all pre- 
vious college work, if applicable. Students 
transferring from another college must have 
this average to be considered for admis- 
sion. The 2.0 average must be maintained 
to date of actual matriculation in the pro- 
gram. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee 
will give special consideration to applicants who 
have completed one year of college work and 
who have completed CHE 201 or ZOO 208 (or 
their equivalents) with a grade of "C" or better. 
Conditional admission criteria include: 

1. Conditional Admissions status may be 
granted to an applicant when the applicant 
does not meet the regular admissions cri- 
teria. 

2. An expressed interest in being admitted to 
the Associate in Science Dental Hygiene 
Program as evaluated by the Admissions 
Committee must be demonstrated. 

The conditionally admitted student must have 
a G.P.A. of 2.0 at the conclusion of the first year 
in the program. 

The applicant should request a personal in- 
terview with the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee to discuss the application after all 
credentials have been received. 

Readmission Procedures 

Students who have been admitted to and have 
enrolled in the Associate Degree Program in 
Dental Hygiene, but who have either withdrawn 
or have been dropped from the program, may 
apply for readmission to the program only if they 
have a cumulative college GPA of 2.0 at the time 
they wish to reenter. The student's readmission 
will be based upon space available and rec- 
ommendation by the Dental Hygiene Admis- 
sions Committee. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Dental Hygiene Education 

Candidates for the program must be gradu- 
ates of accredited associate degree dental hy- 
giene programs and licensed as registered 
dental hygienists. 



32 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Students begin their course of sequenced 
dental hygiene courses in the Fall Quarter. Ap- 
plication for admission should be completed as 
soon as possible. 

Transfer credits are accepted for courses 
other than the professional sequence. A mini- 
mum of 45 quarter hours must be earned at 
Armstrong State College for the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence Degree in Dental Hygiene Education to be 
a awarded from this institution. The Office of the 
Registrar will evaluate all transfer credits. 

Applications for admission should be clearly 
marked "For Dental Hygiene Only". 

Applicants may contact the Head of the De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene at Armstrong State 
College if they require additional information 
concerning admission to the program. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. One year of professional experience pre- 
ferred. This may include any dental-related 
work experience. 

2. A minimum 2.0 GPA on all previous college 
work. Students transferring from another 
college must have this average to be con- 
sidered for admission. The 2.0 average 
must be maintained to date of actual ma- 
triculation in the program. 

How to Apply 

1 . Complete all application forms required for 
admission to Armstrong State College. 
Mark the application For Dental Hygiene 
Only. These forms are to be returned to the 
Office of Admissions. 

2. Complete the Dental Hygiene Bachelor of 
Science Application Form and return to the 
Department with a recent photograph. 

3. Submit National Board Scores to the De- 
partment of Dental Hygiene. Applicants 
should contact the head of the Department 
of Dental Hygiene if they require additional 
information. 



Associate Degree 
Respiratory Therapy 

Admission to Armstrong State College does 
not guarantee admission to the Respiratory 
Therapy Department. The department has a 



separate formal admissions process in additior 
to the admission process to Armstrong State 
College. 

Students are admitted to the program durinc 
the Fall quarter. The application process begins 
during the Winter break preceding the desirec 
admission date. Deadline for complete appli 
cations is, June 1 . Applications received afte 
that date will be considered on a first come-firs 
serve, space-available basis. 

To meet contractual obligations with the din: 
ical affiliates, the program requires students tc| 
submit a complete health history form and evi 
dence of liability (malpractice) insurance priol 
to participation in clinical practicums. 

Applications for admission should be clearH 
marked "For Respiratory Therapy Only." Applij 
cants may address the Head of the Respirator 
Therapy Department if they require additions 
information concerning admissions procedures 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State Co 
lege. 

2. Good standing with college at the time c 
student selection. 

Readmission to the 
Program 

Students who have been admitted to and ha\ 
enrolled in the Associate Program in Respirato 
therapy but who have either withdrawn or ha\ 
been suspended from the program may app 
for readmission provided they are in good a* 
ademic standing at the time they wish to reente 

A student who has been dismissed from th 
program for any reason will not be eligible f< 
readmission. 



Associate Degree Radiologic 
Technologies Program 

Admission to Armstrong State College do<; 
not guarantee admission to the Radiologic Tec- 
nologies Program. The Program has a separa* 
formal admissions process in addition to the a> 
mission process to Armstrong State College. 

Students are normally only admitted to tl 
professional component of the program at tl 
start of the Fall Quarter each year except If 
transfer students. Students may start taking cc* 



ADMISSIONS 



33 



Durses at any time and need not have com- 
eted the core courses prior to entry into the 
-ofessional component. The application proc- 
5S begins in the Winter quarter of the year pre- 
ous to desired admission. Qualified applicants 
ill be considered on a first come-first admitted, 
Dace available basis. 

To meet contractual obligations with the clin- 
al affiliates, the program requires students to 
jbmit a complete health history form, evidence 
health insurance, and evidence of liability 
nalpractice) insurance prior to participation in 
mical practicums. 

Applications for admission should be clearly 
larked "For Radiologic Technologies Only." 
pplicants may address the Head of the Radio- 
■gic- Technologies program if they require ad- 
itional information concerning admissions 
rocedures. 

riteria for Admission 

The actual determination of admission of ap- 
licants to the program is a function of the 
adiologic Technologies Program Admissions 
ommittee. Admissions are competitive in na- 
ire and based on scholastic history, work ex- 
erience, personal references, and a personal 
rterview. 

The following are specific criteria for admis- 
ion: 

1. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in a high school 
curriculum. 

2. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all science and 
mathematics courses in the high school 
curriculum. 

3. A minimum overall adjusted college GPA 
of 2.0, if applicable. 

4. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in all mathematics 
and science courses at the college levels. 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for 
idmissions outlined above may still apply for 
idmission. Please contact the Program for in- 
ormation. 

After admission to the Radiologic Technology 
Program, the student may pay a $50.00 non- 
efundable Health Programs Deposit to reserve 
i seat in the program. This deposit is applied 
o the student's first quarter matriculation fee. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and have 
enrolled in the Associate Degree Program in 
Radiologic Technologies, but who have either 
withdrawn or been dismissed without prejudice 



from the program, may apply for readmission to 
the program only if they have a cumulative col- 
lege GPA of 2.0 at the time they wish to reenter. 
The student's readmission will be based upon 
space availability and recommendation by the 
Radiologic Technologies Admissions Commit- 
tee. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Health Science 

Criteria for Admission to 
Program 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State Col- 
lege. 

2. Completed Health Science Program appli- 
cation (Send to Health Science Major Of- 
fice). 

3. If applicant is currently a health practitioner, 
include: 

A. A copy of your professional health cre- 
dentials. 

B. Confidential Appraisal Form Send to 
Health Science Major Office. 

Criteria for Admission to 
Courses 

1. Completion of 90 hours of appropriate 
coursework. 

2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all courses with 
not more than one science repeat. 

3. Advanced Standing: All credit for previous 
coursework will be subject to evaluation by 
the Health Science, Physical Education & 
Recreation department head. Admission to 
and progression through the program is a 
function of the Head of Health Science, 
Physical Educaiton & Recreation. 



Baccalaureate Degree 
Medical Technology 
Program 

The professional phase of the Medical Tech- 
nology curriculum begins in the Fall quarter of 
each year with the MT courses. Students desir- 
ing acceptance to the Medical Technology Pro- 
gram should make application to the program 
during the early spring of the preceding aca- 
demic year. 



34 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Minimum Admission 
Requirements 

1 . SAT of at least 800 with 350 or more in Math 
and 350 or more in Verbal. 

2. Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.2 or 
more. 

3. Completion of required chemistry and bi- 
ology courses prior to the senior year. 

4. Science course (Chemistry and Biology) 
average of 2.25 or better with no more than 
one required science course with a grade 
of "D". 

5. Satisfactory completion of Regents' Testing 
Program. 

Other Requirements 

Per NAACLS requirement, all applicants must 
have taken the organic or biochemistry course 
and the microbiology course within the past 
seven years. Updating coursework can be done 
by completion (a grade of "C" or better) of the 
appropriate course or by a challenge exami- 
nation. 

Currently enrolled Armstrong State College 
students must also meet the requirements for 
admission to the MT program and apply to the 
program. 

Transfer students must be accepted to the 
college with "Regular Status" admission. 

Certified associate degree medical laboratory 
technicians may receive transfer credit for junior 
level MT courses upon presentation of accept- 
able certification scores and/or transfer credit 
and satisfactory completion of written and/or 
practical examinations in the professional con- 
tent areas. 



An applicant with B.S. degree not desiring the 
B.S. in Medical Technology degree must mee 
the National Accrediting Agency for Clinica 
Laboratory Sciences academic prerequisites fo 
Medical Technology. These students will be 
awarded a certificate upon completion of the 
professional coursework. 

Foreign applicants must meet the require 
ments for admission to Armstrong State College 
as outlined in the college catalog. 

Application Process 

1. Complete all requirements for Applicatioi 
for Admission to Armstrong State College; 
if not currently enrolled at ASC. 

2. Complete an Application to Medical Tech 
nology Program form. 

3. Have official transcripts sent to Program D 
rector. 

4. If certified, have scores sent to Prograr 
Director. (Ask Program Director for form le( 
ter.) 

5. Applicants meeting the minimum admia 
sion requirements will be invited for an in 
terview with at least two of the Admissioj 
Committee members, one of whom is th 
Program Director. 

6. Request two references to complete Cor 
fidential Appraisal Form to be forwarded t 
Program Director. 

7. All applicants will be informed by letter 
their application status. 




Financial 
Information 



\ 



36 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Expenses 

The following schedules list the principal ex- 
penses and regulations concerning the pay- 
ment of fees. Fees and charges are subject to 
change at the end of any quarter. When such 
changes are made, notice will be given as far 
in advance as possible 

Tuition 

Georgia Residents 

The matriculation fee for students registering 
for at least 1 2 quarter hours is $382.00. Students 
carrying fewer than 12 credit hours on campus 
in a quarter will pay $32.00 per quarter hour. 
This fee is waived for residents of Georgia upon 
presentation of written documentation that they 
are 62 years of age or older. 



Out-of-State Residents 

Full time students who are non-residents of 
Georgia pay a fee of $1,145.00. Those carrying 
fewer than 12 credit hours in a quarter pay 
$96.00 per quarter hour tuition. Out-of state tu- 
ition fees are waived for active duty military per- 
sonnel and their dependents stationed in 
Georgia (except military personnel assigned to 
this institution for educational purposes). 

Regents' Policies Governing 
Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, 
the applicant must establish the following facts 
to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 
1 . (a) If a person is 18 years of age or older, 
(s)he may register as a resident student 
only upon a showing that (s)he has been a 
legal resident of Georgia for a period of at 
least twelve months immediately preceding 
the date of registration, 
(b) No emancipated minor or person 18 
years of age or older shall be deemed to 
have gained or acquired in-state residence 
status for fee purposes while attending any 
educational institution in this State, in the 
absence of a clear demonstration that (s)he 
has in fact established legal residence in 
this State. 



2. If a person is under 18 years of age, (s)hi 
may register as a resident student onl 
upon a showing that a supporting parent c 
guardian»has been a legal resident of Geoi 
gia for a period of at least twelve month 
immediately preceding the date of registrs 
tion. 

3. A person stationed in Georgia who is o 
full-time, active military duty with the arme< 
forces and a spouse and dependent chi 
dren may register upon payment of resider 
fees even though they have not been lege 
residents of Georgia for the precedin 
twelve months. 

4. A full-time employee of the University Sys 
tern and spouse and dependent childre 
may register on the payment of resider 
fees even though (s)he has not been a leg; 
resident of Georgia for the twelve months 

5. Non-resident graduate students who ho! 
teaching or research assistantships requi 
ing at least on-third time service may rec 
ister as students in the institution in whic 
they are employed on payment of resider 
fees. 

6. Full-time teachers in the public schools i 
Georgia and their dependent children ma 
enroll as students in the University Systerr 
institutions on the payment of resident fee 

7. All aliens shall be classified as non-res 
dents, provided, however, that an alien wh 
is living in this country under a visa pe 
mitting permanent residence shall have tr 
same privilege of qualifying for resident st 
tus for fee purposes as a citizen of tr 

1 United States. 

8. International students selected by the i 
stitution's president or his authorized re 
resentative may be enrolled upon payme 
of in-state fees provided the number 
waivers does not exceed the quota a 
proved by the Board of Regents for th 
institution. 

9. If the parents or legal guardian of a min 
change the legal residence to another sta 
following a period of legal residence 
Georgia, the minor may continue to taf 
courses for a period of twelve months c 
the payment of resident fees. After the e 
piration of the twelve month period the st. 
dent may continue his registration or 
upon the payment of fees at the non-re! 
dent rate. 



riniMm^iMu iiNruriMMiiUN 



6f 



In the event that a legal resident of Georgia 
is appointed as guardian of a non-resident 
minor, such minor will not be permitted to 
register as a resident student until the ex- 
piration of one year from the date of court 
appointment, and then only upon proper 
showing that such appointment was not 
made to avoid payment of the non-resident 
fees. 



Residency Reclassification 

A student is responsible for registering under 
ie proper residency classification. A student 
lassified as a nonresident who believes that he/ 
ie is entitled to be reclassified as a legal res- 
lent may petition the Registrar for a change in 
:atus. The petition must be filed no later than 
xty (60) days after the quarter begins in order 
>r the student to be considered for reclassifi- 
ation for the quarter. If the petition is granted, 
^classification will not be retroactive to prior 
uarters. The necessary forms for this purpose 
re available in the Registrar's office. 



Jtudent Housing 



To secure housing, students must send a 
100.00 deposit with their housing application, 
lefer to the housing contract for specific terms 
nd conditions. 

The fee for double occupancy is $495.00 and 
635.00 for single occupancy per quarter. 

: ood Service 

All students who reside in the dormitory must 
ujrchase a 5-day, 15-meal plan at the current 
^e of $390.00 per quarter. 



prior to graduation. If candidate is receiving a. 
second degree at the same graduation cere- 
monies an addition $5.00 is due. The full $25.00 
is charged for a second degree awarded at a 
subsequent graduation ceremony. A fee of 
$15.00 is charged for each replacement di- 
ploma. 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS DEPOSIT $50.00 
Reserves a seat in appropriate health program, 
payable upon application to program. 
I.D. CARD FEE $1.00 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE $20.00 

Non-refundable fee charged to students who 
register after the registration period. 
STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE $18.50/qtr. 

•All students pay each quarter. 
TRANSCRIPT FEE, OFFICIAL 1 free, $2.00 

each additional 
Unofficial transcripts for academic advisement 
and schedule planning will be issued at no 
charge. 

Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty- 
five minute private lesson per week (Music 130) 
or a fifty minute private lesson per week (Music 
140, 240, 340, 440). A special fee of $42.00 is 
charged for students enrolled in Music 130. A 
special fee of $84.00 is assessed for Music 140- 
440 to music majors enrolled for less than 12 
hours and to students who are not music majors. 
Music majors may enroll, at no charge for one 
applied music course from Music 140-440. Ad- 
ditional applied music courses will be assessed 
a special fee at the non-music major rate. 

The applied music fee is refundable only if the 
student does not meet the first scheduled les- 
son. 



jther Special Costs 

APPLICATION FEE $10.00 

/lust accompany initial application. Acceptance 
4 application fee does not constitute accept- 
ance of the student. Non-refundable. 
\THLETIC FEE $37.50/qtr. 

V.I students pay each quarter. 
EXIT EXAM FEE 

: ee for Graduate Record Examinations or Na- 
ional Teacher Examinations are announced in 
est bulletins. 

GRADUATION FEE $25.00 

3 ayable by each candidate for graduation when 
graduation application submitted two quarters 



38 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Summary of Fees* 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 382.00 

Student Activity, per quarter $ 18.50 

Athletic, per quarter $ 37.50 

Total for Georgia Residents ... $ 438.00 
Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter ... $ 763.00 

Total for Non-Residents $ 1 ,201 .00 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, 

per quarter hours.: $ 32.00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time 

Students, 

per quarter hour (in addition to 

Matriculation Fee) $ 64.00 

*The fees shown are for the 1987-88 academic 
year and are subject to change. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when 
the course is scheduled by the College. 

Students who formally withdraw from a short 
course or conference before its first meeting will 
receive a full refund of fees paid provided the 
withdrawal is in writing and is received by the 
Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Educa- 
tion prior to the first class meeting of the course 
or conference. Withdrawals made in writing after 
the first class meeting will be given a refund 
minus a ten dollar handling fee. No refunds will 
be made for withdrawals received after the sec- 
ond class meeting. Fees paid for courses or 
conferences cancelled by the Coastal Georgia 
Center for Continuing Education will be re- 
funded 100%. 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees, including housing and food 
service, will be made only upon written appli- 
cation for withdrawal from school. No refunds 
will be made to students dropping a course. 
Students who formally withdraw during the reg- 
istration period and the first week of classes are 
entitled to a refund of 80% of the fees paid for 
that quarter. Students who formally withdraw 
during the period between the first and second 
week of classes are entitled to a refund of 60% 
of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
formally withdraw between the second and third 
week of classes are entitled to a refund of 40% 
of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
formally withdraw during the third and fourth 
week of classes are entitled to a refund of 20% 
of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who 
withdraw after the fourth week of classes will be 



entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paic 
that quarter. The refund schedule for the Sum 
mer Quarter is printed in the Summer Quarte 
Schedule of Classes. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student delinquent in the payment of an; 
financial obligation to the College will have 
grade reports and transcripts of records encum 
bered. Grade reports and transcripts will not be 
released, nor will the student be allowed to re 
register at the college until all financial obliga 
tions are met. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full a 
the time of registration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to th< 
bank on which it is drawn, the student's regis 
tration will be cancelled and the student may re 
register only on payment of a service charge c 
$15.00 or five percent of the check, whicheve 
is greater, and the late registration fee. 

Financial Aid 



Governing Principles 

Armstrong State College subscribes to th 
principle that the primary purpose of a studer 
financial aid program is to provide financial as 
sistance to students who without such assfi 
tance would be unable to attend college. Th 
primary responsibility for financing a college ec 
ucation is the inherent obligation of the studei 
and/or family. Financial assistance from Arn 
strong State College should be viewed as suf 
plementary to the efforts of the student andA 
family. An assessment of parental ability to coi 
tribute toward the student's educational e: 
penses is made by the College Scholarsh 
Service so that neither the parent, the studer 
nor Armstrong State College will be required 
bear an undue share of the financial respons 
bility. 

General Information 

Student financial aid is awarded to eligib 
students on the basis of need in nearly all cast 
except scholarships which have been provide 
by donors for the purpose of recognizing ac 
demic promise or achievement. The deterrr 
nation of need is provided for Armstrong Sta 
College students through the use of the Fina 



1-INMrN^IML I1NI-UMMAMUN 



jy 



:ial Aid Form (FAF) and the College Scholarship 
Service which processes this form. The process 
nvolves an analysis of the data provided by the 
student's family or, if independent, by the stu- 
jent This analysis is sent to the Office of Student 
r inancial Aid where it is compared with the cost 
Df education for the appropriate classification of 
student. If the analysis shows that the family con- 
ribution or self contribution is less than the cost 
Df education, financial need has been estab- 
ished. The Office of Student Financial Aid has 
he legal right to challenge information provided 
3n the Financial Aid Form if, in the opinion of the 
inancial aid officer, that information appears to 
ae inaccurate, incorrect, or misleading. 

In general, students who enter the College at 
:he beginning of the Fall Quarter have a greater 
opportunity to receive financial assistance then 
hose who enter later in the academic year. The 
awards processing time usually runs from May 
1 to August 31. It is during this period that the 
Office of Student Financial Aid distributes its 
yearly allocation of funds to students who have 
completed the process cycle. In the event that 
there is a shortage of funds, students who are 
eligible for financial aid but whose applications 
were late will be placed on a waiting list until 
sucn time as funds become available. 

Students are eligible to apply for financial as- 
sistance provided that: (1 ) the student meets the 
requirements pertinent to the program(s) from 
which assistance is sought; and (2) the student 
has been admitted to the college or is enrolled 
in good standing and is making satisfactory ac- 
ademic progress. Students who are classified 
as Transient, continuing Education, or Ex- 
change are not eligible for financial aid. Stu- 
dents are required to adhere to all regulations 
and requirements of the program from which 
they receive assistance and to notify the Office 
of Financial Aid of any change in status which 
may affect their eligibility for aid. 

Application Information 

An applicant for student financial aid must: 

1. Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at 
College; 

2. Obtain, complete, and submit a Financial 
Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship 
Service by May 31 preceding the next ac- 
ademic year 

3. Submit a PELL GRANT Student Aid Report 
to the Office of Student Financial Aid by 
May 31 preceding the next academic year 



4. Complete an Armstrong Application for Fi : 
nancial Aid. 

5. Submit a copy of the student's and parent's 

(if dependent) Income Tax returns from the ' 
previous year. 

It may be necessary to complete additional 
forms depending on a student's year in school, 
major course of study, and/or eligibility for a par- 
ticular program. Applications for financial assis- 
tance must be repeated annually. Most student 
financial aid awards are for the entire academic 
year, with payments made to the student in 
equal quarterly installments. 

The minimum number of quarter hours for 
which a student financial aid recipient may enroll 
per quarter varies from program to program. 
Some require at least 12 hours per quarter (full- 
time status). All programs require that the stu- 
dent be enrolled at least half-time, taking 6 or 
more quarter hours. 

Students applying for financial aid, whether 
eligible or not, who do not meet or adhere to the 
above requirements will not be considered for 
financial aid. It is the responsibility of the parents 
and/or student to determine that all pertinent in- 
formation and data have been obtained and are 
located in the Office of Student Financial Aid to 
assure a complete and accurate awarding of 
financial assistance. 

When the student has received acknowl- 
edgement from the College Scholarship Service 
that the Financial Aid Form (FAF) has been sent 
to the College and the student has delivered the 
PELL Grant Aid Report (SAR) and the Request 
for Student Financial Aid, the Office of Student 
Financial Aid will send the student a tentative 
award notice. The student should schedule an 
appointment with a financial aid officer. The of- 
ficer will discuss the student's financial aid pack- 
age, and a final award letter indicating the type 
of award(s) and amount(s) will be processed 

Students who submit the PELL Grant Student 
Aid Report only will not be considered for any 
other type of financial assistance awarded for 
the College. 

Transfer Students 

In addition to the above requirements for all 
financial aid students, transfer students are re- 
quired to submit a complete Financial Aid Tran- 
script from the financial aid office of each 
institution of higher education previously at- 
tended whether or not aid was received. No 
awards will be made until these documents have 
been received by the Office of Student Financial 
Aid. 



40 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Types of Aid 

Grants — Awards that students are not 
required to repay. 

Pell Grants are federal grants based on need. 
Pell Grants are awarded to eligible undergrad- 
uate students who are enrolled for at least six 
hours per quarter. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants (SEOG) are federal grants awarded to 
undergraduates who exhibit exceptional finan- 
cial need. 

Georgia Student Incentive Grants are state 
grants awarded to full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents who are legal residents of Georgia. 

Loans — Money that students borrow and 
repay with either interest or service. 

Stafford Loans are available through local 
lending institutions and state agencies. Repay- 
ment begins after the student leaves school. 

Georgia Service-Cancellable Guaranteed 
Student Loans are offered for certain "critical" 
health and teaching fields. These loans are re- 
paid by service in Georgia after graduation. 

PLUS Loans are available to independent 
students and the parent of dependent students 
regardless of need. The maximum loan amount 
is $4,000 per year. 

Institutional Short-term Loans are available 
to students for a maximum of 60 days. These 
loans are used primarily to assist students with 
the payment of tuition and fees. These loans are 
available to eligible students for a maximum of 
$300. Other requirements concerning short- 
term loans are available in the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 

Employment 

The College Work Study Program provides 
on-campus employment for eligible undergrau- 
date students. These awards are based on 
need. 

Institutional Work Study positions are of- 
fered on a limited basis to students with specific 
skills. These awards are not based on need. 

Scholarships 

The following list includes many of the schol- 
arships available to Armstrong students. This 
listing is intended for reference only and is not 
an exhuastive source of all funds available. 



ASC Alumni Association Scholar- 
ship: Open to all full-time students. Partici- 
pation in civic and campus organizations, 
financial need, and academic standing are con- 
sidered. For additional information, contact the 
Alumni Office. 

ASC Alumni Association Entering Freshmen 
Scholarship: Full scholarship for full-time 
freshmen with combined SAT of 1000 or 3.0 
GPA. For additional information, contact the Ai- 
umni Office. 

Savannah Jaycees: Full scholarship for full- 
time Chatham County residents. Civic and com- 
munity involvement, financial need and aca- 
demic standing are considered. For additional 
information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 
American Assn. of University Women: Open 
to older women in non-traditional fields with a 
3.0 GPA, who are Chatham County residents. 
For additional information, contact the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Auxiliary to Georgia Medical Society: Full 
time Chatham County nursing student with high 
academic standing (3.0 GPA or above). For ad- 
ditional information, contact the Financial Aid Of- 
fice. 

Billy Bond Memorial Scholarship: Open tc 
all students with 3.0 GPA. Civic and community 
involvement are considered. For additional in- 
formation, contact the Financial Aid Office. 
Chemistry & Physics Faculty Scholar- 
ship: Open to all students. Academic stand- 
ing is considered. For additional information 
contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 
Civifan: Open to Armstrong students of all dis 
ciplines with at least a 3.0 GPA or 1000 SAT, i 
freshman. For additional information, contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Ross E. Clark Scholarship: Full-time Politica 
Science student with 3.0 GPA, Freshman 120C 
SAT. For additional information, contact the De 
partment of Government. 
Cooper Scholarship: Open to all undergrad 
uate females and majors (except law, theology 
and medicine) based on financial need. Re 
quires B average and good standing. Applica 
tion deadline April 15,1988. For additiona 
information, contact First Union Bank. 
ASC Engineering Society Scolarship: Full 
time sophomore and junior engineering stu 
dents, 2.75 GPA and active member of Engi 
neering Society. For additional information 
contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



41 



ASC Freshmen Engineering Scholar- 
ship: Entering freshmen with engineering ma- 
jor. For additional information, contact the 
Chemistry & Physics Department. 
Fairway Lincoln Mercury Scholarship: For 
additional information, contact the Admissions 
Office. 

Curtis G. Hames Nursing Scholarship: BSN 
Nursing scholarship for full-time junior, senior, 
and graduate students with C or higher average. 
Residents of Southeast Georgia. Financial need 
is considered. For additional information, con- 
tact Georgia Southern College Foundation, Inc. 
Sarah Mills Hodge Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Awarded to full-time Chatham County 
students for scholastic merit. Requires 3.0 GPA. 
For additional information, contact the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Memorial Medical Center Auxiliary Nursing 
School: ADN or BSN. Georgia resident with 
2.5 high school GPA and +750 SAT scores. If 
already a nursing student, must have at least 
2.5 GPA. For additional information, contact 
Memorial Medical Center. 
Kiwanis Memorial Educational Fund: Full- 
time entering freshmen. High achievers. For ad- 
ditional information, contact Office of Admis- 
sions 

Menzel-Magnus Award for Scholarship in 
Criminal Justice: Awarded to Criminal Jus- 
tice senior with highest academic average. For 
additional information, contact the Department 
of Government. 

Pederewski Scholarship/Loan Pro- 
gram: Dental Hygiene students who are not 
receiving other scholarships or loans. Must have 
2.0 GPA. Quarterly tuition only. Must be Georgia 
residents. Financial need is considered. For ad- 
ditional information, contact the Dental Hygiene 
Department. 

Savannah Foods and Industries Engineering 
Scholarship: Awarded to engineering stu- 
dents with demonstrated academic potential. 
Contact the Director of Engineering Studies. 
Savannah Pathology Laboratory Scholar- 
ship: Full-time Med Tech senior demonstrat- 
ing financial need and commitment to degree 
program. For additional information, contact the 
ASC Medical Technology Department. 
Anthony Porter Scholarship: Full scholar- 
ship. Academic standing, civic and community 
involvement are considered. For additional in- 
formation, contact the Financial Aid Office. 



Savannah Scholarship for Radiologic Tech- 
nologists: Full-time freshman or sophomore / 
Radiologic Technology major with 2.0 GPA. For 
additional information, contact the Radiologic 
Technology Department. 
Solomon's Lodge: Full-time students in top 
30% of class and 900 SAT. Civic and community 
involvement, and financial need are considered. 
For additional information, contact Solomon's 
Lodge No. 1 

Regents Scholarship: Georgia residents in 
the top 25% of their class. For additional infor- 
mation, contact the Financial Aid Office. 
Regents Opportunity Grants Pro- 
gram: Minority graduate students. Georgia 
residents. Financial need is considered For ad- 
ditional information, contact the Financial Aid Of- 
fice. 

Rotary Club of Savannah Scholarship: Full- 
time students with 3.0 GPA. For additional in- 
formation, contact the Secondary Education De- 
partment. 

Savannah Volunteer Guards Scholar- 
ship: Full-time freshmen with high school GPA 
of 3.0 and 1000 SAT. Recipient must take three 
quarters of military science for duration of schol- 
arship. For additional information, contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Ty Cobb Scholarship: Students must have 
completed 45 hours with B average and be 
Georgia residents. For additional information, 
contact the Financial Aid Office. 
Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of Georgia Schol- 
arship Foundation: Full-time students, aca- 
demic standing (3.0 GPA), civi and community 
involvement and financial need are considered. 
For additional information, contact the Financial 
Aid Office 

WOW - Women of Worth: Full time student 
who is an active WOW member. For additional 
information, contact the Psychology Depart- 
ment. 

Government Benefits 

Social Security provides monthly benefits to 
children when a parent dies, starts receiving So- 
cial Security retirement, or starts receiving dis- 
ability benefits. Because of changes m the law, 
students should contact the Social Security Of- 
fice concerning eligibility 

The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Pro- 
gram provides financial assistance for the ap- 
plicant who possesses an impairment which 



42 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



would prove to be a vocational handicap. Stu- 
dents who think that they may qualify under this 
program should contact the Vocational Reha- 
bilitation Center. Applicants sponsored by Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation or other community 
agencies must apply at least six weeks before 
the beginning of any quarter to insure proper 
processing of applications. 

Veterans Benefits 

V.A. Educational Benefits may be used for 
study at Armstrong. Contact the Office of Finan- 
cial Aid and Veterans Affairs for specific instruc- 
tions on application procedures. 

Satisfactory Academic 
Progress 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as 
amended by Congress in 1980, mandates that 
institutions of higher education establish mini- 
mum standards of "satisfactory progress" for 
students receiving financial aid. To receive fi- 
nancial aid at Armstrong, a student must both 
maintain a satisfactory grade point average and 
be making satisfactory academic progress as 
outlined below. These requirements apply to the 
following programs: Pell Grant, Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work 
Study, Guaranteed Student Loans, PLUS Loans, 
Georgia Incentive Grant, and other State Stu- 
dent Incentive Grants. 

It is the student's responsibility to read and 
understand Armstrong's policy regarding Stan- 
dards of Academic Progress. Failure to under- 
stand and adhere to these policies will result in 
a student's ineligibility for aid. 

(1 ) Students must earn the following mimimum 
number of hours each academic year (fall 
through spring quarters) depending upon 
their enrollment status: 

(a) Full-time students - 36 hrs. per aca- 
demic year (12 hrs per quarter) 

(b) 3 /4 time students - 27 hrs. per aca- 
demic year (9 hrs. per quarter) 

(c) V2 time students - 18 hrs. per aca- 
demic year (6 hrs. per quarter) 

Students whose enrollment status varies 
during the year should follow the quart- 
erly requirements listed above. For ex- 
ample, a student who enrolls full-time 
the first two quarters but only 3 / 4 the third 
quarter would be required to complete 
33 hours (12 + 12 + 9 = 33). 



Student records will be checked each 
year for compliance at the end of spring 
quarter. Students who are not meeting 
the above requirements will be consid- 
ered ineligible for further aid until the 
appropriate number of hours are 
earned. 

Grade of A,B,C,D, and P will be consid- 
ered as credits earned. F,I,W,WF, and 
U will not be considered as credits 
earned. 

(2) Students who are enrolled full-time will be 
expected to complete their degree within 
five years. No students will be eligible for 
aid if they have attempted 225 hours or 
more. Students are therefore cautioned 
against repeating too many courses. 

(3) In addition to earning an appropriate num- 
ber of hours per year, students must main- 
tain the following grade point average. 



S ATTEMPTED 


REQUIRED GPA 


0-15 


1.3 


16-30 


1.4 


31 -45 


1.5 


46-60 


1.6 


61 -75 


1.7 


76-90 


1.8 


91 - 120 


1.9 


21 - over 


2.0 



Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to 
remain eligible for aid. 

(4) Students who are enrolled in the Develop- 
mental Studies program will follow the reg- 
ulations of that program. Students will be 
required to meet all Satisfactory Progress 
regulations upon completing the requite- 
ments of the Developmental Studies Pro- 
gram. Suspension from Developmental 
Studies makes a student ineligible for fur- 
ther aid. 

(5) Transfer students must be in good standing' 
to receive the initial disbursement of aid. 
Credit hours attempted at other institutions 
will be considered in the 225 hour 
maximum. Other Satisfactory Progress 
calculations will consider only the student's 
academic record at Armstrong State 
College. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



43 



Reinstatement of Aid 

The reinstatment of aid is dependent on the 
availability of funds. 

(1) Students whose aid is terminated because 
they failed to earn the required number of 
hours may request their aid be reinstated 
once they earn the required number of 
hours. These hours may be earned during 
the summer or during the following year. 
The student is not eligible for aid during 
these "catch up" quarters. 

(2) Students whose aid is terminated due to 
insufficient GPA or standing may request 
their aid be reinstated once they have at- 
tended at least one quarter at full-time sta- 
tus and receive at least a 2.0 GPA. The 
student must also meet the GPA require- 
ments listed above. 



Appeal of Aid Suspension 

Students who feel that they can demonstrate 
mitigating circumstances which affected their 
academic progress may make an appeal to the 
Dean of Academic and Enrollment Services. 







44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 







Academic 
Policies and 
Information 



46 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic Advisement 

All students are required to participate in the 
advisement system at Armstrong State College. 
The Vice President and Dean of Faculty gives 
overall direction to the advisement program, 
with the appropriate department heads coordi- 
nating advisement activities within the various 
departments. Students who have selected a ma- 
jor or general field of study are advised by ad- 
visors within the appropriate department. 
Developmental Studies students are advised by 
advisors within the Developmental Studies De- 
partment. All other students are advised by Core 
Curriculum Advisors. Freshmen and transfers 
who have selected a major will be advised in 
the academic department of their major. Fresh- 
men and transfers who have not selected a ma- 
jor and have not completed the core 
requirements will be advised by Core Curricu- 
lum Advisors. 

The student's course selections must be ap- 
proved by an advisor as an integral part of the 
registration process. Students are responsible 
for fulfilling the requirements of their degree pro- 
gram and must observe all regulations for ad- 
mission to courses, including meeting 
prerequisite requirements. 

English Composition and 
Mathematics Requirements 

See English Composition and Mathematics 
Requirements in the Degree Requirements Sec- 
tion of this catalog, where important require- 
ments are outlined for entering students. 

State Requirement in History 
and Government 

See State Requirement in History and Gov- 
ernment in the Degree Requirements Section of 
this catalog. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students 
is 15-18 quarter hours including a course in 
physical education during the freshman and 
sophomore years. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is 
registered for 12 or more hours. A part-time stu- 
dent is one registered for fewer than 12 quarter 
hours. A student should plan about ten hours 
preparation per week for each 5 quarter hour 
course. 



Classification of Students 

A student who has earned fewer than 45 
quarter hours will be classified as a freshman; 
between 45 and 89 a sophomore; between 90' 
and 1 34 as a junior; and 1 35 or more as a senior. 

Overloads and Courses At 
Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter 
hours will be granted by the Registrar to a stu- 
dent: 

1. with an average grade of "B" for full-time 
enrollment in the preceding quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 
or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two 
quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more 
than 21 quarter hours. A student who is on ac- 
ademic probation will not be permitted to reg- 
ister for more than 18 quarter hours. Exceptions 
to these limitations may be made only by the 
appropriate Dean. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the 
same time takes courses for credit at another 
college may not transfer such credit to Arm- 
strong, unless written permission from the ap- 
propriate Dean has been obtained. 

Grade Reports 

Grade reports are issued directly to students 
at the end of each quarter. The following grades 
are used in the determination of grade-point- 
averages: 

Grade Honor Points 

A (excellent) 4.0 

B (good) 3.0 

C (satisfactory) 2.0 

D (passing) 1.0 

F (failure) 0.0 

VVF (withdrew, failing) 0.0 

The cumulative GPA is determined by dividing 
the total honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted at Armstrong State College. The ad- 
justed GPA is determined by dividing the total 
honor points earned by the total hours at- 
tempted, with hours and honor points for re- 
peated courses not duplicated in the 
calculation. 

Armstrong State College also uses the follow- 
ing symbols for grade reports. These symbols 
carry no honor points and are not included in 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



47 



he determination of either the cumulative GPA 
)r the adjusted GPA. 

Symbol Explanation 

W withdrew, no penalty 

I in progress or incomplete 

S satisfactory 

U unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

P passing 

NR not reported 

An "I" which has not been removed by the 
middle of the succeeding quarter is changed to 
an "F" unless the instructor recommends an ex- 
tension in writing addressed to the appropriate 
Dean. The "S" and "U" symbols may be utilized 
for completion of degree requirements other 
than academic course work (such as student 
teaching, clinical practice, etc.). A "WF" (With- 
drew, Failing) is recorded for any student with- 
drawing after the mid-term date. Exceptions to 
this policy must be approved by the Dean of the 
School in which the course is taught and will be 
approved only on the basis of hardship. Appeals 
for a change of grade may be initiated through 
the head of the appropriate academic depart- 
ment in accordance with the Regulations of Arm- 
strong State College. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten 
quarter hours of course work who earn an honor 
point average of at least 3.6 will be placed on 
the Dean's List. Only course work taken at Arm- 
strong will be used in the computation of Dean's 
List honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with 
an honor point average of 3.2 through 3.499 will 
be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students gradu- 
ating with an honor point average of 3.5 through 
3.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students gradu- 
ated with an honor point average of 3.8 through 
4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other 
accredited institutions will be considered In 
computing honors for graduation. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class 
meetings and the effect of attendance on the 
grades in a course are left to the discretion of 
the instructor. 



A student is responsible for knowing every- 
thing that is announced, discussed, or lectured 
upon in class as well as for mastering all as- 
signed reading. A student is also responsible 
for submitting on time all assignments and tests, 
recitations and unannounced quizzes 

The instructor will be responsible for informing 
each class at its first meeting what constitutes 
excessive absence in that particular class. Each 
student is responsible for knowing the attend- 
ance regulation and for complying with it An 
instructor may drop a student from any class 
with a grade of "W" or "WF," as appropriate, if 
in the instructor's judgment the student's ab- 
sences have been excessive. 

Academic Standing 

The college recognizes four academic cate- 
gories: Good Standing, Good Standing with 
Warning, Academic Probation, and Academic 
Suspension. Students are expected to maintain 
or exceed the grade point average (GPA) as 
indicated in the chart below. 

Quarter Hours Attempted Required Adjusted 
at Armstrong and GPA 

Elsewhere 

0-15 1.3 

16-30 1.4 

31-45 1.5 

46-60 16 

61-75 1.7 

76-90 1.8 

91-120 19 

121 and over 2 

A student who falls below the required GPA 
for the first time is placed on Good Standing 
with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted GPA 
to the required level during the next quarter will 
result in Academic Probation Students on Ac- 
ademic Probation are not in Good Standing If 
the student's adjusted GPA is raised to the re- 
quired level, the student is returned to Good 
Standing. The second or any subsequent failure 
to meet the required GPA will result in Academic 
Probation In order to participate in extracurri- 
cular activities endorsed by the college, stu- 
dents must be in Good Standing or Good 
Standing with Warning Students under warning 
should plan both curncular and extracurncula 
activities under the guidance of their advisors 

Students on Academic Probation who fail to 
achieve the required adjusted GPA, but who do 
earn an average of at least 2 during the pro- 



48 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



bationary quarter, will be continued on Aca- 
demic Probation for the next quarter of 
attendance. Students on Academic Probation 
who neither achieve the required adjusted GPA 
nor earn at least a 2.0 average during the pro- 
bationary quarter will be placed on Academic 
Suspension from the college for one quarter. A 
student on Academic Suspension for the first 
time has the option of attending summer school 
without having to appeal the suspension. How- 
ever, a student who fails to make satisfactory 
progress as a result of summer school will have 
to appeal for readmission in the fall quarter. 

A student suspended for academic reasons 
for the first or second time may appeal by letter 
to the Committee on Admissions and Academic 
Standing. This letter should state the nature of 
any extenuating circumstances relating to the 
academic deficiency, and must be delivered to 
the office of the Vice President and Dean of Fac- 
ulty no later than 9 AM of registration day. The 
Committee on Admissions and Academic 
Standing will make a recommendation to the 
President and the decision of the President is 
final. 

A student re-entering the college after an Ac- 
ademic Suspension is placed on Academic Pro- 
bation and must meet the requirements listed 
above. A third Academic Suspension is final. 

Repeating Courses 

Any course may be repeated with the last 
grade to be counted in the adjusted GPA. A 
student who repeats any course should com- 
plete a "Notice of Course Repetition" form avail- 
able in the Office of Registrar. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after the 
quarter has begun must obtain a Drop-Add No- 
tice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice 
must be signed by the instructor of the course 
being dropped and returned by the student to 
the Office of the Registrar. 

A student who drops a course not more than 
seven class days after the course begins will 
receive no grade for the course. A student who 
drops a course after the first seven class days 
and on or before the quarterly dates listed for 
mid-terms will receive a "W" or a "WF" depend- 
ing on the status in the course. A student may 
not drop a course without penalty following the 
quarterly dates listed for mid-term. A student is 



not allowed to drop ENG 025, 101, 102, or 201 
at any time unless extenuating circumstances, 
prevail. In order to drop one of these courses, 
the drop form must be authorized by the Dean 
of the School of Arts and Sciences and Edu : 
cation or a designated representative. 

A Developmental Studies student (other than 
those auditing Developmental Studies courses) 
may not drop a Developmental Studies course 
without withdrawing from the College. 

Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to with- 
draw from college must begin the process in the 
Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal is 
required to ensure that the student is eligible to 
return to Armstrong State College at a future! 
date. Any refund to which a student is entitled 
will be considered on the basis of the date which 
appears on the withdrawal form. 

Medical Withdrawals 

A student may be administratively withdrawn 
from the college when in the judgment of Vice 
President of Student Affairs and the college phy- 
sician, if any, and after consultation with the stu- 
dent's parents and personal physician, if any, it 
is determined that the student suffers from a 
physical, mental, emotional or psychological 
health condition which: (a) poses a significant 
danger or threat of physical harm to the student 
or to- the person or property of others or (b) 
causes the student to interfere with the rights of 
other members of the college community or with 
the exercise of any proper activities or functions 
of the college or its personnel or (c) causes the 
student to be unable to meet institutional re- 
quirements for admission and continued enroll- 
ment, as defined in the student conduct code 
and other publications of the college. 

Except in emergency situations, a student 
shall, upon request, be accorded an appropri : 
ate hearing prior to final decision concerning his 
or her continued enrollment at the college. 

Auditing Courses 

A regular student wishing to audit a course 
without receiving credit must obtain permission 
of the instructor before registering for the 
course. During the registration process the stu- 
dent should request to audit. A student may not 
change from audit to credit status or from credit 
to audit status after completing the process of 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



49 



egistration for a course. A student who audits 
a course will have a "V" recorded for that course. 
The regular schedule of fees applies to auditors. 
Jnauthorized auditing is prohibited. 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College 
s dedicated to the proposition that the protec- 
tion of the grading system is in the interest of 
the student community. The Student Court is an 
institutional means to assure that the student 
community shall have primary disposition of in- 
fractions of the Honor Code and that students 
accused of such infractions shall enjoy those 
procedural guarantees traditionally considered 
essential to fair and impartial hearing, the fore- 
most of which is the presumption of innocence 
until guilt be established beyond a reasonable 
doubt. 

I. Responsibilities of students: 

All students must agree to abide by the 
rules of the Honor Code. A student shall not 
be accepted at Armstrong State College 
unless he or she signs a statement affirming 
his understanding of this agreement. The 
Honor Code shall be printed in the official 
bulletin and the Student Handbook. 

It will be the responsibility of the Stu- 
dent Court or its designated representative 
to conduct an orientation program at the 
beginning of each quarter for all newly en- 
tering students to explain fully the Honor 
Code and to allow full discussion of its re- 
quirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with 
any matter related to the Honor Code is 
invited to seek assistance in the Office of 
Student Affairs. 

II. Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations of the Honor Code may be of 
two kinds: (a) general and (b) those related 
to the peculiarities of specific course-re- 
lated problems and to the understanding 
of individual instructors. Any instructor 
whose conception of cheating would tend 
to enlarge or contract the general regula- 
tions defining cheating must explicity notify 
the affected students of the qualifications 
to the general regulations which he or she 
wishes to stipulate. The following will be 
considered general violations of the Honor 
Code. 



1. Giving or receiving any unauthorized 
help on any assignment, test or paper. 
The meaning of unauthorized help 
shall be made clear by the instructor 
of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating 

3. Plagiarizing. Plagiarism is the unack- 
nowledged use of another's words or 
ideas. Students must be familiar with 
the explanation of plagiarism given in 
the writing handbook used in freshman 
composition classes (pp. 457-459 in 
the current text, Writing: A College 
Handbook, Heffernan and Lincoln, 
1982). Ignorance of what constitutes 
plagiarism will not be accepted as an 
excuse for plagiarism. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the 
Student Court. 

5. Suborning, attemption to suborn, or in 
intimidating witnesses. 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation 
of the Honor Code. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may 
come to the Office of Student Affairs for 
assistance in contacting members of the 
Student Court. 

A. Self-reporting: A student who has bro- 
ken the Honor Code should report him- 
self, to a member of the Student Court. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) 
who is aware of a violation of the Honor 
Code must report the matter 

1 . Tell the person thought to be guilty 
to report himself to a member of the 
Student Court no later than the end 
of the next school day. After this 
designated time the person who is 
aware of the violation must inform 
a member of the Student Court so 
that the Student Court may contact 
the accused person if he has not 
already reported himself. 

2. Report the suspected violation di- 
rectly to a member of the Student 
Court without informing the ac- 
cused 

IV. The procedural rights of the students ac- 
cused of violations of the Honor Code 

The essence of the procedural rights of 
an accused is the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty Specific rights 
are as follows: 



50 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



1 . The accused will be notified in writing 
by the Student Court or its designated 
representative of the nature and de- 
tails of the offense with which he is 
charged along with the names of his 
accusers and the principal witnesses 

to be brought against him. This notifi- v. 
cation shall occur no less than three 
days prior to the date of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel 
of his own choosing. Such counsel will 
not participate directly in the proceed- 
ings except to advise his client. It is 
expected that such counsel will be 
drawn from the college community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing 
the charges shall be afforded an op- 
portunity to present witnesses and 
documentary or other evidence. The 
accused and any individual bringing 
the charges shall have the right to 
cross examine all witnesses and may, 
where the witnesses cannot appear 
because of illness or other cause ac- 
ceptable to the Court, present the 
sworn statement of the witnesses. The 
Court shall not be bound by formal 
rules governing the presentation of 
evidence, and it may consider any evi- 
dence presented which is of probative 
value in the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear 
witness against himself. The Court 
may not take the refusal of the ac- 
cused to testify as evidence of guilt, 
but this proviso does not give the ac- 
cused immunity from a hearing or from 
recommendations reached in a hear- 
ing simply because the accused does 
not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a 
complete audiotape of the hearing and 
to record prepared by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may 
be re-opened for consideration upon 
initiation of the accused acting through 
normal appeal channels. The accused 
shall not be put in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from 
the hearing room during the course of 
a hearing. Witnesses may not discuss 
a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will 
be allowed such observers of the hear- 
ing as may be commensurate with the 



space available. Otherwise, in the in- 
terests of the right of privacy of the 
accused, hearings will be private, ex- 
cept that the College may also have 
observers additional to the advisors to 
the Student Court. 
The Student Conduct Committee, the Stu- 
dent Court and Advisors to the Student 
Court: 
A. Student Conduct Committee 

1. The Student Conduct Committee 
shall be responsible to the faculty 
for recommending policies relating 
to the Academic Honor Code and 
the Code of Conduct, for formulat- 
ing or approving rules, enforce- 
ment procedures, and sanctions 
within the framework of existing pol- 
icies, and for recommending 
changes in the administration of 
any aspects of the Honor Code and 
the Student Code of Conduct. The 
Conduct Committee will also inter- 
view and select members for the 
Student Court. 

2. The Committee shall consist of five 
teaching faculty members, the Vice 
President of Student Affairs and 
four students. The four students will 
be the President and Vice Presi- 
dent of the Student Court, the Pres- 
ident of the Student Government 
Association, and one student-at- 
large. The faculty members shall be 
appointed by the faculty in accord- 
ance with the faculty statutes. 

3. The Vice President of Student Af- 
fairs shall assist the Conduct Com- 
mittee in the development of policy 
and in the discharge of its respon- 
sibilities. He shall coordinate the 
activities of all officials, commit- 
tees, student groups, and tribunals 
for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to 
student conduct that are proposed 
by any College official, committee 
or student group, and for which 
sanctions may be imposed in the 
name of the College, must be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for consid- 
eration and review prior to 
submission to the faculty and the 
student body. The Committee shall 
have 1 days in which to review the 
same. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



51 



B. Student Court 

1. The Student Court will be selected 
by the Student Conduct Committee 
and will be composed of twelve stu- 
dents. Due consideration will be 
given to equitable apportionment of 
court members on the basis of ac- 
ademic class, race, and sex. Stu- 
dents on academic probation may 
not serve. All appointments will be 
issued and accepted in writing. Ap- 
pointments will be made during 
Spring Quarter in time for newly 
elected members of the Court to 
assume their duties by May 1 . Ap- 
pointments will be made as needed 
to keep the Student Court staffed 
to do business on a reasonably 
prompt basis. These appointments 
may constitute permanent or tem- 
porary replacements as the Stu- 
dent Conduct Committee deems 
necessary. 

2. The Student Court will elect a Pres- 
ident, Vice President, and a Sec- 
retary from its membership. The 
President will preside at all meet- 
ings. The Vice President will as- 
sume the duties of the President if 
the President is absent. The Sec- 
retary will maintain written notes of 
all proceedings and audiotape rec- 
ords of all testimony, and will main- 
tain exhibits of evidence which by 
their nature may reasonably be 
maintained in the Court files. A quo- 
rum of the Court shall consist of 
seven members. A two-thirds ma- 
jority secret ballot vote is required 
to reach a finding of guilty. All other 
questions may be decided by a 
simple majority vote. 

3. Constituency of the Student Court 
during the Summer Quarter shall in- 
clude all appointed members in at- 
tendance, and others shall be 
appointed to membership by the 
Student Conduct Committee. 

4 Student Court members shall ex- 
amine their consciences carefully 
to determine whether they can in 
good conscience serve on a panel 
hearing a particular case, and in 
the event that there is any doubt, 
whatsoever, such member shall ex- 



cuse themselves from duty on the 
specific panel in question 
C. Advisors to the Court 

1. An advisor and an associate ad- 
visor to the Student Court shall be 
appointed by the President of the 
College. 

2. Ordinarily the advisor will serve in 
that office for one year only and 
usually will be succeeded in that 
position by the associate advisor. 
Therefore, after the initial appoint- 
ments, only an associate advisor 
will ordinarily be appointed each 
year. The succession of an asso- 
ciate to the advisor position is 
deemed to occur on the last day of 
Spring Quarter. If, for any reason, 
the advisor is unable to complete 
his term, the associate advisor shall 
succeed to the office of advisor and 
another associate advisor shall be 
appointed by the above proce- 
dures. If, during the Summer 
Quarter, neither advisor is on cam- 
pus, a temporary advisor will be ap- 
pointed. 

3. Duties of the advisor and the as- 
sociate advisor: It shall be the duty 
of the advisor to consult with the 
Court and to offer advice to the 
President and members of the 
Court on substantive and proce- 
dural questions. The advisor, or the 
associate advisor in the event the 
advisor is unable to attend, shall be 
present at all meetings and hear- 
ings of the Court. The advisor may 
not vote nor may he participate di- 
rectly in the conduct at hearings 
before the Court except through the 
chairman, or acting chairman, of 
the Court. The advisor should be 
governed at all times by the prin- 
ciple that a hearing before the Stu- 
dent Court is primarily a matter of 
student responsibility. 

VI Procedures and Penalities adopted by the 
Student Court. 

The Student Court shall formulate its own 
bylaws governing internal organization and 
procedure Such bylaws must be consist- 
ent with the Honor Code 
A. Hearings shall be called by the Court 
President to be held on a date not less 



52 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



than three nor more than ten class 
days after notice to the accused as 
provided in Section IV-2. Exceptions 
to these time requirements may be 
granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the 
Court shall make a recommendation to 
the Vice-President of the College as to 
the administrative action it deems ap- 
propriate within the following limita- 
tions: 

1 . A minimum penalty shall be loss of 
assignment or test credit for the as- 
signment or test for violations in- 
volving cheating as specified in 
Section II, subsections 1, 2, and 3. 
Additional penalities such as repri- 
mands, suspension, or others may 
be recommended for any aspects 
of Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense 
of any type shall be suspension for 
a full calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second of- 
fense may be suspension for three 
years. 

C. Immediately following a hearing, the 
accused will be informed of the Court's 

• finding, and its recommendation to the 
Vice President of the College. If the 
finding is guilty, the accused will be 
informed that the Court may reopen 
the case with the consent of the ac- 
cused for good cause, within a three 
week period. 

D. The Vice President of the College will 
inform all involved persons in writing 
of the action he has taken in view of 
Court recommendation. The Court 
Secretary will post public notice of the 
Vice President's action by case num- 
ber without identifying the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalities: 

Should a student have cause to question 
the findings of the Court or the action of the 
Vice President of the College or both, he 
has the right to appeal. The channels of 
appeal are as follows: 
A. Court findings and/or the administra- 
tive action of the Vice President of the 
College may be appealed within five 
days by writing the President of the 
College. Further appeal procedures 
will conform to the appeal procedures 
of the College and of the Policies of 



the Board of Regents, University Sys- 
tem of Georgia. 

VIII. Supervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of responding 
to reported infractions of the Honor Code, 
the Student Court is ultimately responsible 
to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be 
accomplished ordinarily through the Dean 
of Student Affairs and the Advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, 
of the College Statutes, the Dean of Student 
Affairs will provide general supervision of 
the Student Court and will provide other 
guidance or services as directed by the 
President of the College. 

IX. Revision of the Honor Code will require con- 
firmation by the majority vote of those fac- 
ulty and student body members voting. 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

General 

Degree Requirements 

1 . Each student is responsible for fulfilling the 
requirements of the degree program cho- 
sen in accordance with the regulations of 
the college catalog. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a de- 
gree are permitted only with the written ap- 
proval of the appropriate Dean, upon the 
recommendation of the department head. 

3. A student will normally graduate under the 
catalog in effect at the time of admission to 
the College. In the School of Health Profes- 
sions, a student will graduate under the cat- 
alog in effect at the time of admission or 
readmission (whichever is more current) to 
a particular Health Professions program.' 
Armstrong State College, however, re- 
serves the right to change any provision 
listed in this catalog, including but not lim- 
ited to academic requirements for gradu- 
ation, without actual notice to individual 
students. If students have been absent 
from the College for two or more consec- 
utive years, they should expect to meet all 
requirements in effect at the time of return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work 
counted toward a degree may consist of 
courses taken by correspondence, exten- 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



53 



sion, or examination. No correspondence 
courses may be used to meet the require- 
ments in the major field or related fields for 
the Bachelor's degree or in English com- 
position or foreign language. No corres- 
pondence courses may be taken while a 
student is enrolled, without prior approval 
of the appropriate Dean and the head of 
the department in which the student is ma- 
joring. 

5. By State law, each student who receives a 
diploma or certificate from a school sup- 
ported by the State of Georgia must dem- 
onstrate proficiency in United States 
History and Government and in Georgia 
History and Government. A student at Arm- 
strong State College may demonstrate 

• such proficiency by: 

A. Examinations. Students may take 
either the relevant CLEP, College 
Board Admissions Testing Program 
Achievement Test, or Advanced 
Placement Test. 

B. Credit in certain courses. For U.S. and 
Georgia government - Political Sci- 
ence 113; for U.S. and Georgia History 
- History 251 or 252 or any upper di- 
vision course in U.S. History. 

6. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a 
student must earn at Armstrong at least 45 
quarter hours of credit applicable toward 
the degree. Additionally, the student must 
complete successfully at Armstrong at least 
half of the upper division credits required 
in the major field of study. For students in 
teacher education programs, the major 
field of study is the teaching field. For the 
Associate Degree, the student must com- 
plete at least 45 quarter hours of course 
work at Armstrong State College. Arm- 
strong students enrolled in the cooperative 
degree programs with Savannah State Col- 
lege in Business Education. Industrial Arts 
Education, and Trade and Industrial Edu- 
cation may be exempted from these re- 
quirements by a recommendation of the 
Dean of the School of Arts, Sciences and 
Education, concurrence by the Education 
Curriculum Committee and approval of the 
Committee on Academic Standing. 

7. For graduation the student must earn an 
overall average of 2.0 or better considering 
work taken at all colleges, computed in 
such manner that a course will be counted 



only once, regardless of the number of 
times that it has been repeated The grade 
earned in the last attempt will determine the 
number of honor points assigned for grad- 
uation. Additionally, the student must earn 
a GPA of 2.0 or better in each of the follow- 
ing: 

A. all work at Armstrong 

B. All courses in the major field. 

8. To qualify for a second Armstrong bacca- 
laureate degree, a candidate must earn at 
Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of 
credit and meet all qualitative requirements 
for the degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred students 
must pay all fees and must submit to the 
Registrar a completed Application for 
Graduation two quarters before gradua- 
tion. A candidate for a degree, unless ex- 
cused in writing by the President, Vice 
President and Dean of Faculty, Vice Pres- 
ident of Student Affairs, or Dean of Aca- 
demic and Enrollment Services, must 
attend the graduation exercises at which a 
degree is to be conferred. 

10. All students must successfully complete 
the Regents' Test and must take an Exit 
Examination in their major field as may be 
stipulated as requirements for graduation 
Candidates for a second baccalaureate 
degree are exempted from the Regents' 
Test requirement. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia 
requires as a Core Curriculum for all baccalau- 
reate degree programs the following minimum 
number of quarter hours in the major areas of 
study. 

Hours 

Area I 

Humanities, including, but not limited to, 
grammar & composition & literature 20 

Area II 

Mathematics & the natural sciences, 
including, but not limited to, 
mathematics and a 10-hour sequence 
of laboratory courses in the biological 
or physical sciences 20 

Area III 

Social Sciences, including, but not limited 
to. history & American government 20 



54 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV 

Courses appropriate to the major field of 
the individual student 



30 



TOTAL 90 
In addition to the University System Core Cur- 
riculum requirements" as outlined above, Arm- 
strong State College requires six quarter hours 
in physical education as part of all baccalau- 
reate degree programs. 

Requirements 

The student in any baccalaureate degree pro- 
gram at Armstrong State College must complete 
the following specific Core Curriculum require- 
ments. Consult the relevant departmental sec- 
tion for a complete statement of degree 
requirements for a specific program. Certain 
courses in the Core Curriculum may be ex- 
empted with credit awarded. 

Hours 

Area I 

.Humanities 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One of the following courses: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273, MUS 200, 

PHI 201, ENG 222 5 

Area II 

Mathematics & the Natural Sciences 20 

One course from MAT 101, 103, 

or 206, and an additional 

course from MAT 103, 195, 

206, 207, 220, or 290 10 

One of the following course sequences: 

BIO 101 or 111, 102 or 112 

CHE 121, 122 

CHE 128, 129 

PHY 211, 212 

PHY 217, 218 

PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 

Social Sciences 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: 

PSY 1 01 , SOC 201 , ANT 201 , ECO 

201 or 202, GEO 212 5 

Area IV 

Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Art 

ART 111, 112, 201, 202, 213 25 

MUS200 5 



Art Education 

ART 111, 112, 201, 213 20 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

Biology 
SCI and/or MAT electives (100-200 

level) or any foreign language 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

BOT 203 and ZOO 204 10 

Biology Education 

CHE128 5 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

BOT 203 and ZOO 204 10 

One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 

228 5 

Business Education 

ACC211, 212 10 

EDN200 5 

BAD201 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 200, 
271, 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 5 
Chemistry* 

CHE 128, 129, 211 15 

MAT206 5 

PHY213or219 5 

One course selected from: 
Computer Science, Mathematics 

or Natural Science 5 

Chemistry Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

CHE 211 5 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 200, 
271 , 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 5 
Computer Science 

CS 142, 231, 242 15 

MAT 206, 207, 260 15 

Criminal Justice 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290 20 

One course selected from: ANT 201 , 
ECO 201, 202, DRS 228, PSY 101, 

SOC 201 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Dental Hygiene Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

CHE 121, 122 10 

DRS228 5 

PSY 101, or SOC 201 5 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



55 



I rama/Speech 

I Any foreign language 101, 102, 103, 
and 201 20 

DRS227and 228 10 

arly Elementary Education 

EDN200, 202 10 

DRS228 5 

GEO 211 or 212 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

PSY 101 5 

nglish 

Any foreign language 101, 102 

103, 201 20 

CS 115, and one of the following: 
ART 200, 271, 272, 273, MUS 200, 

PHI 201, ENG222 10 

nglish Education 

. Any foreign language sequence 15 

DRS228 5 

EDN200 5 

PSY 101 5 

General Studies 

Two courses selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273, ENG 222, 
MUS 200, PHI 201, any two 
foreign language courses through 
200 level 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

One or two course selected from: 
ANT 201 , CS 1 1 5, 1 20, 1 42 ECO 

201, 202, PSY 101, SOC 201 5-10 

One or two courses selected from: 

BIO 101, 102, 111, 112, BOT203, 
CHE 121, 122, 128, 129, 201, 202, 
211, PHY 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 
219, PHS 121, 122, ZOO 204, 208, 

209 5-10 

Health and Physical Education 

EDN 200, DRS 228, PSY 101 15 

PE 117, PEM 250, 252; H.S. 261, 262 15 
Health Science 

HS 100 5 

HIS 150 & HIS 251 or 252 10 

PSY 101 5 

ZOO 208, 209 10 

History 

Any foreign language 102, 103 10 

HIS 251, 252 10 

Two courses selected from: ANT 
201, ECO 201, GEO 211, 212, 
MAT 220, PSY 101, SOC 201 10 



Industrial Arts Education 

DRS228 5 

EDN200 5 

IAE 201, 202, 203 15 

PSY 101 5 

Mathematical Sciences 

CS 142 5 

MAT 206, 207 10 

Two of the following 10 

MAT 208; CS 242, 260 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Mathematics Education 

EDN200 5 

*A foreign language sequence is recom- 
mended. 

MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 200. 
271 , 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 .... 5 
Medical Technology 

BIO 101 or 111 5 

ZOO208 5 

Electives in Biology, Chemistry and/or 

Computer Science 20 

(Must contain at least 1 Biology or Zo- 
ology course which completes a 10 
hour sequence, and 1 Chemistry 
course.) 

Middle School Education 

DRS 228 5 

EDN 200 5 

GEO 211 or 212 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

PSY 101 5 

EDN 240 2 

CS 296 3 

Music* 

MUS (Theory) 111, 112, 113, 211, 

212, 213 18 

MUS (Applied) 140, 240 12 

Music Education 

EDN 200 5 

MUS 111, 112, 113, 140, 236, 281 20 

PSY 101 5 

Nursing 

BIO 210 5 

PSY 295 5 

SOC 201 5 

ZOO 208, 209, 215 15 



56 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Physics Education 

BIO 101, 102 10 

EDN 200 5 

PHY213or219 5 

PSY 101 5 

One course selected from: ART 200, 
271 , 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 5 

Physical Science 

PHY 211, 212, 213 or 

PHY 217, 218, 219 15 

MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

Political Science 

Any foreign language sequence 
101, 102, 103, or CS 115, 142, and 

231 15 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

ECO 201 , GEO 1 1 1 , HIS 251 or 252, 
PSY 101, SOC 201 10 

Psychology* 

ANT 201 5 

BIO 101, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 220 5 

PSY 101 5 

Social Science Education 

EDN 200 5 

PSY 101 5 

Any foreign language or computer 

science sequence 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 

271 , 272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 5 
Social Science Education - History 

EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273, DRS 228, MUS 200 5 

Approved language sequence 
through 103 15 

Social Sciences Education - Political Science 

EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Approved electives 15 

Social Studies Education - Broad Fields (His- 
tory) 

EDN 200 5 

One course from: ANT 201, ECO 

201, GEO 211, SOC 201 5 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Approved language sequence 
through 103 15 



Social Studies Education - Broad Fields (Po- 
litical Science) 

EDN 200 i 

One course from: ANT 201; ECO 
201, 202; any GEO course; SOC 

201 .' 9 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 I 

Approved language sequence 
through 103 1! 

Social Work (major is under de-activation) 

HIS 252 i 

SOC 201 I 

SW250 I 

Any foreign language sequence 
1 01 , 1 02, 1 03 or PHI 201 , ANT 201 , 
and one five hour social science 
elective (100-200 level) M 

Speech Correction 

PSY 101, 202 1( 

EDN 200, EXC220 1( 

HIS 251 or 252 ! 

One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273, MUS 200, DRS 228 ., ! 

Trade and Industrial Education 

DRS 228 ! 

EDN 200 I 

PSY 101 j 

TIE 100, 200, 210 1 

Area V 

Physical Education Requirements 

■ PE 103 or 108, and 117 or 166 

(Student should check his program 

of study.) 
Three courses selected from: PE 
100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 
109, 200, 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 
207, 208, 209. 

MIL203, 206 

(If MIL 203 is elected, total hours total four.; 

Total Core Curriculum Hours 96-9 

Students should complete all core curriculum 
requirements during their freshmen/ 
sophomore years. 

*A foreign language sequence is recoms 

mended. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



57 



legents' Testing Program 

Each institution of the University System of 
eorgia shall assure the other institutions, and 
ie System as a whole, that students obtaining 
degree from that institution possess certain 
linimum skills of reading and writing. The Re- 
ents' Testing Program has been developed to 
3lp in the attainment of this goal. The objectives 
I the Testing Program are: (1) to provide Sys- 
;mwide information on the status of student 
ompetence in the areas of reading and writing; 
id (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying 
lose students who fail to attain the minimum 
ivels of competence in the areas of reading 
nd writing. 

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree 
rograms leading to the baccalaureate degree 
nail pass the Regents' Test as a requirement 
>r graduation. Students must take the Test in 
ie quarter after they have completed 60 quarter 
redit hours if they have not taken it previously, 
ach institution shall provide an appropriate 
rogram of remediation and shall require stu- 
ents who have earned 75 quarter credit hours 
nd have not passed the Test to enroll in the 
ppropriate remedial course or courses until 
ley pass the Test. Students with 60 or more 
ollege-level credit hours transferring from Sys- 
3m programs that do not require the Regents' 
est or from institutions outside the System shall 
ake the Test during their initial quarter of en- 
ollment in a program leading to the baccalau- 
eate degree and in subsequent quarters shall 
)e subject to all provisions of this policy. 

The Regents' Test is not a requirement for an 
\ssociate of Applied Science Degree or an As- 
ociate of Science degree in an allied health 
leld, although institutions may choose to require 
he Test for these degrees. (Armstrong State 
College has chosen to require the Test of all 
jndergraduates who have not earned a bac- 
calaureate or higher degree regardless of de- 
cree objective.) 

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher 
degree from a regionally accredited institution 
}f higher education will not be required to com- 
Dlete the Regents' Test in order to receive a 
degree from a University System institution. 

The Chancellor will issue administrative pro- 
cures for the operation of the Regents' Testing 
D rogram. (A copy of Regents' Testing Program 
Administrative Procedures is available from the 
Office of Student Affairs, Room 11, Administra- 
tion Building.) 



According to "Regents' Testing Program 
Administration Procedures" institutions may in- 
crease requirements related to the Regents' 
Testing Program "provided that such increased 
requirements are authorized by the Chancellor 
and ... published in the official catalog of the 
institution prior to implementation." 

Testing and Remediation 
Requirements 

Students attending Armstrong State College 
are urged to take the Regents' Test during their 
first quarter of enrollment after the quarter in 
which the 45th credit hour is earned. For the 
purpose of enforcing Regents' Testing Program 
Policy, enrolled students are identified by com- 
puter-printed notices on end-of-quarter grade 
reports and transfers through the processes of 
admission and transcript evaluation. Students 
register for the Test at the Office of Student Af- 
fairs within the publicized test registration 
period. 

Students who are scheduled to take the 
writing portion of the Regents' Test must first 
attend a one-hour Regents' Test Prep Ses- 
sion sponsored by the Armstrong Writing 
Center. This requirement applies only to stu- 
dents who are taking the test for the first time. 
Students who seek exemption from the Prep 
Session requirements must consult with the 
Head of the Department of Languages, Litera- 
ture, and Dramatic Arts. Only those students 
who have completed composition courses with 
an average grade of B or better may be 
exempted. 

Students who neglect to take the Regents' 
Test until their first quarter of enrollment after the 
quarter in which the 60th credit hour is earned 
may be barred from all phases of registration 
until after Test scores are posted. 

Regardless of credit hours earned, students 
who do not pass the Regents' Test may be re- 
quired by Armstrong State College to take re- 
medial courses before they retake the Regents' 
Test. In accordance with Regents' Testing Pro- 
gram Policy, students who have not passed the 
Test and who have earned 75 quarter hours 
must take remedial courses, whether or not they 
have attempted the test. 

Students who fail the reading portion of the 
Regents' Test and who have less than 75 hours 
earned with an adjusted GPA of 2 5 or better 
may appeal the requirement for Developmental 



58 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Studies Reading 025 (Developing Reading Ma- 
turity) to the Dean of Academic and Enrollment 
Services. 

Students who fail the essay portion of the Test 
and have less than 75 hours earned with an 
adjusted GPA of 3.0 or better and a 3.0 or better 
in required core courses in English may appeal 
the requirement for English 025 (Composition 
Review) to the Head of the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Special Categories of Students 

Students whose native language is not Eng- 
lish must take the reading component of the Re- 
gents' Test, but may take a college examination 
to certify competence in writing. The college 
equivalence of the essay component of the Re- 
gents' Test is administered on the same date as 
the reading component of the Test. International 
students are allowed two hours for each test. 

Students who are handicapped may request 
additional time for the Regents' Test. 

Essay Review 

Students may request a formal review of fail- 
ure on the essay component of the Regents' Test 
if the essay received at least one passing score 
and the review is initiated in the first quarter of 
enrollment following testing and no more than 
one year from the quarter in which the failure 
occurred. Students may initiate an essay review 
at the Office of Student Affairs. 

Health Professions Program 
Requirement 

Before a student in a Health Professions pro- 
gram may enter his/her last quarter, he/she must 
have passed the Regents' examination. 

Physical Education 
Requirements 

All students who are enrolled in baccalaureate 
degree programs for ten or more quarter hours 
on the daytime schedule must adhere to Arm- 
strong Core Curriculum Area V requirements. 
Any student who holds a valid senior life saving 
certificate and/or a valid water safety instructor 
certificate and/or passes the Armstrong swim- 
ming test may be exempted from PE 103 or PE 
108. Physical education is not required of any- 
one who is beyond the age of 25 at the time of 



initial matricirlation at Armstrong or of anyone 
enrolled primarily in evening classes. 

Students should check their program of stud;; 
for P.E. 117 and/or 166 requirements. 

English and Mathematics 
Placement Tests 

During the initial quarters of enrollment at Arm- 
strong State College, students must enroll in the 
appropriate sequence of English composition 
courses until the sequence has been compietec 
and/or the Regents' Test has been passed. Stu- 
dents must not delay this sequence beyond theii 
second quarter of attendance. For assistance in 
identifying the appropriate English composition 
courses, students should consult advisors in the 
departments of their declared majors or the Of- 
fice of Admissions, or the Department of Lan- 
guages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. See 
Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts De- 
partment for further information. 

The College reserves the right to place stu- 
dents in appropriate English and mathematics 
courses in the core curriculum. Diagnostic tests 
are administered for this purpose. 

State Requirement In 
History and Government 

By State law, each student who receives c 
diploma or certificate from a school supportec 
by the State of Georgia must demonstrate pro 
ficiency in United States History and Govern 
ment and in Georgia History and Government 
A student at Armstrong State College may dem 
onstrate such proficiency by: 

A. Examinations. Students may take either th( 
relevant CLEP, College Board Admission; 
Testing Program Achievement Test, or Ad 
vanced Placement Test. 

B. Credit in certain courses. For U.S. anc 
Georgia government - Political Science 
113; for U.S. and Georgia History - Histon 
251 or 252 or any upper division course ir 
U.S. History. 

Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science 
Degrees 

Requirements for each major program lead 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a majc 
in Art, English, History, Music, Political Science 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



59 



ychology, or to the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ce with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Com- 
iter Science, or Mathematical Sciences are 
iscribed in the appropriate departmental list- 
l For the BA and the BS degrees, a minimum 
185 quarter hours, exclusive of the required 
iysical education courses, is required for 
aduation. 

Each student in one of these major programs 
jst complete the 90-hour core curriculum re- 
irement as listed above, along with the 6-hour 
ysical Education requirement. 
The student will not be allowed to take senior 
'ision courses in the major field unless he has 
minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite 
urses in that field. No major program in a de- 
rtment will require more than 60 quarter hours 
all levels in the major field, however, the de- 
rtment may recommend up to 70 quarter 
urs. 

r or its major program, a department will re- 
ire from 15 to 30 quarter hours of specific 
jrses or approved elective courses in related 
ds and may require language courses reach- 
l the degree of proficiency specified by the 
partment. Total requirements in the major and 
ated fields, may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 
Each BA or BS degree program, except those 
signed for Dental Hygiene, Medical Technol- 
y, Nursing and teacher certification, will in- 
jde a minimum of 15 hours of electives 
proved for credit within the Armstrong State 
liege curriculum. 

ssociate Degree 
Isquirements 

Each associate degree program includes as 
| rt of its curriculum the following: 

: ENG 101, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS 113 5 

One five hour course selected from 
Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate 

Core 5 

Three PE credit hours 3 

TOTAL 28 
Students in associate degree programs are 
Quired to complete successfully the Regents' 
I 'animation and may be required to take an Exit 
lamination in the appropriate area of concen- 
Ition 



Numbering System for 
Courses 

In the course listing to follow, there appear 
three numbers in parentheses after each course 
title. The first number listed indicates the number 
of hours of lecture; the second number listed 
indicates the number of hours of laboratory; the 
third number listed indicates the number of 
quarter hours of credit carried by the course. 
The letter "V" represents variable hours 

Courses numbered 0-99 carry institutional 
credit only and may not be applied to a degree 
program. Courses numbered 100-199 are gen- 
erally planned for the freshman year; courses 
numbered 200-299 for the sophomore year; 
courses numbered 300-399 for the junior year 
and course numbered 400-499 for the senior 
year. 

Courses taken to fulfill core curriculum re- 
quirements may not be used to meet other re- 
quirements of a degree program. 

Lettering System for Course 

In the course listings given in the Armstrong 
Core Curriculum requirements and in the de- 
partmental curricula which follow, there appear 
two or three letters preceding a three digit num- 
ber. Following is an exhaustive list of all abbre- 
viations used for course designation purposes 

ACC = Accounting (SSC) 
ANT = Anthropology 
ART = Art 
AST = Astronomy 

BE = Business Education (SSC) 

BAD = Business Administration (SSC) 

BIO = Biology 

BOT = Botany 

BSN = Baccalaureate Nursing 

CJ = Criminal Justice 

CL = Comparative Literature 

CS = Computer Science 

CHE - Chemistry 

DH = Dental Hygiene 

DRS = Drama and Speech 

DSE = Development Studies English 

DSM = Dev Studies Math 

DSR = Dev Studies Reading 

DSS = Dev Studies Study Techniques 



60 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ECE 


= Early Childhood Education 


MAT 


= Mathematics 


ECO 


= Economics 


MET 


= Meterology 


EDN 


= Education 


METc 


= Mechanical Engineering Technology 


EEE 


= Early Elementary Education 




(SSC) 


EGR 


= Engineering 


MIL 


= Military Science 


ENG 


= English 


MSN 


= Nursing (Master's) 


ENT 


= Entomotogy 


MPS 


= Museum/Preservation Studies 


ETc 


= Engineering Technology (SSC) 


MUS 


= Music 


EXC 


= Exceptional Children 










NSc 


= Naval Science 


FLM 


= Film 


NUR 


= Nursing (Associate) 


FRE 


= French 










OAD 


= Office Administration (SSC) 


GEL 


= Geology 


OCE 


= Oceanography 


GEO 


= Geography 






GER 


= German 


PA 


= Public Administration 






PE 


= Physical Education 


HE 


= Health Education 


PEM 


= Physical Education Major 


HS 


= Health Science 


PHI 


= Philosophy 


HIM 


= Health Information Management 


PHS 


= Physical Science 


HIS 


= History 


PHY 


= Physics 






POS 


= Political Science 


IAE 


= Industrial Arts Education (SSC) 


PSY 


= Psychology 


JRN 


= Journalism 


RT 


= Respiratory Therapy 






RAD 


= Radiologic Technologies 


LM 


= Library Media 






LS 


= Library Science 


SOC 


= Sociology 


LAT 


= Latin 


SPA 


= Spanish 


LIN 


= Linguistics 










TIE 


= Trade and Industrial Education (SSC 


MH 


= Mental Health 






MT 


= Medical Technoloav 


ZOO 


= Zoology 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 61 



)EGREE PROGRAMS 

ie degree programs of Armstrong State College are presented in this catalog by school, by 
apartment. The College is organized into two schools, each administered by a dean, and two 
)n-school affiliated departments. The degrees offered in each school and the departments in 
hich they are offered are listed below: 

School of Arts, Sciences, and Education 

egree Department 

isociate of Arts Fine Arts 

ssociate of Applied Science 

CnminalJustice Government 

Early Childhood Education Education 

achelor of Arts 

Art' Fine Arts 

Drama/Speech Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

English Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

History History 

Music Fine Arts 

Political Science Government 

Psychology Psychology 

achelor of General Studies Interdepartmental 

achelor of Music Education Fine Arts 

achelor of Science 

Biology Biology 

Chemistry Chemistry and Physics 

Computer Science Mathematics and Computer Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

Mathematical Sciences Mathematics and Computer Science 

Physical Science Chemistry and Physics 

achelor of Science in Education 

Early Elementary Education Education 

Middle School Education Education 

Secondary Education 

Art Education Education 

Biology Education Education 

Broad Field Social Studies Education 

'Business Education Education 

Chemistry Education Education 

English Education Education 

'Industrial Arts Education Education 

Mathematics Education Education 

Music Education Education 

Physics Education Education 

Social Science Education Education 

Speech Correction Education 

'Trade/Industrial Education Education 

aster of Arts 

History History 

aster of Education 

Early Elementary Education Education 

Elementary Education Education 

Middle School Education Education 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Secondary Education 

Business Education Educatio 

English Educatie 

Mathematics Educatie 

Science Education Educatio 

Social Studies Educatio 

Special Education.' : Educatio 

Behavior Disorders Educatio 

Learning Disabilities Educatio 

Speech/Language Pathology Educatio 

Master of Science 

Criminal Justice Governmer 

School of Health Professions 

Degree Departmer 

Associate of Science 

Dental Hygiene Dental Hygien 

Nursing Associate Degree Nursin 

Radiologic Technologies Radiologic Technologic 

Respiratory Therapy Respiratory Therac 

Bachelor of Science in Education Health Science, Physical Educatior 

and Recreatio 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Dental Hygien 

Dental Hygien 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Medical Technoloc 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursin 

Master of Health Science Health Science, Physical Educatioi 

and Recreatic 

Master of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursir 

'Offered in conjunction with Savannah State College 




Graduate Programs 



64 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic 
Policies and 
Information 
History 

The development of graduate education at 
Armstrong State College is linked to a history of 
graduate course offerings in Savannah which 
has involved several institutions of the University 
System of Georgia. Prior to 1968, only off-cam- 
pus extension courses from the University of 
Georgia and other institutions were offered in 
Savannah. In the summer of 1968, Savannah 
State College began offering courses in resi- 
dence for their new master's degree in elemen- 
tary education. This program was accredited by 
the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools and was approved by the Georgia State 
Board of Education. 

In the Fall of 1971, Armstrong State College 
and Savannah State College joined efforts to 
offer a joint program of graduate work. The com- 
bined faculties, library holdings, and facilities of 
the Colleges made possible the expansion of 
the graduate program to include a Master of 
Business Administration Degree Program; to 
add secondary options in the Master of Edu- 
cation degree program; and to supersede most 
of the off-campus courses offered in Savannah 
by other institutions. This Joint Graduate Studies 
Program of Savannah State College and Arm- 
strong State College was fully accredited by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, 
with its degree programs in education approved 
by the Georgia State Department of Education. 

Effective Fall, 1979, the Joint Graduate Stud- 
ies Program was terminated by action of the 
Board of Regents, and Armstrong was author- 
ized to continue its graduate offerings with a 
significant modification. All business administra- 
tion programs, courses, and faculty were trans- 
ferred to Savannah State College, and 
simultaneously, all teacher education programs, 
courses, and faculty were transferred to Arm- 
strong State College. 

In Winter, 1981, the Master of Health Science 
program was established. In Fall, 1 981 , the Mas- 
ter of Science degree with a major in Criminal 
Justice was approved by the Board of Regents. 
The graduate course work for the MS in Criminal 
Justice Program was initiated in the Fall quarter 
1982. Specialist in Education Degree programs 
in Elementary, Special, and Secondary Educa- 



tion were offered from Fall, 1984 through Fan 
1988. The graduate program leading to an M.A'i 
in History was initiated in the Spring Quarter! 
1985. 

Purpose 

The Graduate Program of Armstrong Stat] 
College is dedicated to service through edii 
cational programs, community involvement, an! 
faculty and student research, scholarship an 
creativity. By offering advanced preparation t 
those who serve in the schools and in othd 
professional activities, the program contribute 
to the development of professional people, an 
through them, to the well being of those whorl 
these professionals serve. The philosophy of th 
Graduate Program affirms the dignity and wort] 
of individuals and the realization that profes 
sional men and. women. must be productive, a 
ticulate, and pro-active. 

Degrees and Degree 
Coordinators 

Armstrong State College offers the degree 
of: Master of Arts, Master of Education, Mast* 
of Health Science and Master of Science, 9 
fields of study noted below. The specification 
for each of the degree programs are presente 
in the departmental sections where the prograi 
coordinator is located. 

Criminal Justice - Master of Science 
Coordinator, Dr. Dennis Murphy 

Education - Master of Education 
Majors and coordinators for M.Ed. Program: 
Business Education, Dr. Lloyd Newberry 
Early Elementary Education, Dr. Lloyd 

Newberry 
English, Dr. Robert Strozier 
Mathematics, Dr. Dale Kihefner 
Middle School Education, Dr. Lloyd 

Newberry 
Science Education, Dr. Lloyd Newberry 
Social Studies, Dr. Lloyd Newberry 
Special Education, Dr. Lloyd Newberry 

Behavior Disorders 

Learning Disabilities 

Speech/Language Pathology 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



65 



lealth Science - Master of Health Science 
Concentrations available: 
Administration 
Computer Science 
Education 
Health Education 
Public Policy 
J Coordinator, Dr. Emma Simon 

■ ursing - Master of Science 
c Coordinator, Dr. Marilyn Buck 



oordinators by Department: 

!Dr. Dale Kilhefner, Mathematics/Computer 
cience 
j Dr. Dennis Murphy, Government 
] Dr. Marilyn Buck, Baccalaureate Nursing 
Dr. Emma Simon, Health Science, Physical 
ducation, Recreation 
Dr. Lloyd Newberry, Education 
Dr. Robert Strozier, Languages, Literature, 
ramatic Arts 



ADMISSIONS 



tequirements — Masters Level 

Applicants desiring admission en a degree- 
sekmg status must present satisfactory under- 
r aduate academic records and satisfactory 
:ores on appropriate admissions examina- 
)ns. Some of the graduate degree programs 
ave specialized test requirements, specified 
idergraduate course requirements, or other 
tquirements for degree-seeking students. Re- 
r to the departmental sections for specific in- 
rmation on these requirements. 
General requirements for degree-seeking stu- 
3nts include the following: applicants for all 
aster of Education programs must provide sat- 
factory scores on either the General Test of the 
raduate Record Examination (GRE) or the 
iller Analogies Test (MAT). Satisfactory un- 
9rgraduate grades must be presented by all 
3gree-seekmg students. Applicants for the 
aster of Health Science program must provide 
Jtisfactory scores on either the Graduate Re- 
xd Exams (GRE), the Graduate Management 
dmissions Test (GMAT), or the Miller Analogies 
?st (MAT). Applicants for the MS Degree in 
riminal Justice must provide a satisfactory 
x>re on the General Test of the Graduate Re- 
)rd Exams (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test 



(MAT). Applicants for the M.A. Degree in History 
must provide satisfactory scores on both the 
General and the History Subject Tests of the 
Graduate Record Exams (GRE) Applicants for 
the M.S. Degree in Nursing must provide a sat- 
isfactory score on the General Tests of the Grad- 
uate Records Exams (GRE). 

Admission to some programs may require sat- 
isfactory scores on either the appropriate Spe- 
cialty Area of the NTE or the appropriate Subject 
Test of the GRE. For details of such require- 
ments, consult the appropriate departmental en- 
try in the Catalog or the Department Head. 

Applications for the above examinations are 
usually available at the College and will be given 
to students who come to the College to obtain 
them. Students who wish to write for an appli- 
cation form or to submit an application for the 
GRE or GMAT should contact: Educational Test- 
ing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540. Stu- 
dents who wish to take the MAT should contact 
the appropriate Dean's office. Students should 
request that their test scores be sent to the Grad- 
uate Admissions Office, Armstrong State Col- 
lege, Savannah, Georgia 31419-1997. 

Categories of Admission 
Regular Degree Status 
Definition 

Regular Admission means that a student has 
met all admission requirements and is admitted 
to a degree program with full graduate status. 



Requirements 



A student who has earned a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college, who has 
completed all of the prerequisites for his 
planned graduate field of study, and who meets 
the other requirements of the Graduate Program 
may be admitted on Regular Admission status 
These requirements include minimum under- 
graduate grade-point averages in combination 
with certain minimum test scores. 

For M.Ed, programs, a minimum GPA of 2.5 
and a minimum test score of 44 on the MAT or 
800 on the GRE General Test are required 

For the M.H.S. program, a minimum GPA of 
2.5, and a minimum test score of 800 on the 
GRE, or 40 on the MAT are required For further 
information, consult with the Coordinator of the 
Health Science Program. 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



For the Criminal Justice M.S. program, a min- 
imum GPA of 2.5 and a minimum test score of 
either 900 on the General Test of the GRE or 51 
on the MAT are required. For further information 
consult with the Head of the Department of Gov- 
ernment. 

For the M.A. in History program, a minimum" 
GPA of 3.0 (both overall and in history courses) 
and GRE scores of 1000 in the General and 500 
in the History Subject Tests are required. For 
further information consult with the coordinator 
of the History Graduate Program. 

For the M.S. in Nursing program, a minimum 
GPA of 2.5 and a minimum test score of 850 on 
the General Test of the GRE are required. For 
further information consult with the Coordinator 
of the MSN Program. 

Degree programs providing teacher certifi- 
cation have other admission requirements, in- 
cluding: (1) a recommendation from the school 
in which a student has been employed as a 
teacher or has completed a student internship, 
and (2) eligibility for fourth level certification in 
the field of study. (For further information on ad- 
mission to certification programs, consult the Of- 
fice of the Dean of Arts, Sciences, and 
Education.) 



Provisional Degree Status 
Definition 

Provisional Admission means that a student 
has applied for admission to a degree program 
and has some condition affecting his status such 
as low grades or test scores. The student is 
admitted to a degree program but must meet 
certain conditions before achieving full graduate 
status (i.e., Regular Admission). 



Requirements 



For Provisional Admission, a student must 
hold a baccalaureate degree and meet the other 
admission requirements of the Graduate Pro- 
gram. These requirements include minimum un- 
dergraduate grade point averages in 
combination with certain minimum test scores. 

For the Master of Education programs, stu- 
dents who fail to meet Regular Admission may 
be granted Provisional Admission if the combi- 
nations of their GPA and test scores conform to 
the following formulas: 



(GPA x 100) + (MAT x 10) = 560 or more 

(GPA x 100) + (GRE General) = 1000 or 

more 

In no case, however, may the GPA be less 
than 2.2, the MAT less than 31 , or the GRE less 
than 700. 

For the M.H.S., Criminal Justice, and M.S.N 
Programs, students who fail to meet Regular Ad- 
mission score requirements may be grantee 
Provisional Admission if the combinations o 
their GPA and test scores conform to estab 
lished formulas. 

For the M.A. in History program, the minimurr 
GRE requirement for Provisional Admission is 
800 for the General Test and 450 for the History 
Subject Test. The GPA requirement is 2.5 overai 
and 2.75 in history. For further information, con 
suit with the coordinator of the. History Graduate 
Program. 

For area test scores required by any depart 
ment, see the appropriate departmental entry. 

Additional Stipulations for 
Provisional Admission 

As with Regular Admission, recommendatior 
forms and other aspects of the Admissions Pro 
cedures must be adhered to. 

Provisionally admitted students may be re 
quired to remove any specific deficiencies tha 
are ascertained by taking undergraduate sup 
porting courses before these students are al 
lowed to attempt graduate courses within tht 
program to which they have been admitted. Stu 
dents may remain admitted on a provisional ba 
sis until they have attempted 15 hours o 
approved graduate work in residence. If the 
satisfactorily complete the initial, approved M 
hours of graduate work with no grade less thar 
a "B" — of which 10 hours must be in the profes 
sional sequence — and submit the NTE Specialty 
test score, if required, these students may sub 
mit a written request to move into Regular status 

Upon satisfying the NTE Specialty test score 
if required, and upon completing 25 hours o 
approved course work in residence with a "B 
average or better, of which 15 hours must be ir: 
the major field of study, any provisionally ad 
mitted student will be eligible for Regular status 
If the student does not have a "B" average o 
better upon completing these 25 hours of course 
work, he or she will be dropped as a degree 
seeking student and prohibited from enrolling if 
further graduate courses. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



67 



>ost Baccalaureate and Post 
Sraduate — Non-degree Status 

Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate ad- 
lission are provided for those students who 
lay not wish to pursue a graduate degree, in- 
luding teachers whose main purpose is to ob- 
lin credits necessary for teacher certification 
nd/or for students who may desire to enter a 
egree program but who have missing data, 
equirements for Post Baccalaureate Admis- 
lon include documentary evidence of a bac- 
alaureate degree and submission of necessary 
pplication papers. The student must also have 
) meet specific prerequisites to enroll in 
ourses in certain departments. Post Graduate 
.dmission requirements are the same except 
lat a graduate degree is required. 

No more than fifteen graduate hours earned 
'hile enrolled as a Post Graduate or Post Bac- 
alaureate student may be applied toward a 
taster's degree. 

A student admitted on non-degree status who 
'ishes to be advanced to a degree status cat- 
gory of admission bears the responsibility for: 

1. Meeting all requirements for degree status 
which are in effect at the time the student 
submits the required data and documents 
for degree status. 

2. Notifying the appropriate Dean in writing of 
the intent and desire to advance to degree 
status. 

Action by the Dean to advance a non-degree 
fudent to a degree status category is contin- 

nt on the student meeting the above respon- 
bilities, and the student is cautioned to 

intain a careful check on his or her status. 



ransient Students Entering 
rmstrong 

[Transient students must arrange to have writ- 
h authorization sent to the appropriate Dean 
In their dean, department head, or registrar 
Ihe graduate school in which they are enrolled 
fcrder to be accepted as a transient student 
|i to register in the Graduate Program. They 
| st also submit the application for admission 
tn and the $10 fee as described in the Ad- 
fcon Procedures If they wish to become de- 
fe-seeking students, they must request 
J&ropnate admission in writing and must sub- 
it the necessary documents 



Readmission 

Any student in the Graduate Program who did 
not matriculate (i.e.. register) during the quarter 
immediately preceding the quarter in which he 
next intends to matriculate must process a read- 
mission form with the Registrar's Office. The only 
students exempted from this requirement are 
those students who are initially admitted for 
graduate study in the quarter immediately pre- 
ceding the quarter of their first matriculation. For 
further information, inquire at the Office of the 
Registrar. 

Procedures 

All admission documents should be sent to 
the Graduate Admissions Office. These include 
the application and the ten dollar fee. Tran- 
scripts should reach the Graduate Admissions 
Office twenty days prior to registration. 

The following materials and procedures are 
part of the requirements for admission to the 
Graduate Program. 

1. The application-for-admission form, avail- 
able in the offices of the Deans, must be 
completed and submitted Required of all 
applicants twenty days prior to registration 

2. Two official transcripts showing all college 
credits earned for the undergraduate de- 
gree should be sent directly from the col- 
lege which awarded the degree to the 
appropriate Dean's office. Required of all 
applicants except transient students who 
may submit letter of authorization from their 
graduate school twenty days prior to reg- 
istration. 

3. Test scores, as appropriate and as re- 
quired for the major, must be submitted 
Required of degree-seeking students only 

4. Completed recommendation forms must be 
submitted; these forms are available in the 
appropriate Dean's office For applicants 
entering teacher certification programs, at 
least one recommendation must be from 
supervisory personnel who observed the 
student in a teaching internship or as an 
employed teacher These recommenda- 
tions are required of degree-seeking stu- 
dents only 

5 A ten dollar application fee is required 
Graduates of Armstrong State College are 
exempt from the application fee. 

6 A letter of confirmation will be sent upon 
receipt of a completed graduate applica- 



6a 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tion. This letter of confirmation, which lists 
academic program and advisor, will be 
necessary for advisement purposes. 
Admission to graduate study does no imply 
automatic acceptance of the student as a can- 
didate for any Master's degree. See section on 
candidacy for degree. 

Requirements for 
Admission to Specific 
Programs 

Criminal Justice (M.S.) 

While an undergraduate degree in criminal 
justice is not a prerequisite to admission, it is 
essential that each student pursuing the M.S. in 
Criminal Justice have adequate preparation. 
Therefore, students who lack the necessary 
background may be required to complete ad- 
ditional undergraduate coursework. 

Students entering the M.S. in Criminal Justice 
Program must meet the general requirements of 
the College and the following: 

For Regular Admission —Students must 
have earned a minimum of 2.5 undergraduate 
grade point average on all work attempted dur- 
ing the last 90 quarter hours (or 60 semester 
hours), and must present a minimum score of 
either 

(a) 900 on the General Test of the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE), or 

(b) 51 on the Miller Analogies Test 
(MAT). 

For Provisional Admission — If students fail 
to meet either the minimum undergraduate 
grade point average or entrance test require- 
ments for Regular admission they may be con- 
sidered for Provisional admission if either 

(a) the undergraduate grade point av- 
erage (last 90/60 hours) multiplied by 
100 and added to the score on the 
General Test of the GRE equals 
1050, or 

(b) the undergraduate grade point av- 
erage (last 90/60 hours) multiplied by 
100 and added to the Miller Analo- 
gies Test (MAT) score multiplied by 
10 equals 650. 

In no event may the undergraduate grade 
point average (last 90/60 hours) be less than 
2.2, the score on the General Test of the GRE 
be less than 750, or the score on the Miller Anal- 
ogies Test be less than 37. 



Education (MEd) 

Students entering the early elementary, mid 
die school, secondary and the special educa 
tion programs must satisfy all general admissioi 
requirements of the Graduate Program. Stul 
dents in MEd certification programs in early e 
ementary, middle school, secondary educatior 
and speech and language pathology must als^ 
be eligible for fourth level (NT4) certification ii 
the intended master's level teaching field. 

Business Education (MEd) 

Students entering the MEd program in Busi 
ness Education must meet the general admis 
sion requirements of the Graduate Program an< 
must take and make a minimum score of 560 pi 
the Business Education Specialty Area Test c 
the National Teacher Examinations (NTE). Stt; 
dents may be provisionally admitted to the pre 
gram if their Business Education Specialty Are 
Test of the NTE is not less than 540. 

Science Education (MEd) 

Students entering the MEd program in Sc 
ence Education must meet the general admis 
sion requirements of the Graduate Program. an , 
must take the Science Education Specialty Are 
Test of the National teacher Examinations (NTE 
in order to qualify for degree-seeking status. 

Health Science (MHS) 

Students entering the MHS program mus 
meet the general admission requirements of th 
Graduate Program and must score 800 on th 
Graduate Record Exam General Test or 450 o 
the Graduate Management Admission Test c 
40 on the Miller Analogies Test. Students whi 
fail to meet the criteria for regular admission maj 
be admitted on a provisional basis if their GP/ 
and test scores conform to established formu 
las. 

History (M.A.) 

Students entering the M.A. program in Histo 
must satisfy all general admission requiremen 
of the Graduate Program and the following: 

For Regular Admission: 

(a) 35 hours of undergraduate history 

(b) GPA of 3.0 (both overall and in hi 
tory) 

(c) GRE General Test score of 1000 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



69 



(d) GRE History Subject Test score of 
500 

(e) Prerequisite courses 
For Provisional Admission: 

(a) 25 hours of undergraduate history 

(b) GPA of 2.5 overall (2.75 in history) 

(c) GRE General Test score of 800 

(d) GRE History Subject Test score of 
450 

For specific prerequisite courses in history or 
storic preservation see the department de- 
:ription of the program. 

lathematics (MEd) 

All students entering the MEd program in 
athematics must satisfy all general admission 
iquirements of the Graduate Program, must 
ke the NTE Specialty Area Test in Mathematics 
• the GRE Subject Test in Mathematics, and 
iust satisfy a prerequisite of 25 quarter hours 
: college mathematics at or beyond the level 
: calculus, in order to obtain degree-seeking 
atus. 

To gain Regular Admission, a student must 
otain a minimum score of 580 on the NTE Spe- 
alty Area Test or 520 on the GRE Subject Test, 
o minimum is required for Provisional Admis- 
on. Students whose scores on the NTE Spe- 
ialty Area Test or the GRE Subject Test are too 
jw for Regular Admission can also gain Regular 
.dmission by passing a department entrance 
xamination. 

In order for a Provsionally Admitted student 
) gain Regular Status without passing the de- 
partmental entrance examination, the student 
pust satisfy the general requirements of the 
graduate School; including the stipulation that 
he first 25 graduate hours must be completed 
Mbi at least a "B" average, and that at least 15 
I if these hours must be in approved mathemat- 
;:s courses. 

Cursing (MSN) 

Students entering the M.S.N, program must 
•atisfy all general admission requirements of the 
graduate program and the following: 
"or. regular admission: GPA of 2.5 and GRE 
peneral Test Score of 850. 
| : or Provisional Admission: GPA x 100 + GRE 
3eneral Test Score = 1050 or more with mini- 
mum GPA of 2.0 and minimum GRE General 
,'est Score of 800. 



ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 



Graduate Student 
Responsibility 

The student is charged with the responsibility 
for taking the initiative in meeting all academic 
requirements and in maintaining a careful check 
on progress toward earning a degree. The stu- 
dent is responsible for discharging obligations 
to the business office and the library and for 
adhering to the rules and regulations appertain- 
ing to graduate students in particular and to all 
students enrolled in a unit of the University Sys- 
tem of Georgia. It is the student's responsibility 
to abide by catalog requirements. A student's 
claim that he or she has been granted an ex- 
ception to these requirements must be docu- 
mented before the merits of the claim can be 
evaluated. 

Academic Advisement 

Upon admission to graduate study, each stu- 
dent will be referred to a departmental office for 
advisor assignment. Consultation with the as- 
signed advisor is required prior to registration. 
Each student must process appropriate advise- 
ment papers which are available from his or her 
assigned advisor and which provide the advisor 
clearance required for registration. 

Transient student report to the Office of the 
appropriate dean for advisement and advisor 
clearance. 

Post Baccalaureate and Post Graduate stu- 
dents obtain advisor clearance by processing 
the non-degree advisement form with their as- 
signed advisors. During the quarter in which a 
Post Baccalaureate student achieves degree- 
seeking status, he or she must process the Pro- 
gram of Study form. 

Degree-seeking students, both Regular and 
Provisional Admission students, must process 
the Program of Study form with their assigned 
advisor no later than the end of their first quarter 
of enrollment. A temporary advisor clearance 
statement may be provided by the advisor which 
will be valid only for the student's initial regis- 
tration This temporary clearance should be 
processed on non-degree advisement form, 
with appropriate notations made to indicate that 
it is temporary. 



70 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Program of Study shows the essential 
courses the student will take, transfer courses 
that might apply to the degree, and prerequisite 
courses or other prerequisites. The Program of 
Study must be followed by the student in fulfilling 
degree requirements. However, the student can 
take courses additional to those on his Program 
of Study and may enroll in the courses on the 
Program of Study during quarters other than 
those which might be shown on his Program of 
Study form. Moreover, the student may officially 
modify his Program of Study with the concur- 
rence of his advisor and department head. 

Students should note that any departure from 
the catalog requirements for a degree must be 
approved by the appropriate dean. 

International Student 
Advisement 

Specialized advisement is available for inter- 
national students from the Graduate Interna- 
tional Student Advisor, Dr. Steve Rhee, located 
in room 108-5, Solms Hall. 

Registration 

Before a student may register for graduate 
courses, the individual must be formally admit- 
ted as a graduate student (although some 500 
and 600 level courses may be taken by qualified 
undergraduate seniors upon complying with re- 
quirements and procedures stipulated by and 
available in the Dean's Offices). If circumstan- 
ces require it, the student must be readmitted 
(see section on Admissions, paragraph on 
Readmissions). In order to register, a student 
will be required to show at registration a permit 
to register card, which must be signed by the 
advisor. 

Transfer of Credits 

Credit may be transferred from another insti- 
tuion, provided: 

1 . that only up to 1 5 hours of graduate credit 
taken while in a non-degree status may be 
applied to a degree program. 

2. that each course equates with a course in 
the curriculum of the Graduate Program or 
is an acceptable elective. 

3. that the credit was earned in an accredited 
graduate program. 

4. that a grade of B or better was earned in 
each course. 



5. that the credit was earned no more than si 
years prior to completion of all degree re 
quirements. 

6. that no more than fifty percent of the re 
quired credits shall be transferred for us 
towards a master's degree (i.e., no mor 
than 50% of either the required profession) 
education credits or other credits in th 
master's programs). M.Ed, programs lirr 
total transfer credits to 15 hours. 

Information about the amount of credit trans 
ferrable for a particular degree program, can e 
located in the appropriate departmental entry 

Procedures for Processing 
Transfer Credits 

Requests by students to receive transfe 
graduate credit must be supported by two cof 
ies of the graduate transcript showing the crec 
its requested. The formal request for receivin 
transfer credit is part of the Application for Car 
didacy which the student must process upc 
the completion of 25 hours of graduate wor! 
This application is obtained in the Graduate O 
fice. The two graduate transcripts should t 
sent to the office of the appropriate dean. 

Advisement on transfer of credit is routine 
provided on the Program of Study form whic 
every degree-seeking student must complel 
with his advisor in the first quarter of enrolimer 
Formal approval of transfer credit is granted v 
the .student's Application for Candidacy whic 
requires approval by the student's advisor,- D< 
partment Head, and appropriate dean. 

Prospective students may write to the D< 
partment Coordinator in their area of study | 
obtain advisement on transfer of credit. 

Reports and Grades 

In the Graduate Program grades assigned ai 
A, B, C, D, F, (failure), I (incomplete), W (wit-l 
drew with no penalty), and WF (withdrew failing 
The grade of W does not enter into computir 
a student's grade point average. 

Stipulations applicable to symbols used in tr 
Graduate Program include: 

I — incomplete. May be awarded (only in erne 
gency cases) by an instructor, who will also stfl 
ulate the conditions for its removal. A grade 
I must be removed by completing the course t 
midterm of the following quarter or it become 
an automatic F. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



71 



W— withdrawal without penalty. May be 
warded by an instructor up to the mid-quarter 
lenod in a course. Regents' policy stipulates 
lat "Withdrawals without penalty will not be per- 
litted after the mid-point of the total grading 
ieriod (including final examinations) except in 
ases of hardship as determined by the appro- 
bate official of the respective institutions." With- 
rawals after midterm require approval of the 
Graduate Dean. 

WF — withdrew failing. May be awarded by an 
istructor anytime that a student withdraws from 

course after the drop/add period; mandatory 
fter midquarter except for hardship cases as 
tipulated above for grades of W. 

V— audit. Use of this symbol is subject to the 
iscretion of the individual graduate depart- 
lents, and the departments may require that a 
tudent receive the permission of the instructor 
) audit a course prior to registering for the 
ourse. Moreover, an auditing student must pay 
le usual fees, must register for the course, and 
lay not transfer from audit to credit status (vice 
ersa). 

S and U — satisfactory and unsatisfactory; see 
bove. Specific courses receiving these grades 
re identified in departmental course listings. 
Jomprehensive examinations are given these 
rades also. 

K— credit by examination. Use of this symbol 
; subject to the discretion of the individual grad- 
ate departments. 

Students expecting to receive grades of V or 
j must insure that they are enrolled in an ap- 
'ropriate course or activity for which V or K 
srades are awarded by the appropriate de- 
•artment. If this catalog does not show in the 
departmental entries that the given departments 
ave authorized the use of V or K, then a student 
xpecting to receive a V in a course should ob- 
ain written verification from the appropriate in- 
tructor prior to registering for the course that V 
/ill be awarded. 

Gradepoint averages are calculated on all 
iraduate work attempted, and no credits with a 
irade below C may apply toward a degree. 

bourse Eligibility 

Courses numbered 500 through 699 are open 
d qualified Undergraduate seniors, with ap- 
>roval of their respective department heads, 
md to graduate students. In such courses, the 
quantity and quality of the work required of the 
iraduate students will be on the same level as 



that required in those courses offered exclu- 
sively for graduate students. Courses numbered 
700 and above are open only to graduate stu- 
dents. Candidates for degrees must take at least 
fifty percent of their courses at the 700 level. 



Academic Probation and 
Standing 

Any student who falls below a 3.0 (b) average 
shall be on Academic Probation. 

Any student in a degree program on Regular 
Admission status who does not achieve a 3.0 
graduate cumulative GPA after completing 25 
or more graduate hours shall be placed on Ac- 
ademic Probation and must achieve a 3.0 grad- 
uate GPA in order to return to Regular Admission 
status. Any student on Academic Probation who 
earns less than a B in any course or who ac- 
cumulates 75 hours while on Academic Proba- 
tion shall be dropped as a degree-seeking 
student and shall be placed on permanent non- 
degree status. 

Any student on Provisional Admission status 
who does not achieve a 3.0 graduate cumulative 
GPA upon completing 25 graduate hours shall 
be dropped as a degree-seeking student and 
shall be placed on permanent non-degree sta- 
tus. 

Any student on Post Baccalaureate status 
who does not achieve a 3.0 graduate cumulative 
GPA shall be placed on Academic Probation 

Any student whose graduate cumulative GPA 
falls below 2.5 after completing 25 or more hours 
shall be prohibited from taking further graduate 
work. 

Course Load & Limitation 

A full-time graduate student is defined as one 
who is registered for 10 or more graduate credit 
hours. 

A graduate student may not carry more than 
15 hours per quarter. Exceptions must be ap- 
proved in writing by the advisor. Students on 
Academic Probation or on Provisional Admis- 
sions status should carefully plan their course 
loads in consultation with their advisors. 



72 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Withdrawing; Dropping, 
Adding Courses 

Withdrawal is, in the technical sense, drop- 
ping all courses and processing a formal with- 
drawal from the College. A student may 
withdraw from school (or drop a single course) 
at any time during the quarter. Only by formally 
withdrawing, however, can a student become 
eligible for the refund of fees as explained in the 
section of fees. The student bears the respon- 
sibility of contacting the graduate office to effect 
a withdrawal and of contacting his professor(s) 
to determine what grade(s) will be assigned (W 
or WF). 

Dropping a course should be formalized 
through the Office of the Registrar which will 
process a drop/add slip. If a student is taking 
only one course, the drop is, technically, a with- 
drawal and should be treated as such. 

Adding a course may be accomplished 
through the Office of the Registrar which will 
process a drop/add slip. Courses may be added 
only during the late registration days at the be- 
ginning of the quarter and not at any other time 
during the quarter. The student must pay the 
appropriate fee for the additional course, unless 
a course equivalent in credit hours is being 
dropped simultaneously. 

Administrative Withdrawals 

The College reserves the right to effect the 
withdrawal of any student at any time during a 
course of studies if the student does not meet 
financial obligations or the required standards 
of scholarship, or if he fails in any way to meet 
the standards of the Graduate Program. 

CATES Courses 

Armstrong State College particpates in the 
Coastal Area Teacher Education Service, a con- 
sortium of area public school systems and in- 
stitutions of the University System of Georgia 
offering graduate and undergraduate courses 
in teacher education. 

A student who wishes to apply CATES course 
credit to his degree program must obtain ap- 
proval from his advisor to take a course for de- 
gree credit prior to taking the course. Without 
this prior approval, the course is subject to being 
treated as a transfer course, in which case, the 
Transfer of Graduate Credits policies and pro- 
cedures described in the catalog will be fol- 
lowed. 



Honor Code 

The Honor Code, published in the undergrad 
uate section of this catalog, applies to graduati 
students as well as undergraduate students. A 
students, graduate and undergraduate, mus 
agree to abide by the rules of the code. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Application Fee 

An application fee of $10.00 is paid by eacl 
graduate student at the time of initial applicatioi 
for admission. This fee is not required of forme 
students from either Armstrong State College c 
Savannah State College, The acceptance of th< 
application fee does not constitute acceptano 
of the student into the graduate program. Thi 
fee, which is paid at Armstrong State College 
is not refundable. 

Fee Information 

Fees for the graduate programs are the sam 
as those for the undergraduate programs. Ir 
formation on matriculation and other fees is cor 
tained in the "Financial Information" section c 
this catalog. 

Veterans Benefits 

Information of interest to veterans can be ot 
tained by writing or calling the Office of Veteran 
Affairs at Armstrong State College. 

Once accepted into the graduate program, 
veteran should contact the Veterans' Office fc 
processing instructions. Since processing tim 
varies, a first quarter student should expect i 
four to six week delay in receiving the first bene'f 
check. First quarter student veterans shouh 
consider this delay when making financial a\ 
rangements to attend school. 

For purposes of G.I. Bill benefits, ten quarte 
hours are considered to be a full load. A loa< 
of five graduate quarter hours entitles the grad 
uate student to half-time benefits. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



73 



DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

MASTERS LEVEL 



Time Limitation 

Students working toward a master's degree 
lust complete all requirements for the degree 
within a period of not more than six years from 
ie date of first enrollment. Extension of time 
nay be granted upon recommendation of the 
tudent's major department, but only in cases 
)f unusual circumstances. 

bourse and Residency 
Requirements 

Satisfactory completion of at least sixty 
quarter hours of graduate credit, thirty of which 
nust be earned in residence, is necessary for 
ill masters degrees. Courses to be counted for 
i degree may be accumulated on a full-time or 
jart-time basis. No credits with grades below 
'C" may count toward a degree. At least fifty 
Dercent of the courses for a degree must be at 
he 700 level or above. 

Students should note that the sixty-hour re- 
quirement is a minimum requirement. Degree 
students with academic weaknesses should 
ecognize that they may have to complete more 
han sixty hours to fulfill all curriculum require- 
nents and comply with all academic regula- 
10ns. 

Degree Candidacy 

Upon successful completion of twenty-five 
quarter hours of graduate work taken in resi- 
dence and at least one quarter prior to making 
application for the degree, the student is re- 
quired to file an application for admission to can- 
didacy. The student will submit the completed 
application to hs advisor. Application forms are 
available in the appropriate Dean's or depart- 
mental offices. 

Approval of the application will be based upon 
verification that the student: 

1. has been admitted to full graduate status 
(i.e., Regular Admission). 



2. has maintained a minimum of a "B" aver- 
age in all work attempted. 

3. has met any other requirements stipulated 
for his degree program. 

Application for the Degree 

At the time specified on the academic cal- 
endar, the student must file an application for 
the master's degree with the appropriate major 
department. Note that the application for the de- 
gree must be preceded by the application for 
candidacy by at least one quarter. Application 
forms are available in the appropriate Dean's or 
department offices. Applications for the degree 
should be submitted two quarters prior to the 
expected date of graduation. 

General Requirements for the 
Master's Degree 

General requirements for obtaining a master's 
degree follows: 

1 . Admission to full graduate status, i.e., Reg- 
ular Admission. 

2. Admission to candidacy for the degree. 

3. Satisfactory completion of at least sixty 
hours of approved graduate level work. 

4. Maintenance of a 3.00 GPA. 

5. Satisfactory completion of a comprehen- 
sive examination or thesis or both. 

6. Completion of an application for the degree 
at the time specified. 

For the MEd degree, the following require- 
ment applies: 
1. Satisfactory completion of certification re- 
quirements. 

M.Ed. Certification Programs 

These degrees are designed to comply with 
the requirements for teacher certification at the 
fifth year level in the various areas of speciali- 
zation. The degree ordinarily is granted only to 
students who qualify for T-5 certification (or 
equivalent certification for other states), which 
in turn entails meeting T-4 certification require- 
ments (Georgia) Students who use graduate 
credits to meet T-4 certification requirements 
may be required to take graduate courses be- 
yond the 60 hours required for the M Ed. degree 
in order to meet T-5 certification requirements 
Since the M Ed. program requires 60 hours, 
which is 15 more than the 45 minimum required 
for the T-5 by the State Education Department. 



74 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



15 of the 60 graduate hours may be used to 
fulfill T-4 certification requirements. However, 
none of the 15 hours so used can then be ap- 
plied toward meet the 45 hours specified for the 
T-5. 

Detailed information concerning programs 
and procedures relating to graduate teacher 
certification may be obtained from Education Of- 
fices. 

Thirty Hour Plan for a Second 
M.Ed. Degree 

Students who have already earned a master's 
degree can, under certain circumstances, earn 
a second master's degree in the Graduate Pro- 
gram by completing as few as 30 quarter hours 
of graduate work in residence. Essential ele- 
ments of the second master's degree plan are: 

1 . All general requirements (e.g., Regular Ad- 
mission status, adherence to general aca- 
demic regulations, "B" average, 
comprehensive examination, etc.) and all 
specific curricular requirements (i.e., de- 
partmental prerequisites for coures, spe- 
cific courses, etc.) currently applicable to 
a master's degree will apply to the second 
degree sought, except as explicity noted 
as .follows: 

2. For the Second master's degree: 

A. The student must take at least 30 
quarter hours in residence additional 
to course work that was used in ful- 
filling requirements for a previous 



master's degree. Additional hour: 
maV be necessary in order to fulfi 
curricular requirements or for sucl 
purposes as teacher certification ii 
program designed as Approved Pre 
grams for Georgia State Certif icatior 

B. ' The 30 (or more) hours in residence 

must meet existing requirements o 
recency of credit. For the other hour 
(hours applied to both the first de 
gree and to the second degree), fil 
teen hours will have no age limit, bi 
the remaining hours must be no mor 
than twelve years old when require 
ments for the second master's de 
gree are completed. 

C. A curriculum plan for a second de 
gree that is consistent with existing 
catalog plans must be prepared b 
a department head or by a graduat 
advisor with his or her departmer 
head's endorsement. A copy of thi 
plan will be sent to the Office of th 
Dean of the School of Education an< 
will be given to the student. For thi 
purpose, current advisement forms 
with appropriate modifications ma 
be used. The plan must show the 3 
(or more) hours to be taken in res 
dence and the previous graduat 
hours that are to apply to the secon 
degree. 



76 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, 
SCIENCES, AND 
EDUCATION 

Adams, Joseph V. 



Dean 



Goals and Objectives 

Through its academic programs, professional 
staff, scholarly resources, and physical facilities, 
the School of Arts, Sciences, and Education pro- 
vides opportunity for qualified students to obtain 
the best possible education attainable within the 
structure of its liberal arts and specialized de- 
gree programs. 

By means of a core curriculum in the arts and 
sciences, students are: acquainted with the di- 
versity of the intellectual and cultural achieve- 
ments of mankind; assisted in developing the 
skills necessary to think and express themselves 
clearly and creatively; and taught to understand 
and accept the responsibilties of free men and 
women in a democratic society. The liberal arts 
programs also provide scholarly and sound in- 
struction accompanied by a commitment to free 
inquiry. 

The major function of the teacher education 
programs is the preparation of competent teach- 
ers who are committed to excellence in edu- 
cation. These programs are designed to meet 
the needs of present and future education 
professionals by providing them with special- 
ized skills, knowledge of theory and methods of 
teaching, practical laboratory experiences, and 
the opportunity to create innovative ways of 
meeting the needs of every student. 

The School of Arts, Sciences, and Education 
endeavors to maintain high standards of profes- 
sional excellence among its faculty by encour- 
aging and providing opportunities for 
enrichment such as participation in educational 
seminars, conferences, workshops, and post- 
graduate study. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Arts, Sciences, and Education 
includes the departments of biology; chemistry 
and physics; elementary education; fine arts; 
government; history; languages, literature, and 
dramatic arts; mathematics and computer sci- 
ence; psychology; and secondary and special 
education. 



Undergraduate degree programs offered ir 
arts and sciences are: 
Associate in Arts 
Associate of Applied Science in 

Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in: 
Drama/Speech 
English 
History 
Music 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Science with majors in: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Applied 

Mathematics) 
Mathematical Sciences (Computer 

Science) 
Mathematical Sciences (Mathematics Ed 

ucation) 
Physical Science 
Further particulars on the undergraduate lit 
eral arts programs are found in the arts an< 
sciences departmental sections. 

Undergraduate degree programs offered i 
teacher education are: 
Associate of Applied Science with a major ir 

Early Childhood Education 
Bachelor of Arts (with teacher certificatior 
with majors in: 
English 
History 

Political Science 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Bachelor of Science in Education with major 
in: 

Early Elementary Education 
Middle School Education 
Speech Correction 

(Health, Physical Education and Recreatic 

is offered through the School of Heall 

Professions.) 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majoi 

in Secondary Education in the teaching fielc 

of: 

Art Education 
Biology Education 
Business Education 



SCHOOL OF ARTS, SCIENCES, AND EDUCATION 



77 



Chemistry Education 
English Education 
Health and Physical Education 
Industrial Arts Education 
Mathematics Education 
Music Education 
Physics Education 

Social Science Education (Broad Fields- 
History) 
Social Science Education (Broad Fields- 
Political Science) 
Social Science Education (History) 
Social Science Education (Political Sci- 
ence) 
. Trade and Industrial Education 
Bachelor of Science (with teacher certifica- 
tion) with majors in: 
Biology 
' Chemistry 

Mathematical Sciences 
Program of Study (with MS-4 teacher certifi- 
cation) in: 

Library Media 
All teacher education programs are approved 
by the Georgia State Department of Education 
and are accredited by the National Council for 
accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Further particulars on the undergraduate 
teacher education programs are found in the 
Department of Education section of this catalog. 



Minor Concentrations of Study 

The following minors are offered by depart- 
ments within the School of Arts, Sciences, and 
Education. Students may include one or more 
of these in their programs of study as circum- 
stances may permit. 

American Civilization 

Anthropology 

Art 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Drama/Speech 
' Economics 

Engineering Science 

English 

Film 

Foreign Language 

History 



Human Biology 

International Studies 

Legal Studies 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 

Mental Health 

Museum/Preservation Studies 

Music 

Organizational Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Teacher Education 

Zoology 



General Studies 

Director: Dr. Grace Martin 

Department of Psychology 



Associate and baccalaureate degree pro- 
grams in General Studies, emphasizing a liberal 
arts education, are operated under the general 
supervision of the Dean of the School of Arts, 
Sciences and Education and under the imme- 
diate direction of the head of the department of 
psychology. Curriculum guidance for these pro- 
grams is provided by the General Studies De- 
gree Committee. Interested students should 
contact the psychology department head for as- 
sistance. 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, 
a student must complete at least 30 hours of the 
required course work and 45 quarter hours of 
all coursework in this program at Armstrong 
State College. The program is designed to pro- 
vide a substantial liberal education as a base 
for upper division specialization. 

Certain courses may be exempted by ex- 
amination. 



78 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 63 

Area I ' 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; 

ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 

200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1 . Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

2. MAT 1 01 and 1 03 or 1 95 or 220 
or290 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191 or 115 or 192; 
HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. POS 113 and one course 
selected from: ANT 201 ; 
ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; 
SOC201 10 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B. Courses in the Concentration and/or 

Eiectives 30 

These courses may be specified by a 
department or may be eiectives. Stu- 
dents planning work toward a bacca- 
laureate degree should select courses 
that meet listed requirements of that 
degree program. 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 93 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

At least four quarters prior to anticipated grad- 
uation, students must submit a degree proposal 
to the Program Director for approval. 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; 

ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 

200, 201 5 



Area II.-...: 2C 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 
or290 1C 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 1C 

Area .III 2C 

1. HIS 114or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 16 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 

201 I 

Area IV 3C 

1. HIS 251 or 252 I 

2. Two courses selected from: 
ART 200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 
222; MUS 200; PHI 200, 201; 
two courses in any foreign lan- 
guage through 

the 200 level 1C 

3. One or two courses selected 
from: ANT 201; CS 115, 120, 
142; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; 
SOC 201.. 5-1C 

4. One or two courses selected 
from: 

BIO 101, 102; BIO 111, 112; 
BOT 203; CHE 121, 122; CHE 
128, 129; CHE 201, 202; CHE 
211; PHY 211, 212, 213; PHY 
217, 218,' 219; PHS 121, 122; 

ZOO 204, 208, 209 .5-K 

AreaV ( 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 S 

2. Three activity courses c 

NOTE: Certain preceding courses may be ex 
empted by examination with credit awarded 
Also, if a physical science sequence is used tc 
satisfy Area II, then a biological science mus 
be chosen in Area IV. The converse is also true 

Other Requirements 9t 

1. A minimum of 35 hours at the 
300 level. 

2. A maximum of 40 hours in any 
one discipline excluding 
courses taken under section A. 

General Studies 3C 

Courses at the 200 or above level 

1. Humanities 5-1C 

American civilization, art, com- 
parative literature, English or 
American literature, history, mu- 
sic, philosophy. 



BIOLOGY 



79 



2. Social Sciences 5-10 

Anthropology, criminal justice, 
economics, geography, mu- 
seum and preservation studies, 
political science, psychology, 
sociology. 

3. Mathematics and Natural 

Sciences 5-10 

Astronomy, biology, botany, 
chemistry, entomology, geol- 
ogy, mathematics, meteorol- 
ogy, oceanography, physics, 
zoology. 

4. Communication Arts 5-10 

Computer science, drama/ 
speech, film, foreign languages, 
journalism, linguistics. 

Area of Concentration (Any University 

System approved minor) 20-29 

Electives 36-45 

*Credit for special experience 
may be granted, at the discre- 
tion of the appropriate depart- 
ment; such credit, however, 
shall not exceed one-fourth of 
the total hours for the degree, 
and credit for courses not spe- 
cifically listed in the College cat- 
alog under "Advanced 
Placement and Credit by Ex- 
amination" shall not exceed ten 
hours. 

5. Regents' and Exit 
Examinations 



TOTAL 



191 



Biology 



: aculty 

/acant, Department Head 
teumer, Ronald 
3rower, Moonyean 
juillou, Laurent 
D ingel, Allen 
fhorne, Francis 
3raduate Faculty 



The major in biology consists of BIO 101 or 
111, BIO 102 or 112, BOT 203 and ZOO 204, 
and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology 
courses (Botany, Zoology, etc.) numbered 300 
or above. The majority of the courses in the ma- 
jor numbered 300 or above must be taken in the 



Biology Department at Armstrong State College. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology 
must include in his program the following 
courses: BIO 370; BIO 480; BOT 410 or ZOO 
410; one course in botany numbered 300 or 
above, other than BOT 410; and one course in 
zoology numbered 300 or above, other than 
ZOO 410. If credit for any of the first three re- 
quired units is transferred to Armstrong from an- 
other college, the department may require that 
it be validated by examination. 

In addition, biology majors must complete el- 
ementary statistics and the course sequence in 
organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The 
course in general college physics (15 quarter 
hours) is strongly recommended and should be 
considered essential for those who expect to 
continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. 
degree. 

To be eligible for a B.S. degree in biology the 
student must have a grade of at least "C" for all 
biology courses. 

Beginning students who have successfully 
completed strong courses in biology in high 
school may take examinations for advanced 
placement or for credit for BIO 101 and/or 102. 
Arrangements to take these examinations may 
be made with the head of the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits for 
the biology laboratory science sequence by tak- 
ing biology in the Savannah State-Armstrong ex- 
change program, a student must take the 
ENTIRE sequence of ten quarter hours either at 
Armstrong State College or at Savannah State 
College. 

By careful use of electives a student majoring 
in biology may concurrently acquire a second 
major in chemistry (i.e., he may take a "double 
major"). This program is recommended for pre- 
professional students. It does require 10 to 20 
quarter hours credit above the minimum re- 
quired for graduation. Ask the department head 
for additional information. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN BIOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area I .20 

1. ENG 101. 102 or 192. 201 or 

292 15 



80 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. BIO 101 or 111; 102 or 112 10 

2. MAT 101 (or 103 or 206 if ex- 
amination allows) and MAT 

220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; PSY 101, SOC 

201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; BOT 203 and 
ZOO 204 20 

2. Two courses from: natural sci- 
ences, Mathematics, foreign 
language 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement: 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1 . BIO 370, 480; BOT 41 or ZOO 
410 15 

2. Electives at the 300-400 level 
selected from biology, botany, 
entomology, and zoology. Elec- 
tives must include one BOT 
course other than BOT 410 and 
one ZOO course other than 
ZOO 410 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 

346 15 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
SPECIAL NOTES: 

(1 ) Biology majors should take BIO 101 or 1 1 1 , 
and BIO 102 or 112 during the freshman 
year, and BOT 203 and ZOO 204 during 
the sophomore year. CHE 128 and 129 
should be completed by the end of spring 
quarter of the sophomore year. 

(2) The biology major should complete organic 
chemistry (CHE 341 , 342, 343) no later than 
the end of the junior year as it is prerequisite 
or corequisite to all physiology courses. 



(3) Students who may wish to enter graduate 
school are advised that PHY 21 1 , 212, 213 
and foreign language to third quarter pro- 
ficiency should be considered essential. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN BIOLOGY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Areal 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200, 201 I 

Areall 2C 

1. MAT 101, 220 1G 

2. BIO 101 or 111; 102 or 112 1C 

Area III 2C 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191,1 15 or 192; POS 
113 i 

2. PSY 101 S 

ArealV 3C 

1. CHE 128, 129; ZOO 204; MAT 
103 2C 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 200, 201; SOC 201 

3 One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 
AreaV ( 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 

2. Three activity courses ; 

State Requirement: 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Courses in the Major Field 4i 

1 . BIO 370, 480; BOT 203 § 

2. BOT 410 or ZOO 410 

3. Electives at the 300-400 level 
selected from botany and 
zoology 21 

C. Courses in Related Fields 3( 

1 . CHE 341 , 342, 343, 344, 345, 

346 1 

2. Three of AST 301, MET 301, 
GEO 301, OCE 301, or PHY 211, 
212, 213 M\ 

D. Professional Sequence 4(; 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 
447, 481, 482, 483 3! 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 I 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 21i 



BIOLOGY 



81 



INOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The following minor concentrations are avail- 
Die from the Department of Biology. For minors, 
:e student must earn a grade of "C" or better 

each course offered for the minor. 
ie minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 

Biology 25 

1. BIO 101 or 111, 102 or 112 10 

2. BIO electives of which at least 
10 hours must be at 300-400 

level 15 

Botany 25 

1. BIO 101 or 11 1 , 102or112;BOT 
203 15 

2. Two courses from: BOT 305, 
323, 410, 425 10 

Zoology 25 

1. BIO 101 or 111, 102 or 112; 
ZOO 204 15 

2. Two courses selected from: ENT 
301; ZOO 325, 355, 356, 372, 
410, 429, 435 10 

Human Biology 25 

1. ZOO 208 and 209 10 

2. BIO/ZOO electives of which at 
least 10 hours must be at or 
above the 300-level. Choose 
from: BIO 210 or 351, BIO 310, 
353, 380. ZOO 215, or 330 15 



're-Professional Programs 

Students majoring in biology may concur- 
ently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, and/ 
>r pre-veterinary requirements and all require- 
ments for secondary teaching certification in sci- 
;nce (biology). 

Other pre-professional programs include: 

Internships. The Department offers a number 
)f internship options in the areas of research, 
ipplied biology, and environmental education, 
t also offers programs in which students can 
vork with physicians, veterinarians, and den- 
ists. 

Pre-forestry program with the University of 
3eorgia. A student may complete two years of 
a pre-forestry curriculum at Armstrong, then 
ransfer to the University of Georgia. After two 
additional years of coursework, the student may 
eceive a B.S. in Forest Resources. 



Pre-forestry/Environmental Management 
Affiliation with Duke University. In this pro 
gram, a student may complete three years of 
study at Armstrong and then may apply for ad- 
mission to the Duke program. If accepted, the 
student may complete two additional years at 
Duke. Upon successfully completing the first 
year at Duke, the student will receive a B.S. in 
Biology from Armstrong; after successful com- 
pletion of the second year, the student will re- 
ceive a Master of Science degree in either 
forestry or environmental management from 
Duke University. 



Scholarships in Biology 

The department offers a limited number of 
scholarships to Biology majors. Interested stu- 
dents are invited to inquire in the department 
office for details. 



Biology Honors 

Students who perform independent biological 
research and submit acceptable oral and written 
reports to a departmental committee may be 
eligible to have "graduated with departmental 
honors" noted on their official academic rec- 
ords. 

To qualify for this honor, students must have 
at the time of application: 1 20-1 50 quarter hours 
of course work; a minimum college GPA of 3.3; 
a minimum biology GPA of 3.5 with no grade 
lower than "C"; and three or more 300-400 level 
course completed. 

The committee will consist of three biology 
faculty, adding where applicable a biologist 
from outside the college. The committee will ex- 
amine students' proposals before projects are 
undertaken and evaluate the projects at their 
completion. 



Offerings 

Biology Offerings 

BIO 101— Principles of Biology I (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: none 
Structure and function of cells, biological 

chemistry; structure, function, and development 

of flowering plants. 



82 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BIO 102— Principles of Biology II (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Biology 
101. 

Structure, function, and development of ver- 
tebrate animals; genetics; ecology; evolution. 

BIO 111— Advanced Introductory Biology I 
(4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG 101 and 
MAT 101. 

Structure, function and development of 
plants, cells, tissues, organs, reproduction, ge- 
netics, phylogeny and ecology. This course, 
while similar in format to Biology 101, is pre- 
sented at a level involving greater topical detail 
and more student interaction than in the tradi- 
tional course. Some field work is required. 

BIO 112 — Advanced Introductory Biology II 
(4-3-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 111. 

Structure, function and development of ani- 
mals: cells, tissues, organs, reproduction, ge- 
netics, ecological systems and organic 
evolution. This course is a continuation of BIO 
101 or BIO 111 and will involve independent 
student activities in the lab. Some field work is 
required. 

BIO/PHY 205— Radiation Biology (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 213 or 218 or 202, and a 
two-quarter sequence in anatomy and physiol- 
ogy or general biology. 

Sources, propagation, and interactions of ion- 
izing radiation and its biological effect. (Credit 
may not be applied toward a major in biology 
or in chemistry). 

BIO 210— Microorganisms and Disease (4-3- 
5) 

Fall and Winter. Prerequisites: CHE 201 or 1 22 
and ZOO 209. 

An introduction to the study of microorga- 
nisms with primary emphasis on bacteria. The 
morphology, life history, and importance to pub- 
lic health of representative bacteria, fungi, vi- 
ruses, and protozoa are considered. Credit for 
this course may not be applied toward a major 
in biology. 

BIO 310 — Man and the Environment 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter 
hours credit in college courses. 

Consideration of the interactions between hu- 
mans and the support systems of the earth 
which are essential to their existence. Credit for 



this course may not be applied toward a major] 
in biology. 

BIO 351— Bacteriology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: 10 hours of biological sci 
ence, CHE 128-129. 

A study of the morphology, ecology, classifi 
cation, and genetics of the bacteria and relatedl 
micro-organisms, including the viruses. 

BIO 352— Medical Microbiology (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: BIO 351 and permission 
of the instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the disease-caus- 
ing microbes in terms of their diagnosis, pa-| 
thology, and epidemiology. 

BIO 353 — Immunology and Serology 
(3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 128 and 129 oi 
permission of instructor and department head. 

A fundamental study of humoral and cellulai 
immunity, the structure and biosynthesis of an- 
tibodies, and the interactions between antigens 
and antibodies. Consideration will be given tc 
allergic states and other immunological dis 
eases. 

BIO 358— Histological Technique (0-10-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BI0 1 01 or 1 1 1 , and BIC 
102 or 112. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing 
embedding, sectioning, staining, and mountinc 
plant and animal materials for study. 

BIO 360— Cell Structure and Function (5-0- 
5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 102 or 112, CHf 
128, 129 

An introduction to cell biology including th( 
study of cell ultrastructure, the major physiolog 
ical processes, cell reproduction and cell dif 
ferentiation. 

BIO 370— Genetics (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 1 01 or 1 11 , BIO 1 0; 
or 112, CHE 128, 129; BIO 351 and junior statu: 
recommended. 

An introduction to the principles of biologies 
inheritance. 

BIO 380— Human Genetics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208-20! 
and CHE 1 28-1 29 or CHE 201 -202, or CHE 1 21 
122. 

An introduction to human inheritance includ; 
ing gene transmission, gene effects upon me 
tabolism, population and quantitative genetics 



BIOLOGY 



83 



enetics of sex-determination, pedigree analy- 
is, eugenics, and genetic screening and coun- 
eling. 

HO 410— Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 
lird quarter junior status; two courses in biology 
umbered 300 or above; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships 
jetween microscopic anatomy and cell chem- 
stry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, 
ind growth. 

310 440— Cytology (2-6-5) 

Winter Prerequisite: Two courses in biology 
lumbered 300 or above. 
' The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, 
jrowth, differentiation, and reproduction. 

HO 450— Evolution (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Major in biology (at least 
5 qtr. hrs. credit in biology courses numbered 
100 or above). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

310 470-471-472— Seminar (1-0-1) 

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior Biol- 
)gy majors. 

Library research, class presentations, and 
discussions in selected areas of Biology. 

3IO 480— General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Three courses in biol- 
ogy numbered 300 or above. 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their 
application to the welfare of humans, coordi- 
nated with a study of populations and commu- 
nities in the field. 

BIO 490— Research (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 
hours credit in biology courses numbered 300 
or above; a B average in biology courses and 
in overall work; consent of department head; 
agreement of a staff member to supervise work. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed 
by a member of the department. Supervised re- 
search including literature search, field and/or 
laboratory investigation and presentation of an 
acceptable written report of results. Credit will 
depend upon the work to be done. Both credit 
and proposed work must be approved in ad- 
vance, in writing, by the faculty member to su- 
pervise the work and by the department head. 

BIO 495, 496— Internship (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: Junior 
standing and permission of the Department 
Head. 



The student will be engaged in a biological 
project sponsored by an outside agency. The 
project will be selected, supervised, evaluated, 
and credit hours determined by the student's 
faculty advisor in consultation with the outside 
agency. The student must make application dur- 
ing the quarter preceding the internship. No 
more than 5 (five) hours may be counted toward 
the major. 



Botany Offerings 

BOT 201— Principles of Horticulture 
(4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Introduction to basic gardening principles 
with emphasis on plant growth and development 
as responses to varying environmental condi- 
tions. Topics to be covered include plant clas- 
sification, growth and development, 
environment, propagation, disease and pest 
control. This course may be applied as elective 
credit towards the B.S. degree in biology. 

BOT 203— Survey of the Plant Kingdom 
(3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or 1 1 1 and 102 
or 112. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the divisions of 
the plant kingdom, with emphasis upon the ev- 
olution of the land flora. 

BOT 305 — Identification of Flowering Plants 
(0-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of bi- 
ology. 

Studies in the identification of plants with em- 
phasis on local flora. 

BOT 323— Plant Anatomy (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

The origin and development of the organs and 
tissue systems of vascular plants, and a com- 
parative study of the structure of roots, stems, 
leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

BOT 410— Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: 15 quarter hours of bi- 
ology. 

A survey of physiologic processes occuring 
in plants and the conditions which affect these 
processes. 

BOT 425— Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: BOT 323. 
Comparative studies of vascular plants with 



84 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



emphasis on form, structure, reproduction, and 
evolutionary relationships. 

Entomology Offerings 

ENT 301— Introductory Entomology 
(3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 111 and 102 
or 112. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their 
structure, identification, and biology. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 204 — Survey of the Animal Kingdom 
(3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. 
An evolutionary survey of the major animal 
phyla. 

ZOO 208— Human Anatomy and Physiology 

I (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

A basic course considering the gross anat- 
omy, histology, and physiology of the human 
organ systems. Intended primarily for majors in 
health sciences, credit for this course may not 
be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 209— Human Anatomy and Physiology 

II (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisites: ZOO 208 
and CHE 201 or 122. 

A continuation of the basic course consider- 
ing the anatomy and physiology of the human. 
Credit may not be applied toward a major in 
biology. 

ZOO 211— Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and 
Physiology (2-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 209. 

The cardiopulmonary system is studied with 
special emphasis on functional anatomy. The 
physiology of the heart, the control of circulation, 
respiration, and blood pressure, and particle 
movement across membranes are also studied. 
Intended primarily for majors in health sciences; 
credit for this course may not be applied toward 
a major in biology. 

ZOO 215 — Human Physiology and Disease 
(4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: ZOO 208 and 209 or 
other acceptable courses in human, general, or 
vertebrate physiology. 

An introductory consideration of disease as 
disruption of physiological homeostasis. Initial 



emphasis is placed on normal function, control! 
and environment of cells as a basis for undenl 
standing cellular and systemic responses tc 
agents of injury and organismic effects of those 
responses. Intended primarily for majors if 
health sciences. 

ZOO 325— Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, in- 
terrelations, and natural history of the major in- 
vertebrate groups. 

ZOO 330— Fundamentals of Nutrition 
(5-0-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: BIC 
101/ 

111-1 02/1 1 2 or ZOO 208-209, and CHE 1 21 -1 22 
or CHE 201. 

Biological bases of animal, including human : 
nutrition; sources and biological utilization anc 
functions of nutrients. 

ZOO 355— Embryology (4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 1 01 or 1 1 1 , 1 02 or 1 1 2 
and ZOO 204. 

An elementary course in embryology in which 
the chick is used to illustrate the basic principles 
of developmental anatomy. 

ZOO 356 — Comparative Anatomy of the 
Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 111, 102 o 
112, and ZOO 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the 
organ systems of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 357— Animal Histology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 111, 102 oi 
112, and ZOO 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organizatior 
into organs and organ systems in animals. 

ZOO 372— Parasitology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
A comparative study of the internal and ex- 
ternal parasites of man and other animals. 

ZOO 410— General Vertebrate Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: Junior status, including 15 
hours of biology; Organic Chemistry (may be 
taken concurrently). 

An introduction to the general physiologic 
processes of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 425— Marine Invertebrate Zoology 
(2-6-5) 

Spring. Even numbered years. Prerequisites: 
ZOO 325 or ZOO 204 with a grade of A or B. 



GRADUATE BIOLOGY 



85 



Studies in the identification and ecologic dis- 
ibution of marine invertebrates as exemplified 
iy collection from the southeastern coastal re- 

non. 

:00 429 — Endocrinology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: ZOO 410 
t other acceptable physiology course. 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their con- 
'ol of metabolism and reproductive cycles. 

!00 435 — Comparative Physiology 
3-4-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: Junior 
;tatus, including 15 hours of biology; Organic 
Chemistry (may be taken concurrently). 

Studies in various groups of animals of the 
unctions of organ systems involved in the main- 
enance of homeostasis under varying condi- 
ions within normal habitats and of in vitro 
eactions of tissues and systems under labo- 
atory conditions. 



Graduate Courses 



Marine Science Center Offerings 

The following courses, offered at the Skida- 
vay Island Marine Science Center, are coop- 
eratively sponsored by ASC, GIT, GSC, GSU, 
jnd UGA. Five quarter hours of credit from these 
:ourses may be applied within the major in bi- 
Dlogy or as electives toward the B.S. in Biology 
degree. 
BIO 430— Estuarine Ecology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: CHE 1 28, 
129; ZOO 204; two courses in biology numbered 
300 or above; or permission of instructor. MAT 
206 recommended. 

The evolution and development of estuaries, 
substrates, physical processes, communities, 
ecosystem functions, ecosystem dynamics and 
analysis. The study area will include the estuar- 
ine complex of the Carolinian province as ex- 
emplified along the coast of Georgia. 

ZOO 405— Ichthyology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: ZOO 204 
and one course in zoology numbered 300 or 
above, or permission of instructor. 

The taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and ev- 
olution of fishes with special reference to the 
fishes of eastern North America. 



The biology MEd program has been deacti- 
vated, but the department offers a limited num- 
ber of graduate courses. Students should check 
with the biology department for complete infor- 
mation on the course offerings. 



Biology Offerings 

BIO 610— Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Complete sequence in Organic 
Chemistry and five hours of physiology. 
(See BIO 410 for course description.) 

BIO 640— Cytology (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Two senior division courses in 
biology. 
(See BIO 420 for course description.) 

BIO 650— Evolution (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: At least 15 quarter hours credit 
in upper division biology (botany or zoology) 
courses. 

(See BIO 450 for course description.) 

BIO 680 — General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Three upper division courses in 
biology (botany or zoology). 
(See BIO 480 for course description.) 



Botany Offerings 

BOT 610— Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: BOT 203 and Organic Chem- 
istry. 
(See BOT 410 for course description.) 

BOT 625— Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: BOT 203. 

(See BOT 425 for course description.) 

BOT 701— Plant Diversity I: Non-Vascular 
Plants (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours credit 
in botany. 

Morphology, taxonomy, and ecology of the 
algae, fungi, mosses, and liverworts, including 
identification of common species, field and lab- 
oratory methods, local habitats and sources. 

BOT 702— Plant Diversity II: Vascular Plants 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours credit 
in botany 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Morphology, taxonomy, and ecology of the 
primitive vascular plants, ferns, gymnosperms, 
and angiosperms, including field and laboratory 
methods, local habitats and sources. 

BOT/EDN 793 — Botany for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

This course is not suitable for the general sci- 
ence major. 

Lecture-laboratory course dealing with prin- 
ciples involved in classifying and identifying 
plant life. 



Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 525— Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

(See ZOO 325 for course description.) 

ZOO 556— Comparative Anatomy of the 
Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

(See ZOO 356 for course description.) 

ZOO 610— General Vertebrate Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic Chem- 
istry. 
(See ZOO 410 for course description.) 

ZOO 625 — Marine Invertebrate Zoology 
(2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 325 or permission of in- 
structor and department head. 
(See ZOO 425 for course description.) 

ZOO 629— Endocrinology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 410 and one other senior 
division course in biology. 
(See ZOO 429 for course description.) 

ZOO 635— Comparative Physiology (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 204 and Organic Chem- 
istry 
(See ZOO 435 for course description.) 

ZOO 710— Applied Human Physiology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: graduate standing plus a 
course in human, general, or vertebrate physi- 
ology, and organic or biological chemistry. 

A consideration of human physiological re- 
sponses to normal and abnormal stressors of 
the external and internal environment, including 
local and systemic adaptations to stressors. 
Specific malfunctions and adjustments will be 
treated where feasible and appropriate. 



Laboratory sessions will feature the empirica 
demonstratiorrof physiologic concepts and their 
applications to human function, largely through) 
controlled experimentation. 

ZOO 715— Pathophysiology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: At least one course in humar 
or vertebrate physiology and at least one course 
in organic or biological chemistry. 

A conceptual, integrative consideration of 
disease processes. Emphasis is placed or 
disease as a maladaptive response or failure of 
adaptation to physiological stressors 
Laboratory experiences will illustrate both 
adaptive and maladaptive responses tc 
homeostatic disruption. 

ZOO 721— Animal Diversity I: Invertebrates 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours credi 
in zoology. 

Structure, function, and ecologic relationships 
of the major invertebrate phyla. (Not open tc 
students with credits in invertebrate zoology.) 

ZOO 722— Animal Diversity II: Vertebrates 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 15 quarter hours cred 
in zoology. 

Structure, function, and ecologic relationship 
of the vertebrates, with emphasis on amphibiou 
and terrestrial forms. 

ZOO 731— Ecological Associations (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: at least 25 quarter hours cred 
in junior-senior level courses in biology. 

Environmental relationships among and be 
tween groups of organisms and their enviror 
ments. 

ZOO/EDN 792— Zoology for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

This course is not suitable for general scieno 
majors. 

Modern approaches to teaching the biolog 
cal sciences. Emphasis on understanding of li 
processes in the animal kingdom. 



Courses at Marine Science Center 

The following courses are offered at the Ma 
rine Science Center on Skidaway Island and an 
open to both graduate and undergraduate stu 
dents. These courses are cooperatively spon 
sored by Armstrong State College, Georgi. 
Institute of Technology, Georgia State Univer 
sity, Georgia Southern College, and the Univerl 
sity of Georgia. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



87 



10 630— Estuarine Ecology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: CHE 1 28, 
?9; ZOO 204; two courses in biology numbered 
)0 or above; or permission of instructor. MAT 
)6 recommended. 

(See BIO 430 for course description.) 

)0 605— Ichthyology (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: ZOO 204 
id one course in zoology numbered 300 or 
ove, or permission of instructor. 
(See ZOO 405 for course description.) 



Chemistry and Physics 

acuity 

arris, Henry, Department Head 

aker, Julia 

rewer, John 

utler, Frank 

arpenter, Suzanne 

aynes, Leon 

Dhnson, Robert 

Dnes, Gerald 

tratton, Cedric 

'hiten, Morris 

raduate Faculty 

The department offers the Bachelor of Sei- 
se with a major in chemistry, designed to give 
epth in the fields of chemistry, yet flexible 
nough to accommodate a range of career 
oals Students majoring in chemistry may con- 
urrently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, 
r pre-vetermary requirements and all require- 
ients for secondary teaching certification in sci- 
nce (chemistry). 

By careful use of electives a student majoring 
i chemistry may concurrently acquire a second 
lajor in biology (i.e. the student may take a 
double major"). This program is recommended 
)r pre-professional students. It does require 10 
:> 20 quarter hours credit above the minimum 
squired for graduation. 

The department participates in the Dual De- 
iree Programs of Armstrong State College un- 
ler which students may earn simultaneously the 
i.S degree with a major in chemistry or physical 
ciences from Armstrong and the Bachelor's de- 
iree from the Georgia Institute of Technology or 
>ne of several other engineering schools in a 
elated field, such as chemical engineering. Stu- 
ients interested in learning more about the de- 
ree programs or any course offered by the 
epartment should contact the department 
lead. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN CHEMISTRY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

One course selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS 200; PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

PHY 211, 212or217*, 218* 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

POS 113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 

201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; 
SOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

CHE 128, 129, 211 15 

MAT 206 5 

PHY 213 or 219* 5 

Computer Science or Mathe- 
matics or Natural Science 5 

AreaV 6 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 

346, 380, 491 25 

Approved electives chosen 
from: CHE 307, 308, 350, 421, 
441, 461, 462, 466, 481, 482, 

483, 492, 493, 496 20 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

CS 115, 142, or 246 5 

Additional courses in Computer 
Science, Mathematics, or Nat- 
ural Sciences 10 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
'Recommended sequence. 



88 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN CHEMISTRY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I : 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; 
ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 

200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

POS 113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 

201 , ECO 201 , 202; SOC 201 .. 5 
ArealV 30 

CHE211 5 

PHY 211, 212, or 217, 218 10 

PSY101 5 

EDN200 5 

One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

DRS228 5 

AreaV 6 

PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 

380,491 25 

CHE 492, 493 or CHE 481 , 482, 

483,496 10 

CHE 461 5 

Approved 300-400 level Chem- 
istry elective 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

MAT 206 5 

BIO 101, 102 10 

PHY 213 or 219 5 

One course selected from: AST 
301; GEL 301; MET 301; OCE 

301, 430; PHY 312 5 

D. Professional sequence 35 

EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 481, 

482, 483 30 

PSY301 or EDN 302 5 

E. Regents' Examination and Exit 
Examinations 

TOTAL 206 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Areal 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

One course selected from: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273; 

ENG 222; MUS 200; PHI 

200, 201 £ 

Areall 2C 

MAT 101, 103 1C 

CHE 128, 129 1C 

Area III 2C 

HIS114or191,115or192;POS 

113 f 

One course selected from: 
ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 
101; SOC 201 

ArealV 3( 

PHY 211, 212, 213 or PHY 217, 

218, 219 11 

MAT 206, 207, 208 " 1! 

AreaV V 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 

Three activity courses :j 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Major Field Requirements 4* 

PHY 312 "..' 

Ten hours chosen from: 

AST, GEL, MET, OCE 1 

Thirty hours selected from the 
following with a maximum of 15 
hours from any one area: 
CHE 21 1 , 300-400 CHE courses 
EGR 220, 221, 300-400 EGR 
courses 300-400 PHY courses 

C. Related Field Requirements 2 

CS246 

CSor MAT i 

D. Electives 1 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 

TOTAL 20 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



89 



linor Concentrations 

The minor in Chemistry requires twenty credit 
Durs with grades of "C" or better in upper eli- 
sion chemistry courses. 
The minor in Engineering Studies requires En- 
neering 101, 102, 103, 220, and 221, plus 10 
Durs chosen from upper division engineering 
ectives for a total of 29 quarter credit hours, 
grade of at least "C" in each course is re- 
jired. 

The minor in Physics requires twenty-three 
edit hours from courses designated as phys- 
s numbered 21 1 or higher. A grade of "C" or 
stter in each course is required. 
The minor in Physical Science requires ten 
edit hours of a laboratory sequence in chem- 
try, physical science, or physics plus fifteen 
xjrs chosen from: AST 301, CHE 301, GEL 
)1 , MET 301 , OCE 301 . A grade of "C" or better 
required in each course. 



ie Engineering 
tudies Program 

A selection of basic engineering courses is 
fered at Armstrong State College to facilitate 
e transfer of students into engineering pro- 
'ams. By choosing appropriate courses at 
rmstrong, a student may be able to complete 
baccalaureate engineering program in fewer 
an two academic years of residence at an en- 
neering school. 

All core curriculum and basic engineering 
Durses may be taken at ASC. This program of 
xirses has been constructed and designed 
ith full cooperation and counsel from The Geor- 
a Institute of Technology. 



)fferings 

hemistry Offerings 

HE 121-122— Introduction to Chemistry 
-3-5) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 101. (Credit 

these courses may not be applied to a major 

chemistry.) 

These courses include a study of the funda- 
iental laws and theories of inorganic chemistry, 
I survey of organic chemistry, and an mtroduc- 
:>n to biochemistry. 



CHE 128-129— General Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra or concurrently. 
Offered each quarter. 

These courses are the first two of the series 
128, 129,211 required to complete an academic 
year of general chemistry. A study of the fun- 
damental principles and laws of chemistry with 
a quantitative approach to the subject. These 
courses are designed for the science, pre-med- 
ical and engineering student. The laboratory 
work includes an understanding of fundamental 
techniques. 

CHE 201 — Essentials of General Chemistry 
(5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and bio- 
chemistry with emphasis on applications in hu- 
man physiology and clinical chemistry. 
Experimental principles will be illustrated with 
classroom demonstrations. 

CHE 202— Physical Principles (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 201. 

This course provides a study of the physical 
principles of gas behavior, acid-base calcula- 
tions, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pH 
measurements, blood gas measurements, and 
other subjects of special interest to persons in 
allied health sciences. 

CHE 211— Chemical Principles (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. Fall and Spring. 

This course is the third in the sequence 128, 
1 29, 21 1 required to complete an academic year 
of general chemistry. Stresses chemical ther- 
modynamics, kinetics, and equilibria. 

CHE 301— The Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory 
science completed. Offered on demand. 

An introductory course covering selected 
areas of applied biochemistry. This course is not 
recommended for chemistry, biology, or 
premedical students. 

CHE 307— Principles of Chemical 
Processes (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: CHE 129 and MAT 206. 

Methods of material balance in chemical 
process are studied. Topic subjects include 
processes and process variables, systems of 
units, gas behavior, single-phase and multi- 
phase systems. TEXT: Level of Felder and Rous- 
seau Elementary Principles of Chemical Proc- 
esses. 



90 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 308— Principles of Chemical 
Processes II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 307. 

Methods of energy balance in chemical proc- 
esses are studied. Various forms of energy 
changes involved in both reactive and non-re- 
active processes are introduced. Emphasis is 
placed on the application of combined material 
and energy balances in processes. TEXT: Level 
of Felder and Rousseau Elementary Principles 
of Chemical Processes. 

CHE 341-342— Organic Chemistry (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Fall, Winter. 

These courses include the study of aliphatics, 
aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives, 
polyfunctional compounds, and polynuclear hy- 
drocarbons. Organic reactions are emphasized 
in terms of modern theory. 

CHE 343— Organic Chemistry (4-0-4) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry se- 
quence 341, 342. This course completes the 
fundamental study of organic chemistry with a 
consideration of carbohydrates, amino acids, 
and heterocyclics with their related compounds. 

CHE 344, 345, 346— Organic Chemistry 
Laboratory I, II, III (0-3-1) 

Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHE 341, 342, 
343 respectively. 

Studies of techniques and reactions used in 
organic chemistry. 

CHE 350— Chemical Literature (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Offered on de- 
mand. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and 
the important journals references, and infor- 
mation sources. 

CHE 380— Quantitative Instrumental 
Analysis (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. Winter and Summer. 

A study of the principles of volumetric, spec- 
trophotometer, electrometric and chromato- 
graphic methods of analysis. 

CHE 397— Scientific Glass-Blowing 
(0-4-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Of- 
fered on demand. 

Properties of glass for scientific apparatus; 
introduction of glass working equipment; plan- 
ning of sequential joining operations; demon- 
stration of major techniques for joining and 
working glass; supervision of individual students 
in preparing testpieces. 



CHE 410— Chemical Safety (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite': CHE 341. Offered on demand. 

Topic subjects will include standard labora 
tory safety practices, hazardous properties o 
chemicals, safety practices in the storage, us< 
and disposal of chemicals, and government reg 
ulations. 

CHE 421 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
(3-3-4) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. Offered on demand. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tend 
ing to increase students' understanding c 
mechanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasize: 
the periodicity of elements. 

CHE 431-432— Seminar (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand 
Selected topics for group discussion. 

CHE 441— Advanced Organic Chemistry 
(3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Spring. 

A further study of important organic reaction 
emphasizing theories of reaction mechanism c 
organic chemistry. 

CHE 448— Organic Qualitative Analysis 
(2-9-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand 

Systematic approach to the identification ( 

organic compounds. 

CHE 451— History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Spring, odd years. Prerequisites: Junic 
standing and CHE 129. 

The development of science surveyed froi 
antiquity to the present. Emphasis is placed c 
the development of ideas, men who made si< 
nificant contributions, evolution of chemical \h\\ 
ories, and the modern social implications 
science. 

CHE 461— Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demands 
A study of the chemical nature of cellular con 
stituents and cellular metabolism. Subject topic 
include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, ei 
zymes, vitamins and coenzymes, anaerobic ca; 
bohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, tr 
tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphor^ 
ation, and photosynthesis. 

CHE 462— Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 461 . Offered on demand 
A study of the metabolism of ammonia ar^ 
nitrogen-containing compounds, the biosy 
thesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabo 
regulation, and selected topics. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



91 



HE 463— Clinical Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 
A study of the principles of chemistry applied 
the ciinical laboratory. Topic subjects to in- 
jde instrumentation and microtechniques. 

HE 466 — Biochemistry Laboratory 
•6-2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 461 . Offered 
demand. 

A study of techniques used in biochemistry 
search. Topic subjects include separation, 
rification and characterization procedures. 

HE 481— Advanced Instrumental Analysis 
3-2) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. 
A study of electrometric methods of analysis, 
pic subjects will include potentiometric, cou- 
netric, and polarographic measurements. 

HE 482 — Advanced Instrumental Analysis 
•3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 380 and PHY 312. 
A study of spectrophotometric and chromat- 
iraphic methods of analysis. Topic subjects 
II include visible and ultra-violet spectroscopy, 
is-iiquid chromatography, high performance 
uid chromatography, atomic emission and 
•sorption spectroscopy. 

HE 483 — Advanced Instrumental Analysis 
■3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 342 and 482. 
A continuation of the study of spectroscopy, 
•pic subjects will include infrared spectros- 
'py, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron- 
'in resonance and mass spectrometry. 

HE 491-492-493— Physical Chemistry 
•3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 380, PHY 213, MAT 206. 
ill, Winter, Spring. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry 
:luding the study of solids, liquids, gases, 
ermochemistry, thermodynamics and solu- 
■ns These courses will also cover a study of 
lemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, electro- 
lemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics and 
iclear chemistry. 

HE 496— Internship (V-V(1-12)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequi- 
es: CHE 343, 380, 491 and permission of the 
lemistry Intern Program Director. 
The student will pursue a meaningful project 
industry, government or other institutional set- 
ig. The project will be determined, supervised, 
id evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and 



the student's faculty adviser. Application and / 
arrangement must be made through the de- 
partment by mid-quarter preceding the quarter 
of internship. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of the Faculty at 
Armstrong and the appropriate official of the 
school from which the student comes. 

CHE 497-498-499— Independent Study 
(V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Head of the De- 
partment. Offered each quarter. 

Designed to permit qualified students to pur- 
sue supervised individual research or study. 
Emphasis will be placed on the literature search, 
laboratory experimentation, and presentation of 
an acceptable written report. Both the credit and 
proposed work must be approved in writing by 
the faculty member who will supervise the work 
and by the department head. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean 
of the Faculty at Armstrong and of the college 
from which the student comes. 



Engineering Offerings 

EGR 100 — Introduction to Engineering 
(3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Eligibility to enter MAT 101 and 
ENG 101. 

A comprehensive orientation to the engineer- 
ing process from problem formulation to the ev- 
olution of creative design; fundamental 
concepts from various fields of engineering. 

EGR 170 — Engineering Graphics (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103. 

Communication using orthographic projec- 
tion, reading and writing the graphic language 
both with instruments and through free-hand 
sketching, pictorials, auxiliaries, dimensioning, 
geometric construction and lettering. 

EGR 171— Engineering Graphics II (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: EGR 170 

Space visualization of points, lines, and 
planes; graphical analysis of engineering prob- 
lems; fundamentals of computer-aided design; 
working drawings related to specialized engi- 
neering fields. 



92 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EGR 220— Statics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 207. 

Concepts of forces, moments, and other vec- 
tor quantities; analysis of two-and-three-dimen- 
sional force systems; conditions of equilibrium; 
friction; centroids and moments of inertia. 

EGR 221— Dynamics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 220 and MAT 208. 

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; ki- 
netics of particles and rigid bodies using force- 
mass-acceleration, work-energy, and momen- 
tum methods in two-and-three-dimensional mo- 
tion. 

EGR 322— Mechanics of Deformable Bodies 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 220. 

Internal effects and dimension changes of sol- 
ids resulting from externally applied loads/ear 
and bending moment diagrams; analysis of 
stress and strain; beam deflection; column sta- 
bility. 

EGR 310— Electrical Circuit Analysis 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Core- 
quisite: MAT 341. 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, 
nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's and Nor- 
ton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled 
circuits, and two-port parameters. 

EGR 311— Electronics I (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: EGR 310. 

Introduction to P-N junction theory and the 
concepts of solid-state devices; development of 
the electrical characteristics of diodes and tran- 
sistors; bipolar and field-effect amplifying cir- 
cuits; operational amplifiers and analog 
systems. 

EGR 312— Electronics II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: EGR 311. 

Operation and application of integrated cir- 
cuits used in digital systems; gates, flip-flops, 
counters, registers and memory devices. 

EGR 323— Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221, EGR 330, and MAT 
341. 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the 
continuity, momentum, and energy conservation 
relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

EGR 330— Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208. 
Basic concepts of thermodynamics; proper- 
ties of substances; conservation principles; the 



first and second laws of thermodynamics; ei 
tropy; analysis of thermodynamic systems. 

EGR 331— Thermodynamics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 330. 

Gas cycles; vapor cycles; thermodynamic n 
lationships; thermodynamic behavior of re 
gases; non-reacting gas mixtures; thermod 
namics of chemical reactions. 

EGR 332— Heat Transfer (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 323. 

The fundamental principle of heat transfe 
steady and transient conduction in solids; intr 
duction to convective heat transfer; thermal r 
diation. 

EGR 350— Computer Applications in 
Engineering (2-3-3) 

Prerequisites: CS 246, EGR 221, EGR 31 
EGR 323. 

The application of digital computers to the s 
lution of selected engineering problems usir 
FORTRAN; emphasis On problem analysis ar 
solution techniques. 

EGR 370 — Engineering Economic Analysis 
(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 206 and ECO 202. - 
Fundamental principles and basic techniqui 
of economic analysis of engineering projects i 
eluding economic measure of effectivenes 
time value of money, cost estimation, breakevi 
and replacement analysis. 

EGR 396— Engineering Internship 
(V-V-(1-12)) 

Prerequisites: EGR 171, EGR 322, and p< 
mission of the Engineering Intern Program [ 
rector. 

The student will pursue a meaningful proje 
in industry or government. The project will I 
determined, supervised, and evaluated by t 
sponsor of the activity and the Engineering 
tern Program Director. Application and arranc 
ment must be made through the department 
mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internsh 



Physical Science Offerings 

PHS 121— Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: admission requirements. C 
fered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental la* 
and concepts of physics and astronomy. Tr 
course is designed for non-science majors 
terested in a descriptive survey. The laboratc 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



93 



jdy is designed to supplement the study of 
eory. 

HS 122 — Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: admission requirements. Of- 
red each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws 
id theories of chemistry and geology. This is 
descriptive course which includes the clas- 
ication of elements, basic chemical reactions, 
id atomic structure designed for the non-sci- 
ice major. The laboratory study includes ex- 
jriences which augment class discussion. 

ST 301 — Introduction to Astronomy 
-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory 
:ience completed. Winter. 
A study of the planetary system, stars, stellar 
ructure, and cosmology. 

EL 301— Introduction to Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory 
:ience completed. Fall. 

An introduction of physical and historical ge- 
ogy. A study of the origin, evolution, and struc- 
re of the earth's crust, and geologic history. 

ET 301 — Introduction to Meteorology 
-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Ten quarter hours of laboratory 
:ience completed. Spring. 
An introduction to the description of the state 
the atmosphere and to the physical laws that 
ascribe atmospheric phenomena. 

CE 301 — Introduction to Oceanography 
-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory 
:ience completed. Offered on demand. 
A study of the basic principles of oceanog- 
phy. Topic subjects to include the distribution 
water over the earth, nature and relief of the 
:ean floors, tides and currents, chemical prop- 
ties of sea water and constituents, and appo- 
rtions of oceanographic research. 



'lysics Offerings 

HY 211— Mechanics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103. Fall. 
I The first part of the sequence PHY 211-212- 
|13 in genera! physics. Basic classical physics. 
1 eluding mechanics, sound, and heat. De- 
igned for students with aptitude in mathematics 
telow the level of calculus. Selected experi- 
ments to demonstrate applications. 



PHY 212— Electricity, Magnetism, Basic 
Light (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and PHY 21 1 . 
Winter. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 211- 
212-213. Basic electricity, magnetism, and geo- 
metrical optics. 

PHY 213— Light Phenomena, Modern 
Physics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and PHY 212. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 211-212- 
213. Continues the study of light from the view- 
point of physical optics, and concludes with the 
study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory 
work includes two selected experiments of ad- 
vanced scope. 

PHY 217— Mechanics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: MAT 206. Fall and Spring. 

The first part of the sequence PHY 217-218- 
219 in general physics. Basic classical physics, 
including mechanics, sound and heat. De- 
signed especially for engineering students and 
recommended for science majors. Selected ex- 
periments to demonstrate applications. 

PHY 218— Electricity, Magnetism, Basic 
Light (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 or concurrently and 
PHY 217. 
Winter and Fall. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 217- 
218-219. Basic electricity, magnetism, and geo- 
metrical optics. 

PHY 219— Light Phenomena, Modern 
Physics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Spring and Winter. 

The last part of the sequence PHY 217-218- 
219. Continues the study of light from the view- 
point of physical optics, and concludes with the 
study of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory 
work includes two selected experiments of ad- 
vanced scope. 

PHY 310— Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Core- 
quisite: MAT 341. 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, 
nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's and Nor- 
ton's theorems: phasors, magnetically coupled 
circuits, and two-port parameters 



94 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PHY 312— Digital Electronics (3-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 103 and ten quarter hours 
of laboratory science completed. 

An introduction to discrete component and 
integrated circuits used in modern digital elec- 
tronics. The primary -objective of this course is 
to give students hands-on experience in con- 
structing and investigating an array of digital 
circuits that are directly applicable in instru- 
mentation. 

PHY 322 — Mechanics of Deformable Bodies 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 220. 

Internal effects and dimension changes of 
solids resulting from externally applied 
loads; shear and bending moment diagrams; 
analysis of stress and strain; beam deflection; 
column stability. 

PHY 323— Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221, EGR/PHY 330, and 
MAT 341. 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the 
continuity, momentum, and energy conservation 
relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

PHY 330— Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208 
Basic concepts of thermodynamics: proper- 
ties of substances; conservation principles; the 
first and second laws of thermodynamics; en- 
tropy; analysis of thermodynamic systems. 

PHY 380— Introductory Quantum Mechanics 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213 or PHY 219 and MAT 
207. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to quantum mechanical prin- 
ciples with applications in atomic and molecular 
structure. 

PHY 417— Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 or 211 and MAT 207. 
PHY 218 or 212 and MAT 341 are recom- 
mended. Offered on demand. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles 
and of systems of particles are developed using 
Newtonian principles. 



Marine Science Center Offerings 

The following course, offered at the Skidaway 
Island Marine Science Center, is cooperatively 
sponsored by Armstrong State College, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, Georgia Southern Col- 
lege, Savannah State College, and the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. 



OCE 430— Applied Oceanography (6-4-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 128, 129; BIO 101, 10; 
Offered Summer Quarter. 

The aspects of physical, chemical, and bic 
logical sciences which are marine oriented a 
applied to specific problems in the ocean am 
its environs. Collection and interpretation of fieli 
data stressed, utilizing vessels and equipmer 
of the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. 



GRADUATE COURSES 



The Chemistry MEd program has been deac 
tivated, but the department continues to offe 
limited graduate course offerings. Student 
should check with the chemistry department fc 
complete information on course offerings. 



Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 501— Chemistry of Life (5-0-5) 

(See CHE 301 for course description.) 

CHE 507— Principles of Chemical 
Processes I (3-0-3) 

(See CHE 307 for course description.) 

CHE 508— Principles of Chemical 
Processes II (3-0-3) 

(See CHE 308 for course description.) 

CHE 541-542— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

(See CHE 341-342 for course description.) 

CHE 543— Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

(See CHE 343 for course description.) 

CHE 544, 545, 546 — Organic Chemistry 
Laboratory I, II, III (0-3-1) 

(See CHE 344, 345, 346 for coure 
description.) 

CHE 580 — Quantitative Instrumental (3-6-5 

(See CHE 380 for course description.) 

CHE 600 — Introduction to Chemical 
Research (2-0-2) 

This course outlines systematic methods 
literature research and preparation resean 
outlines from reference ot original articles. 

CHE 622— Inorganic Chemistry (3-0-3) 

Modern theory of structures and bondir 
acid-base theories, and properties of some ra 
elements and unusual compounds will be d 
tailed. The latter includes nonstoichiometr 
compounds, rare gas compounds, and coc 
dination complexes. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



95 



HE 641 — Advanced Organic Chemistry 
-0-3) 

(See CHE 441 for course description.) 

HE 651— History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

(See CHE 451 for course description.) 

HE 661— Biochemistry I (5-0-5) 

(See CHE 461 for course description.) 

HE 662— Biochemistry II (5-0-5) 

(See CHE 462 for course description.) 

HE 663— Clinical Chemistry (4-3-5) 

(See CHE 463 for course description.) 

HE 666— Biochemistry Laboratory (0-6-2) 

(See CHE 466 for course description.) 

IE 681— Advanced Instrumental I (1-3-2) 

(See CHE 481 for course description.) 

iE 682— Advanced Instrumental II (1-3-2) 

(See CHE 482 for course description.) 

iE 683— Advanced Instrumental III (1-3-2) 

(See CHE 483 for course description.) 

IE 691-692-693— Physical Chemistry 
3-5) 

;See CHE 491-492-493 for course descrip- 
n.) 

i \E 721— Chemistry for High School 
achers (4-3-5) 

This course covers CHEM study material and 
;o Chemical Bonding. Approach material for 
}h school teachers. 

\E 731 — Development of Chemical 
eories (3-0-3) 

A study of the basic principles upon which 
HI known chemical theories are founded. Top- 
; such as the kinetic molecular theory, chem- 
al equilibria, and spectroscopy will be 
>cussed. 

\E 794 — Chemistry for Elementary 
achers (5-0-5) 

A study of the more important metallic and 
in-metallic elements with emphasis on prac- 
al application at the elementary school level. 

iE 798— Seminar (2-0-2) 

'Discussion of selected topics. 



lysical Science Offerings 

>T 601 — Astronomy for Teachers (5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include the solar system, 
jllar evolution, stars and star systems, and 
3thods in astronomy. 



GEL 601 — Geology for Teachers (5-0-5) 

A survey of physical and historical geology. 
Topic subjects will include a geologic history, 
plate tectonics, and identification of minerals 
and rocks. 

MET 601— Meterology for Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the atmosphere, weather, and cli- 
mate. 

OCE 601— Oceanography for Teachers 
(5-0-5) 

Topic subjects will include origin and struc- 
ture of ocean floors, tides and currents, chem- 
ical and physical properties of sea water, and 
applications of oceanographic research. 

PHS 795 — Earth Science of Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Study of the compositions of earth, classifi- 
cation and identification of rocks and minerals 
in a format appropriate for teachers of elemen- 
tary age children. 

PHS 701 — Principles of Astronomy, 
Geology and Meterology (5-0-5) 

A study of unifying principles associated with 
the disciplines of astronomy, geology and met- 
erology. Emphasis will be placed on materials, 
demonstrations and testing associated with the 
physical sciences. 



Physics Offerings 

PHY 510— Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 310 for course description) 

PHY 512— Digital Electronics (3-6-5) 

(See PHY 312 for course description) 

PHY 522— Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 322 for course description) 

PHY 523— Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 323 for course description) 

PHY 530— Thermodynamics (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 330 for course description) 

PHY 580— Introduction to Quantum 
Mechanics (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 330 for course description) 

PHY 602— Physics for Secondary School 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the principles of physics appro- 
priate for teachers of physics and physical sci- 
ence. National curricula such as the Harvard 
Project Physics and PSSC will be studied. 



96 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PHY 603 — Physics Laboratory for Science 
Teachers (3-4-5) 

A study of the theory and practice of selected 
laboratory exercises and demonstrations. 

PHY 617— Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

(See PHY 417 for course description) 

Course at Marine Science Center 

The following course is offered at the Marine 
Science Center on Skidaway Island and is open 
to both graduate and undergraduate stu- 
dents. This course is cooperatively sponsored 
by Armstrong State College, Georgia Institute of 
Technology, Georgia State University, Georgia 
Southern College, and the University of Georgia. 

OCE 630— -Applied Oceanography (6-4-5) 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry and General 
Biology. Offered Summers. 

The aspects of physical, chemical, and bio- 
logical sciences which are marine oriented as 
applied to specific problems in the ocean and 
its environs. Collection and interpretation of field 
data stressed utilizing vessels and equipment 
of the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. 



Fine Arts 

Faculty 

Anderson, James, Department Head 

Campbell, Michael 

Harris, Robert 

Jensen, John 

Jensen, Linda 

Schmidt, John 

Schultz, Lucinda 

Vogelsang, Kevin 

The Department of Fine Arts offers the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree with majors in art and music, 
the Bachelor of Music Education degree, and in 
cooperation with the Department of Secondary 
Education, the Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree with a major in Art Education. 

Placement Examinations 

Transfer and new students in music must take 
placement examinations as appropriate in ap- 
plied music, music theory, and music history. 
Acceptance of transfer credit towards gradua- 
tion requirements in each area is contingent 
upon the results of the examination. 

Transfer students in art will be required to take 
a placement examination in art history. Addi- 



tionally, coursework at other institutions in studi 
art may not be counted towards graduation un 
a portfolio of artwork is submitted demonstrate 
competency in those areas in which classe 
have been completed. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

There are a variety of departmental policie 
and regulations which affect music majors. Ii 
eluded are requirements for recital attendant 
ensemble participation, piano proficiency, r< 
cital participation, applied music levels, and.tr 
Rising Junior Applied Music Examination, 
copy of A Handbook of Policies and Regulatior 
for Music Majors will be given to each mus 
student. 

Please see the "Fees" section of this catalc 
for information on applied music fees. 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) have a di 
tinctly useful place in the Fine Arts curriculur 
The intent of the DIS is for an enrichment e 
perience that otherwise is unavailable in tr 
classroom. Normally, regular curriculum cours 
work should not be completed by individu 
study. 

However, if a regular course is to be taug 
by individual study, the following criteria mi 
be met before approval may be granted by tl 
department head: 1) the course must not ha 
been offered during the preceding three qu< 
ters nor be scheduled during the succeedii 
three quarters; 2) the student must gain the a 
proval of the anticipated instructor; 3) transit 
students must gain the permission of not oi 
the department head, but the dean of facul 
and of the college from which the stude 
comes; and 4) the student must demonstrate. 1 
writing, that a hardship will exist if permission 
denied, for the student to take an individi 
study. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
ART 

Hoi 

A. General Requirements ! 

Area I I 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; PHI 200, 
201; MUS 200 S 



FINE ARTS 



97 



Areall 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 222 or 

290 10 

2. Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, PSY 101, 

SOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. ART 111, 112, 201, 

202, 213 25 

2. MUS200or210 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

;. Courses in the Major Field 35 

1. ART 204, 313, 330, 340, 370, 

413 30 

2. One from: ART 271, 

272, 273 5* 

'■. Special Course Requirements 20 

1. Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

2. PHI 400 5 

'. Electives 40 

Recommend ART 271, 272, 273* 
.. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 
day not be duplicated with major field, Area 
and elective requirements.) 



HOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
i ^CHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
JSIC 
I 

Hours 

. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1 ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273: ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2 Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14or 191. 1 15or 192; POS 

113 15 



2. One course from: ANT 201, 

ECO 201, PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 

213 18 

2. MUS 140 6 

3. MUS 251 or 254 6 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 33 

1. MUS 240, 281, 340, 371, 372, 

373 24 

2. Two Courses from MUS 312, 
361, 412 6 

3. One Course from MUS 41 6, 425, 
427 3 

C. Track Options 38 

1. General Track: Electives 38 

One of the following perform- 
ance/composition tracks. Pre- 
requisite: Departmental 
Permission Only. 

2. Keyboard Performance 

MUS 258, 440, 420, 421 15 

Electives 23 

3. Vocal Performance 

MUS 313, 314, 315, 440 15 

Electives 23 

4. Wind Instrument Performance 

MUS 440, 481 9 

One course from MUS 31 2, 361 , 

412 3* 

One course from MUS 432 or 

433 3 

Electives 23 

5. Composition 

MUS422 12 

One course from MUS 31 2, 361 , 

412 3* 

Electives 23 

D. Special Course Requirements 25 

1 . ART 271 , 272, 273 (may not be 
duplicated with Area I 
requirement) 10 

2. Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

3 RECITAL PERFORMANCES 

(determined by option) 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 197 

'(May not be duplicated with Major Field Requirements) 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area I .' 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, SOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN200; PSY 101 10 

2. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140, 236, 

281 20 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field .65-68 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 237, 238, 

239 15 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 312, 330, 331, 

361,412 17 

4. MUS 371, 372, 373 9 

5. One of the following emphases: 

A. Choral Emphasis 

MUS 353, 31 3, 423, 480, and 

314or315 12 

B. Instrumental Emphasis 
MUS 227, 352, 416, 424, 

481 12 

C. Keyboard Emphasis 

MUS 227, 425, 420 or 421, 
423 or 424, 352 or 353, 480 

or 481 15 

C. Professional Sequence 30 

1 . EXC 310; EDN 335, 491 , 492, 

493 25 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 5 

D. Special Course Requirements 

One half of senior recital 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196-199 



PROGRAM Ft)R THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION II 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF ART EDUCATION 

Houi 

A. General Requirements 1C 

Area 1 2 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 1 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 

Area II 2 

1. MAT 101, 290 1 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 1 

Area III 2 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 : 1 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 

ArealV ■ 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 - 

2. ART 111, 112, 201, 213 \: i 

AreaV 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 

2. Three activity courses 

State Requirement 

HIS 251' or 252 

B. Teaching Concentration ..58- 

. 1. ART 202, 204 

2. ART 271, 272, 273* .10- 

3. ART 313, 330, 340, 350, 351, 
370 

4. One course from: ART 31 4, 362, 
363 

5. ART 400 

C. Professional Sequence 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 491, 492, 
493 ",.,. 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 - 

D. Electives ( 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations ........._ 

TOTAL 1 
**May not be duplicated in Area I. 






FINE ARTS 



99 



nor Concentrations 

Minor concentrations in art and in music are 
ailable through the Department of Fine Arts. 
ie requirements of each are: 

Hours 

t 25 

. ART 111, 112 10 

!. One course selected from: ART 271, 

272,273 5 

\. Two courses selected from: 

ART 201, 202, 21 1 , 213, 214, 314, 330, 

331, 340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

usic 29 

MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

Applied Music (six hours in one 

area) 6 

Music Ensemble 251 

or 254 6 

Music History and 

Literature 8 

MUS 000 (recital 

attendance) 



ssociate in Arts with Concentrations 

HOURS 

oncentration in Art 25 

1. ART 111, 112 10 

1. One course selected from: ART 271, 
272,273 5 

3. Two courses selected from: 

ART 114, 201 , 202, 21 1 , 213, 214, 215, 
330, 331, 340, 362, 363, 364 370, 

413 10 

oncentration in Music 29 

I MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one 

area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 251, 254 6 

4. Music History and 

Literature 8 

5. Piano Proficiency 

6. MUS 000 (Recital Attendance) 



rt Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to 
on-art majors. 



ART 111— Basic Design I (4-2-5) 

Fall. 

An introduction to two-dimensional design 
and graphic communication. 

ART 112— Basic Design II (4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better 
in Art III or permission of instructor. 

The fundamentals of three-dimensional de- 
sign introduced through sculptural projects in 
various media. 

ART 200— Introduction to the Visual Arts 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and 
techniques and their application in masterworks 
of art from all ages. Not recommended for art 
majors. 

ART 201— Painting I (4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in ART 111 or ART 213 or permission of the 
instructor. 

A basic course in acrylic or oil painting from 
observed and secondary sources. 

ART 202— Painting II (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in ART 201 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of Painting I with an increasing 
emphasis on student selected painting prob- 
lems. 

ART 204 — Introduction to Photography 
(4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction to black and white photographic 
aesthetics and processes. Including study of the 
mechanical-optical functions of cameras and 
enlargers as well as printing and processing of 
film in a controlled environment. 

ART 211— Graphic Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or permission of the in- 
structor. 

The fundamentals of visual communication in- 
cluding design, layout, typography and repro- 
duction as related to modern advertising 
techniques. 

ART 213— Drawing I (4-2-5) 

Winter 

A fundamental course emphasizing represen- 
tational drawing from still-life, landscape, and 
figural form. 



100 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 271— History of Art (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A survey of the visual arts, painting, sculpture, 
and architecture, in Western Civilization from 
pre-history to the Late Middle Ages. 

ART 272— History of Art II (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Italian Renaissance through Rococo art. 

ART 273— History of Art III (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Modern Art, the late eighteenth through the 
twentieth centuries. 

ART 313— Drawing II (4-2-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 
213 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on 
figuration, composition, and color. 

ART 314 — Intermediate Photography 
(3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of the in- 
structor. 

A continuation of the study of the aesthetics 
and processes in black and white photography. 

ART 315— Color Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 204, or permission of the 
instructor. 

An introduction of the principles, aesthetics, 
and print processes of color photography. 

ART 316— Hand Colored and Manipulated 
Silver Print (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: ART 204, or permission of the 
instructor. 

Exploration of a variety of media and tech- 
niques to enhance and alter a silver print. 

ART 320— Art for the Elementary Teacher 
(4-2-5) 

Fall, Spring. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A study, with studio experience, of materials 
and methods for teaching art at the elementary 
school level. 

ART 330— Ceramics I (4-2-5) 

Introduction to fundamentals of wheel thrown 
pottery, handbuilding techniques and ceramic 
sculpture. Emphasis is on decoration, form, 
craftsmanship and creativity. Traditional glazing 



and firing techniques as well as an exploratic 
into non-traditional methods of coloring and coi 
struction. 

ART 331— Pottery Techniques (4-2-5) 

Emphasis in on techniques of pottery utilizir 
the potter's wheel. 

ART 333— Ceramic Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission of i 
structor. 

Emphasis is on developing ideas into larg> 
scale ceramic sculpture. Individual attentic 
and direction is facilitated. Projects may indue 
pottery, the figure, abstractions, wall relief ar 
mixed media construction. 

ART 340— Printmaking I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic printmaking ide< 
and terminology. Projects will include one 
more of the following: linoleum, woodblock, i 
taglio, silkscreen and non-traditional methods 
making prints. 

ART 350— Art in the Lower School (4-2-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructc 
Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques ar 
materials for teaching art in the elementa 
school. 

ART 351— Art in the Middle and Upper 
School (4-2-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of the instru 
tor. Art education majors only. 

the analysis and evaluation of techniques ai 
materials for teaching art in junior and sen 
high school. 

ART 362 — Enameling/Jewelry Making 
(4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction of process in the production oj 
variety of enameled art works, and of process? 
in the making of jewelry, both handmade a I 
cast. 

ART 363— Batik/Textile Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Exploration of a variety of processes useCi 
applying original designs to fabric. 

ART 364— Fibers Construction (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Development of processes used in on and 
techniques in weaving and in contemporary 
ber wall hangings. 



FINE ARTS 



101 



^RT 370— Sculpture I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic sculpture ideas, ter- 
ninology, and processes. Emphasis is on de- 
eloping technique and ideas. Projects may 
ldude wood, metal, clay, plaster, or other. 

(RT 400 — Seminar in Art Education 
3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art 
•ducation majors only. 

A survey of current trends in instructional and 
ssearch techniques. 

UTT 413— Drawing III (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or higher 
l ART 313 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of Drawing II with increasingly 
:omplex problems in concept, design, and 
schnique. 

^RT 489— Selected Studies in Art (V-V(1-5) 

Offered on demand 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet 
pecial institutional and community needs. May 
>e repeated for credit. 

VRT 490— Directed Individual Study 
V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 

\BJ 491— Internship (V-V-(1-4-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
J ermission of instructor and department head 
ind an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
study, work, and/or research. Projects usually 
encompass the entire academic quarter and are 
jnder the joint supervision of the sponsoring in- 
stitution and his/her faculty supervisor. 



Applied Music Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to 
ion-music majors. 

MUS 130— Applied Music (one credit) 

Prerequisite: Sufficient music background, 
determined by audition of MUS 110. 

One twenty-five minute lesson per week in 
Drass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice, 
Dr woodwinds. Applicable to a music degree 
only for a secondary applied credit. May be re- 
peated for credit. 

MUS 140 — Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to music majors and a lim- 
ited number of non-majors by audition only. 



Private and class instruction in brass, organ, 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds. 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 240 — Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 140 
level as determined by jury examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 340 — Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the 
Rising Junior Applied Music Examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds. 
May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 440— Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the MUS 340 
level as determined by jury examination. Music 
majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, 
percussion, piano, strings, voice or woodwinds. 
May be repeated for credit. 

Music Offerings 

MUS 000— Recital Attendance (0-V-0) 

A requirement for music majors and minors 
which consists of attendance at a designated 
number of concerts/recitals each quarter. 

MUS 110— Basic Music Theory (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

An introduction to music theory for students 
needing skills for MUS 111. May not be used for 
credit toward a degree in music. 

MUS 111— Elementary Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 110 or equivalent by 
examination. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical prin- 
ciples of music including sightsinging, ear-train- 
ing and keyboard harmony. 

MUS 112— Elementary Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in MUS 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 1 1 1 with emphasis on 
part-writing and diatonic material. 

MUS 113— Elementary Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in MUS 112 or permission of instructor 

A continuation of MUS 112 introducing sev- 
enth chords and diatonic modulation. 



102 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 114 — Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on basic jazz literature, chord sym- 
bol, melodic patterns, ear training, melodic con- 
cepts and analysis of improvised solos. 

MUS 200 — introduction to Music Literature 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student un- 
derstand music by means of analysis of style, 
forms, and media of musical expression. 

MUS 201— Understanding Jazz (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A non-technical survey of jazz performers and 
styles with emphasis on recorded literature. The 
course will examine elements of jazz such as 
improvisation, instrumentation and rhythm and 
trace their development from New Orleans to 
contemporary fusion music. 

MUS 202— Survey of Rock Music (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A non-technical survey of rock music and its 
styles with emphasis on recorded literature. 

MUS 203— Popular Music in 20th Century 
America (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A survey of popular music from ragtime to 
present. Examination of popular music and its 
relationship to American culture. 

MUS 211— Intermediate Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in 
MUS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 113 with emphasis on 
chromatic harmony. 

MUS 212— Intermediate Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in MUS 211 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 21 1 . 

MUS 213— Intermediate Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher 
in MUS 212 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of MUS 212 with emphasis on 
twentieth century techniques. 

MUS 214 — Jazz Improvisation II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 114 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Emphasis on the analysis and performance of 
intermediate jazz literature and composition in 
contemporary styles. 



MUS 224— Class Guitar (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Designed for the development of basic skills 
in playing the guitar for accompanying. Focuses' 
on chorded styles and their application to music 
such as folk songs and popular music. 

MUS 226— Class Piano I, II, III (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. Students enrolling in II or 
must have received a grade of "C" or higher in 
the preceding class. 

A study of keyboard techniques with empha 
sis on the skills needed to fulfill the piano pro 
ficiency requirement. 

MUS 227— Class Voice (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music ma- 
jor status or permission of the instructor. 

A study of voice production techniques witr 
practical application to standard song literature 
Not open to students whose principal instrumen 
is voice. 

MUS 236— Brass Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of brass in 
strument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 237— Woodwind Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to. the principles of woodwin 
instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 238 — Percussion Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of percussic 
instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 239— String Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 
An introduction to the principles of string irj 
strument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 250— Pep Band (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter. Open to qualified students. 

A group to provide spirit music at school atr 
letic functions. May be taken for acade.m 
credit, at most, four times. 

MUS 251— Concert Band (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from the standar 
literature for symphonic band. Public perforn 
ances are a part of the course requirement. 

MUS 252— Jazz Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Open to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be selected from a variety of ja; 
styles and periods. Public performances are 
part of the course requirement. 



FINE ARTS 



103 



US 253— Armstrong Singers (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all students by audition. 
izz Choir. Public performances are a part of 
9 course requirement. 

US 254— Concert Choir (0-3-1) 

Membership open to all students. Ability to 
ad music desired but not required. Repertoire 
be selected each quarter from the standard 
loral concert literature. There will be public 
>rfomnances each quarter. 

US 255— Chamber Ensemble (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the perform- 
ice media of brass, woodwind, string, key- 
)ard, voice, and percussion instruments. 

US 256— Wind Ensemble (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand. Permission of instructor 

>iy 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard 
nd ensemble literature. Public performances 
e part of the course requirement. 

US 257— Opera Workshop (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Preparation and performance of work or ex- 

>rpts of works from the operatic repertoire. 

US 258 — Keyboard Accompanying 
-2-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

A study of the basic principles of accompan- 

•ent 

US 259— Oratorio Chorus (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all. 

Evening rehearsals. Literature to be selected 

)m the larger choral works. Ability to read mu- 

I: not required. Public performances are part 

* the course requirement. 

US 281— Conducting (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MUS 113. Music majors 

ily. 

' An introduction to the techniques of con- 
ucting and interpretation. 

US 312— Form and Analysis (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213 

usic majors only. 

t The study of the principles of form in music 
•id techniques of harmonic analysis. 

US 313 — English and Italian Lyric Diction 
id Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prereqisite: Music Majors Only 
! A study of the International Phonetic Alphabet, 
le phonetics of English and Italian for singing 



and a survey of representative English and Ital- 
ian vocal repertoire. 

MUS 314 — German Lyric Diction and 
Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 217, music majors only 
Orientation to the phonetics of German for 
singing by means of the International Phonetic 
Alphabet and a survey of representative Ger- 
man vocal repertoire. 

MUS 315 — French Lyric Diction and 
Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 217, music majors only. 

Orientation to the phonetics of French for sing- 
ing by means of the International Phonetic Al- 
phabet and a survey of representative French 
vocal repertoire. 

MUS 320 — Music for the Elementary 
Teacher (5-0-5) 

On demand. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A study of the materials and methods for 
teaching general music in the elementary class- 
room. Not for music majors. 

MUS 330— Music in the Lower School 
(4-0-4) 

Winter. Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizing anal- 
ysis and evaluation of techniques and materials 
for teaching music in the lower school. 

MUS 331 — Music in the Middle and Upper 
School (4-0-4) 

Spring. Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizing anal- 
ysis and evaluation of techniques and materials 
for teaching music in the middle and senior high 
schools. 

MUS 352— Band Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music ma- 
jors only. 

A course dealing with the organization, main- 
tenance and development of school instrumen- 
tal ensembles. 

MUS 353— Choral Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 227 
Music majors only. 

A course dealing with the organization and 
development of school choral organizations, 
problems of choral singing, and fundamentals 
of choral conducting. 



104 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 361 — Orchestration and Arranging 
(3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. 
Music majors only. 

An introduction to the techniques of arranging 
and scoring for vocal and instrumental ensem- 
bles. 

MUS 371— Music History I (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: One year of 
music theory or permission of the instructor. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization 
from its origins through the Renaissance. 

MUS 372— Music History II (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: One year of 
music theory or permission of the instructor. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in 
the Baroque and Classic Periods. 

MUS 373— Music History III (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 21 3 or 
permission of the instructor. Music majors only. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in 
the Romantic Period and in the 20th century. 

MUS 411— Composition (V-V-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. 
Music, majors only. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 412— Counterpoint (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. 
Music majors only. 

A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th cen- 
tury music. 

MUS 416 — Topics in Instrumental 
Repertoire and Pedagogical Techniques 
(3-0-3). 

Offered on demand. Junior status or permis- 
sion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit 
as topics vary. 

A survey of instrumental literature and teach- 
ing techniques for brass, guitar, percussion, or 
woodwind instruments. 

MUS 420— Piano Literature I (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and 
aesthetic features of piano literature of the Ba- 
roque and Classic periods. 

MUS 421— Piano Literature II (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and 
aesthetic features of piano literature of the Ro- 
mantic and Contemporary periods. 

MUS 422— Opera Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 200. 
A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and 



aesthetic features of the lyric theatre from B 
roque to the present. 

MUS 423— Choral Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior st 
tus or permission of the instructor. Music majo 
only. 

A survey of the literature of choral ensembl 

MUS 424— Band Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior st 
tus or permission of the instructor. Music majo 
only. 

A survey of the literature of band and wir 
ensemble. 

MUS 425— Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music m 
jors only. 

A study of pedagogical" techniques of tl 
piano and a survey of literature suited for teac 
ing purposes. 

MUS 427— Vocal Pedagogy (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of pedagogical techniques of tl 
voice and a survey of literature suited for teac 
ing purposes. 

MUS 428 — Marching Band Techniques 
(2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Music majors only or permissi 
of the instructor. 

A study of techniques used in show desi 
and instruction of the high school marchi 
band. 

MUS 429— Art Song (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 20< 
A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, a 

aesthetic features of the art song from its orig i 

to the present day. 

MUS 432 — Symphonic Music Literature 
(3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 20( 
A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, aJ 

aesthetic features of symphonic music from 3 

origins to the present day. 

MUS 433 — Instrumental Chamber Music 
Literature (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 20' 
A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, ei 
aesthetic features of instrumental chamber r| 
sic from its origins to the present day. 



GOVERNMENT 



105 



: dUS 480 — Advanced Choral Conducting 
3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 281 , 
JH2, 361. Music majors only. 
I Advanced techniques for the choral conduc- 
or. 

AUS 481— Advanced Instrumental 
Conducting (3-0-3) 

I Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 281, 
M2, 261. Music majors only. 

Advanced techniques for the instrumental 
(conductor. 

AUS 489— Selected Studies in Music 
V-V-(1-5)) 

I Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet 
pe'cial institutional and community needs. May 
)e repeated for credit. 

AUS 490— Directed Individual Study 
V-V-(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement, 
^usic majors only. 

rfUS 491— Internship (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor and department head 
ind an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed course project involving off-campus 
>tudy, work, and/or research. Projects usually 
sncompass the entire academic quarter and are 
jnder the joint supervision of the sponsoring in- 
stitution and his/her faculty supervisor. 



Government 

Faculty 

vlurphy, Dennis: Department Head 

Brown, George 

Ealy, Steven 

Kearnes, John 

Magnus, Robert 

Megathlin, William 

Moore, Richard 

Palmiotto, Michael 

Rhee, Steve 

Graduate Faculty 

The Department of Government embraces the 
ideal of liberal education and views education 
in related professional areas as an extension, 



rather than the antithesis, of liberal education. 
Consequently, all departmental programs and 
courses are conceptually-based, thereby ena- 
bling students to develop a theoretical sophis- 
tication applicable to practical realities So 
conceived, courses and programs achieve cur- 
ricular integrity. 

The Department firmly believes that even cur- 
ricular integrity is not enough, however. Instruc- 
tional effectiveness is its inseparable 
complement, and attainment of these twin goals 
serves as the primary purpose of the Depart- 
ment of Government. The ongoing program of 
faculty development ensures that the staff of 
highly qualified educators— each selected for 
service on the basis of solid professional cre- 
dentials — continually achieves that primary pur- 
pose. 

In addition, the Department of Government 
highly values both research and service. To the 
extent of resources available, the Department 
encourages research by both faculty and stu- 
dents and service to the School, the College and 
the community. 

It is within the foregoing context that the De- 
partment of Government both requires the 
G.R.E. (or L.S.A.T.) as an exit examination for 
its majors and offers the following undergradu- 
ate programs, concentrations and courses. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE 
OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2 ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; or 
MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3 MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5 HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6 PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7 PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ100, 103,210,280.290.301. 
305, and two CJ electives 
C Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 



106 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE 
OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN 
CORRECTIONS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; or 
MUS200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252, POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101, SOC201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103,210,280,290,301, 
303, 360, and one CJ elective 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 

At least 45 hours of each of these two pro- 
grams must be completed at Armstrong. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Students who intend to major in Criminal Jus- 
tice should complete Criminal Justice 100 be- 
fore the end of the .freshman year and should 
complete all general education requirements as 
soon as possible. 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 
200; PHI 201; ENG 222 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220, or 
290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. SOC 201 ; PSY 1 01 ; ECO 201 or 
202; ANT 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290 20 

2. One course selected from: 
ANT 201, ECO 201, 202, DRS 
228, SOC 201, PSY 101 5 



3. HI&251 or 252 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Area of Concentration 30 

1 . CJ 301 , 303, 305, 360, 390, and 

'440 or 490 30 

C. Electives from Related Areas 65 

1. Sixty-five hours chosen from a 
list of selected electives. Except 
for students pursuing a minor in 
another department, no more 
than fifteen hours may be taken 
from any one department ex- 
cept Government. Seven of 
these courses should be 300- 
400 level courses 65 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



Majors in Political Science 

The major in Political Science may take three 
distinct forms: Political Science, perse, Politica 
Science with Teacher Certification, or Public 
Administration. 

To complete a Political Science major require? 
forty quarter hours of upper division courses ir 
the field with grades of "C" or better in eacl 
course. Further, the program must include a 
least one course from each of the following 
Ame'rican Political Institutions, International Re 
lations, Political Theory, and Comparative Gov 
ernment. The major allows the option of a foreigi 
language (French or German preferred) througl 
the 1 03 level or a sequence of computer scienc* 
courses. Students who contemplate graduatt 
work in Political Science are strongly advised t( 
take the foreign language option and to continue 
their linguistic study beyond the 103 level. 

Programs in Public Administration and Politi 
cal Science with Teacher Certification are mon 
structured in order to prepare students ade 
quately to meet the demands of their profession; 
and appropriate licensing agencies. 

Scholarships in Political Science 

Limited scholarship aid is available annually 
Interested students are invited to inquire in th< 
Department of Government office for details. 



GOVERNMENT 



107 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101. 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; BIO 111, 112; CHE 121, 
122; PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, PSY 101, 

SOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. One of the sequences: 

A. Foreign language 101, 102, 
103 or 

B. CS 115, 142, and 231 15 

3. Related courses 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

At least one course from each 
of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 
POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360,/ 
401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418, 
419; CJ 390 5-25 

2. International Affairs— POS 320. 
321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, 

429 5-25 

3. Political Theory— POS 333, 

334 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 
POS 345, 346, 348 / 349, 

445, 447 5-25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 25 

To be chosen in fields such as 
Computer Science, Economics. 
Geography, Mathematics. See 
Department for exhaustive list.. 25 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
POLITICAL SCIENCE (with teacher 
certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

ArealV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 
orCS 115, 142, 231 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, SOC201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

At least one course from each 
of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 
POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360. 
401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418. 
419; CJ390 5-25 

2. International Relations— POS 
320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 
426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory— POS 333, 

334 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 
POS 345, 346, 348, 349. 

445, 447 5-25 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the 
following areas: 

A. HIS 251 or 252 and ap- 
proved 300+ elective 

B. ECO 201 and approved 
300+ elective 



108 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Approved electives in be- 
havioral sciences (ANT, 
PSY, SOC) 

D. GEO 211, 212 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 
449, 481, 482, 483 35 

2. PSY 301 orEDU302 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



2. Public Administration 

PA/POS 303, 401, 403, 418; CJ 

390 25 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. CS301, 308 10 

2. SOC 350 or MAT 220 5 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
• 201; BIO 111, 112; CHE 121, 

122; PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113; ECO 201 10 

ArealV 30 

1. CS 142, 231, 242 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252; ECO 202; SOC 

201 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1 . One course from each of the 

following 20 

A. American Political Institu- 
tions— POS 305, 317, 318, 
360, 411, 412, 415, 419 5 

B. International Affairs— POS 
320,321,325,326,329,424, 
426, 429 5 

C. Political Theory— POS 333, 

334 5 

D. Comparative Government — 
POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 
447 5 



Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Government offers a num- 
ber of minor concentrations. 

A minor in Criminal Justice or in Political Sci- 
ence has great practical value. Its notation on 
the transcript indicates to an employer that the 
applicant has some solid liberal arts back- 
ground with its accompanying insight into the 
development and functioning of modern society, 
and that the applicant has made an extra effort 
to refine research and writing skills so essential 
to dealing with that society. Whatever the major 
one chooses, such a minor will strengthen the 
student's academic record. 

Minor concentrations are available in Eco- 
nomics, International Studies, Russian Studies 
Public Administration, Criminal Justice, and Poj 
litical Science. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or bette 
in each course, require: 

Hours 

International Studies 21 

(assumes competency in one modern 
foreign language through the 103 
level). 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 

2. One course from: POS 320, 321, 
345, 346, 348, 349 

3. Two courses from: POS 426, 
429; HIS 321, 330, 350, 355, 
435 1C 

Political Science 2C| 

Twenty hours of 300+ level 
POS courses, with at least 
one course from each of the 
four concentration areas of 
POS 2C 

Russian Studies 2C 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion 

of RUS 101-103) I 

2. POS 349 



GOVERNMENT 



109 



3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 

428, 431 , 435, 481 ; POS 440 ... 10 
(a multi-departmental minor) 

ublic Administration 25 

CJ 390; PA 303, 401, 403, 418 25 
conomics 25 

1. ECO 201, 202, 203 15 

2. Two courses selected from: 
ECO 320, 330, 340, 

363, 445 10 

riminal Justice 25 

CJ 100, 210 or 301, 303, 305, 
360 25 

rimina! Justice Offerings 

J 100 — Introduction to Criminal Justice 
5-0-5) 

j Offered each quarter. 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

This survey course examines the emergence 
f formal institutions established within the 
vmerican experience to deal with criminal be- 
avior. The philosophical and cultural origins of 
ne criminal justice system and current trends in 
riminal justice are emphasized. 

*J 103 — Developing Interpersonal 
Communications Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

The emphasis of this course will be placed 
jpon the development of interpersonal com- 
nunication skills, i.e. skills that can be effectively 
jtilized on the job to improve interaction among 
employees and between employees and the 
xjblic. 

ZJ 203 — Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

History and development of criminal law with 
definitions and general penalties. Special em- 
Dhasis will be placed upon the Criminal Code 
of Georgia. 

CJ 204 — Criminal Investigation (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. 
Special techniques employed in criminal inves- 
tigation, such as crime scene searches, the use 
of informants, and the techniques of surveillance 
will be emphasized as well as the presentation 
of police cases in court. 



CJ 210— Criminology (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

The nature and extent of crime in the United 
States; assessment and evaluation of various 
factors and influences that lead to criminal be- 
havior; various measures proposed for the con- 
trol of criminal behavior. 

CJ 250 — Directed Readings in Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 100. 

A course designed to permit each student to 
pursue an approved topic through independent 
study and research under the guidance and di- 
rection of the instructor. 

CJ 280 — Ethics in Criminal Justice Practice 
and Research (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 113 or consent 
of the instructor. 

Analysis of ethical concepts, principles, and 
prescriptive moral judgments in the practice and 
research of criminal justice. 

CJ 290— Criminal Procedure (3-0-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent of in- 
structor. 

A survey of the distinctive features of, and the 
basis for, American Criminal Law buttressed by 
an analysis of leading court decisions relative 
to procedural rights emanating from the Bill of 
Rights. 

CJ 301 — Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of in- 
structor. 

A survey of theories of juvenile delinquency; 
the sociological, biological, and psychological 
factors involved in juvenile delinquency and the 
modern trends in prevention and treatment. 

CJ 302— Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A natural 
science laboratory sequence or consent of in- 
structor. 

An introduction to the problems and tech- 
niques of scientific criminal investigation. Em- 
phasis will be placed on familiarizing the student 
with the role of science and technology in mod- 
ern law enforcement. 

CJ 303— Penology (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: CJ 100, or consent of in- 
structor 

This course deals with the analysis and eval- 
uation of both historical and contemporary cor- 
rectional systems. This course will also deal with 



110 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



the development, organization, operation and 
results of the different systems of corrections 
found in America. 

CJ 304 — Probation and Parole (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 303 or 
consent of instructor. ' 

This course will deal with the development, 
organization, operation and results of systems 
of probation and parole as substitutes for in- 
carceration. 

CJ 305 — Law Enforcement Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of in- 
structor. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural 
and historical background of the police idea. 
The course is conceptually oriented and will deal 
with concepts such as the role of the police in 
contemporary society, the quasi-military organ- 
ization of the police, and community relations. 

CJ 307— Community Based Treatment 
(5-0-5) 

• Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 303 or 
consent of instructor. 

This course will investigate the different com- 
munity based treatment programs. An emphasis 
will be placed on investigating the function of 
halfway houses and the use of volunteers in cor- 
rections. 

CJ 360— Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 113 or consent 
of the instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal in- 
stitution. Sources and functions of both civil and 
criminal law, as well as operation of the legal 
process, are studied from the perspectives of 
jurisprudence, pol tical science, and sociology. 
(Identical with POS 360.) 

CJ 380— Law of Evidence (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: CJ 360 or 
consent of instructor. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence 
in criminal cases. Particular subjects will include 
burden of proof, hearsay evidence, and the prin- 
ciples of exclusion and selection. 

CJ 390— Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: ENG 1 01 and 1 02 and per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course deals with the methods and tech- 
niques of research in the behavioral sciences. 
Emphasis will be placed on learning how to eval- 
uate research. 



CJ 391 — Legal Research/Law Mini-Thesis 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: CJ 360, 
ENG 102. 

Open to students of any major, this course 
comprises the major areas of legal research and 
writing; finding and using appropriate legal re- 
search tools and resources and applying these 
to develop and complete a scholarly legal re- 
search paper. 

CJ 410 — Criminality and Abnormal Behavior 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and either 
CJ 100 or permission of instructor. 

The course examines the interface betweer 
abnormal behavior, including mental illness, 
and criminality by presenting recent develop- 
ments in the identification, classification, anc 
treatment of criminals. Special emphasis is 
given to understanding the sometimes bizarre 
behavioral patterns and motivations of repea 
offenders, such as child molesters, sex crimi- 
nals, perpetrators of domestic violence, addicts 
serial murderers and rapists. 

CJ 425— Drug Enforcement: Issues and 
Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Open to seniors only or 
by consent of instructor. 

A survey of historical and contemporary drug 
law enforcement in American society. Such top- 
ics as drug distribution, gangs, and governmenl 
drug-enforcement agencies, policies, and tech- 
niques will be examined. 

CJ 42&— International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: POS 1 1 3 or CJ 1 00, or consent 
of instructor. 

Investigation of the political, legal, and soci- 
ological aspects of international terrorism. Top- 
ics to be examined include the relationships ot 
international terrorism, international relations, 
and principles of international law, the nature of 
the anti-terrorist response, and the implications 
of international terrorism for the future. (Identical 
with POS 426.) 

CJ 440 — Seminar in Criminal Justice 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 390 or equivalent; open tc 
Seniors only or by consent of instructor. 

An intensive study of selected criminal justice 
topics. Students will have the opportunity to con- 
duct criminal justice research in approved areas 
of interest. 



GOVERNMENT 



111 



:j 447 — Comparative Judicial Systems 
5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Prerequisite. CJ 305 or CJ/POS 360 or POS 
115 or consent of the instructor. 

Focuses on the law enforcement and judicial 
Drocedure aspects of the Japanese, French, 
/Vest German, and Soviet political systems. 
Identical with POS 447). 

ZJ 450 — Field Experience I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to 
unior and senior criminal justice majors only and 
Dy invitation of the instructor. 

The purpose of this course is to broaden the 
educational experience of students through ap- 
propriate observation and work assignments 
with criminal justice agencies. The course will 
De organized around specific problem orienta- 
ions with operational research connotations. 
Students will be expected to spend a minimum 
Df five hours per week in the participating 
agency. Open to transient students only with 
Dermission of the school dean at Armstrong and 
M the college from which the student comes. 

:j 451— Field Experience II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to 
unior and senior criminal justice majors only and 
Dy invitation of the instructor. 

This is a sequential course to CJ 450 which 
m\\ permit the student to broaden further his 
oerspectives. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 
and of the college from which the student 
:omes. 

CJ 452-453-454— Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and 
cermission of the instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student 
with an opportunity to apply academic training 
n the practical governmental setting. Setting will 
include law enforcement agencies (local, stae, 
or federal), community treatment facilities, 
courts, congressional offices, and various gov- 
ernmental agencies. This course will be jointly 
supervised by departmental instructors and 
agency officials. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 
and of the college from which the student 
comes. (Identical with PA/POS 452-453-454.) 

CJ 490 — Directed Research in Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: CJ 390. 
A course designed to provide qualified stu- 



dents the opportunity to perform suitable and 
meaningful research into some area of criminal 
justice under the direction of the instructor. 
Open to transient students only with permission 
of the school dean at Armstrong and of the col- 
lege from which the student comes. 

Economics Offerings 

ECO 201 — Principles of Economics I 
(5-0-5) 

Offered Fall, Winter, and Summer. Prerequi- 
site: Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 

A survey of macro-economics, including 
basic economic concepts, national income, the 
monetary system, and the international econ- 
omy. 

ECO 202— Principles of Economics II 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, spring. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 
101 and MAT 101 ; ECO 201 not a prerequisite. 

A survey of micro-economics, including the 
composition and pricing of national output, gov- 
ernment and the market economy, factor pricing 
and income distribution, and a comparison of 
market systems. 

ECO 203— Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibilty for MAT 101. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles 
and practices of accounting; the construction 
and interpretation of balance sheet and profit 
and loss statements; the theory of debits and 
credits and their application to the accounting 
process. 

ECO 204 — Principles of Accounting II 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 203. 

The application of accounting principles to 
specialized problems found in proprietorships, 
partnerships, and corporations, with emphasis 
on cost accounting theory, modern methods of 
data processing, and the sources and appli- 
cations of funds 

ECO 320— International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Examines the economic importance and 
problems of international trade, exchange rates 
and monetary standards, tariffs and other trade 
barriers. Attention will be focused on fixed and 
floating exchange rates and their effects on 
trade balances of states Current debt problems 
of developing nations will be examined. (Iden- 
tical with POS 320) 



112 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ECO 330 — Economics of Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The study of governmental and corporate fi- 
nance, with emphasis en fiscal and monetary 
policy. Open-market operations, discount pol- 
icy, and the functions and problems associated 
with central banking will be examined and ana- 
lyzed. 

ECO 340— Economics of Labor (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202. 

An introductory general survey of labor eco- 
nomics and labor relations. Organization and 
operation of American trade unionism, collective 
bargaining, economics of the labor market, 
wage theory and income distribution also 
among topics studied. 

ECO 363— Economic History of the United 
States (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite:ECO 
201. 

This course surveys the growth and devel- 
opment of economic institutions in the United 
States from the colonial period to the present, 
with emphasis on the period since 1860. De- 
velopments in agriculture, industry, labor, trans- 
portation, and finance will be studied and 
analyzed. (Identical with HIS 363). 

ECO 445 — Comparative Economic Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic 
tenets of the major economic systems devel- 
oped in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of 
government and politics will be examined, along 
with the contributions to economic and political 
thought of such men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, 
John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with POS 445.) 

Political Science and Public Administration 
Offerings 

POS 113 — American Government (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility 
for ENG 101. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions 
of the national government in the United States, 
and some of the major problems of the state and 
local government. 

PA/POS 303 — Foundations of Public 
Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of in- 
structor. 



An introduction to the framework of public 
administration including such concepts and is- 
sues as bureaucracy, administrative power, in- 
formal groups, third party government, issue 
networks, budgeting, implementation, incre- 
mental decision making, personnel motivation, 
and the relationship of ethics and public service. 

POS 305 — State and Local Government 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of 
instructor. 

A comparative study of states, communities, 
and local governments, and their management 
of political conflict. Included is a study of fed- 
eralism, differences in governmental structures 
and functions, political culture, community 
power, tax and budget systems, and public pol- 
icy issues facing states and communities. 

POS 317— Constitutional Law and the 
Federal System (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of 
instructor. 

A case-study approach to the judicial inter- 
pretation of the Constitution, and the powers. of 
the federal government. Including: the nature 
and scope of judicial review, commerce power, 
separation of powers, power to tax and spend, 
state power to regulate, and economic due 
process. 

POS 318— Constitutional Civil Liberties 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission . of 
instructor. 

A case study approach to the judical inter- 
pretation of individual rights and the Constitu- 
tion. Including: nationalization of the Bill or 
Rights, criminal due process, freedom of 
expression, association, religion and privacy, 
and equal protection and due process. 

POS 320— International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 

Examines the economic importance and 
problems of international trade, exchange rates 
and monetary standards, tariffs and other trade 
barriers. Attention will be focused on fixed and 
floating exchange rates and their effects on 
trade balances of states. Current debt problems 
of developing nations will be examined. (Iden- 
tical with ECO 320.) 



GOVERNMENT 



113 



3 OS 321 — International Relations: The Far 
East (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

Contemporary international politics in the Far 
East are examined in terms of such broad his- 
orical trends as the decline of imperialism, the 
jevelopment of nationalism, and the rise of the 
J.S., U.S.S.R., People's Republic of China, and 
Japan as major powers in Asia. 

Some attention will be given to contemporary 
<ey issues such as the Sino-Soviet conflict, the 
uture of Formosa, U.S. -Japan Mutual Security 
Treaty revision, and U.S. -Japan economic in- 
eraction. 

POS 325 — International Organization. 
;5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, 
structures and functions of international organ- 
zations, with emphasis upon the role of these 
nstitutions in the maintenance of peace. 

POS 326— International Law (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public interna- 
tional law topics including: recognition, state 
succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, 
the law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the 
law of war. 

POS 329— International Relations (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and 
practices dominating contemporary interna- 
tional relations. 

POS 333— Contemporary Political Thought 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

Analysis of the important ideological currents 
of our time with selected indepth readings from 
original sources. 

POS 334— Political Philosophy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of 
instructor. 

Examination of the political ideas of leading 
political theorists, beginning with Socrates and 
extending to the end of the 19th Century. Se- 
lected primary source material will be read and 
analyzed. 



POS 345— Latin American Politics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of 
instructor. 

Examination of governments and political 
processes of selected nations in South America, 
Central America, and the Caribbean. Roles of 
state terrorism, revolutionary movements, and 
narcoterrorism are examined. 

POS 346— Governments of East Asia 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 13 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the contem- 
porary political institutions, processes, and 
ideas of the People's Republic of China, Japan, 
and Korea. Examines the development of these 
political systems with particular emphasis on 
historical, social, cultural, and contemporary-is- 
sue dimensions. 

POS 348 — Governments of Western Europe 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical and comparative study of the 
major Western European governments, with 
principal emphasis upon the analysis of the con- 
ditions which led to effective and stable parlia- 
mentary government and those which lead to 
the inefficiency, instability and breakdown of 
such systems. 

POS 349— Government of the Soviet Union 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
1 13 or permission of instructor. 

The primary purpose of this course is to focus 
on the study of contemporary Soviet politics 
along developmental scheme. Comparison of 
the pre-modern Tsarist autocratic regime and 
the contemporary Soviet totalitarian regime will 
be attempted. Also the course will cover such 
topics as Soviet political culture, political so- 
cialization process of the mass, governmental 
processes, and the public policy making/imple- 
mentation aspects. 

POS 360— Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 1 13 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal in- 
stitution. Sources and functions of both civil and 
criminal law, as well as operation of the legal 
process, are studied from the perspectives of 
jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. 
(Identical with CJ 360). 



114 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 400— Seminar in Political Science 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Admission will be subject 
to approval of the instructor. Offered on de- 
mand. Designed to permit superior students to 
pursue research and' reading in some field of 
political science under the supervision of the 
staff. 

PA/POS 401— Politics of the Budgetary 
Process (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the procedures, strat- 
egies and rationales involved in making public 
budgets at the local, state, and national levels. 
It is also concerned with critiques of the several 
types of budgets now in use together with an 
explanation of fiscal and monetary policies as 
they affect budgeting. Finally, it is concerned 
with the revenue systems in effect together with 
auditing and other controls exercised in the 
budgeting process. 

PA/POS 403— Public Policy Development 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
303 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a 
study of the theoretical aspects of decision-mak- 
ing theories (i.e., rational/comprehensive model 
vs. incremental model), political aspects of pol- 
icy-making process, mobilization of political 
support, and the cost/benefit aspects of the 
public policy-making. 

Some attempt will be made to apply the gen- 
eral theory of public policy-making to specific 
settings of welfare policy, urban problems, and 
national defense/foreign policy. 

POS 410— Independent Study in American 
Government (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A minimum 
of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours 
in Political Science at the 300-level or above. 
Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
sue individual research and reading in some 
field of political science under the supervision 
of a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on 
wide reading, conferences with the advisor and 
written reports and essays. Normally open only 
to students with a B average (3.0) in Political 
Science and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Appli- 
cations must be filed with the Department by 



mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent 
study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the school dean at Armstrong and the 
college from which the student comes. 

POS 411— American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: POS 
113 or permission of instructor. 

Offers an in-depth look at the office of the 
presidency, with the principal emphasis on the 
relations of the executive branch with the Con- 
gress and the court system. Some attention will 
be given to the evolution of the presidency to 
its present dominant position in the American 
political process. (Completion of a survey 
course in American History is desirable). 

POS 412— American Political Parties 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

Operation of political parties in the political 
system. Relationship between party organiza- 
tion, electoral system, and the recruitment anc; 
advancement of political leaders. 

POS 415 — American Supreme Court 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 o 
permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions o 
the Court, including examination of the role o] 
the Court as policy maker. 

PA/POS 418— Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: PO£ 
113 or permission of instructor. 

This course explores the framework of \av\ 
governing administrative agencies including 
administrative power and its control by th( 
courts, the determination and enforcement o 
administrative programs, discretion of admin 
istrative officials and their powers of summary 
actions, hearings before administrative boards 
and the respective spheres of administrative 
and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problerr 
of the maintenance of traditional procedure, 
safeguards in administrative law and the prob 
lem of civil rights and relation to administrative 
boards. Leading cases will be examined. 

POS 419— American Congress (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 o 
permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions o 
Congress, including a discussion of the theo 



GOVERNMENT 



115 



8tical framework for representative govern- 
ment, and Congress' role as policymaker. 

>OS 420— Independent Study in 
iternational Relations (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A minimum 
if 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours 
l Political Science at the 300-level or above, 
vdmission is by approval of a departmental 
ommittee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
ue individual research and reading in some 
eld of international relations under the super- 
ision of a member of the staff. Emphasis will 
>e on wide reading, conferences with the ad- 
isor and written reports and essays. Normally 
•pen only to students with a B average (3.0) in 
'olitical Science and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. 
applications must be filed with the Department 
>y mid-quarter preceding the quarter inde- 
iendent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
ion of the school dean at Armstrong and the 
ollege from which the student comes. 

♦OS 424 — Seminar on the Sino-Soviet 
'ower Rivalries (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

I Critical assessment of the early Sino-Soviet 
elations before and after the 1917 Bolshevik 

j devolution, followed by analysis of the roots of 
~ie Sino-Soviet conflicts in territorial, economic, 
trategic, political, and ideological perspec- 
ves. The implication of this schism for the con- 

iemporary global security relations will be 
:ntically examined. Heavy emphasis on re- 
■earch and oral presentation by the student. 

} OS 426— International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

, Prerequisites: POS 1 1 3 or CJ 1 00, or consent 
)f instructor. 

Investigation of the political, legal and soci- 
)logical aspects of international terrorism. Top- 
es to be examined include the relationships of 
nternational terrorism, international relations, 
ind principles of international law, the nature of 
he anti-terrorist response, and the implications 
)f international terrorism for the future. (Identical 
vith CJ 426.) 

3 OS 429 — American Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or 
permission of instructor. 

An analysis of U.S. foreign policy and factors, 
:>oth domestic and foreign, contributing to its 
ormulation. 



POS 430— Independent Study in Political 
Theory (V-V-(1 -5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A minimum 
of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours 
in Political Science at the 300-level or above. 
Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
sue individual research and reading in some 
field of political theory under the supervision of 
a member of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide 
reading, conferences with the advisor and writ- 
ten reports and essays. Normally open only to 
students with a B average (3.0) in Political Sci- 
ence and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications 
must be filed with the Department by mid- 
quarter preceding the quarter independent 
study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the school dean at Armstrong and the 
college from which the student comes. 

POS 440— Independent Study in 
Comparative Government (V-V-(1-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: A minimum 
of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours 
in Political Science at the 300-level or above. 
Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
sue individual research and reading in some 
field of comparative government under the su- 
pervision of a member of the staff. Emphasis will 
be on wide reading, conferences with the ad- 
visor and written reports and essays. Normally 
open only to students with a B average (3.0) in 
Political Science and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. 
Applications must be filed with the Department 
by mid-quarter preceding the quarter inde- 
pendent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permis- 
sion of the school dean at Armstrong and the 
college from which the student comes. 

POS 445 — Comparative Economic Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECO 
201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic 
tenets of the major economic systems devel- 
oped in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of 
government and politics will be examined, along 
with the contributions to economic and political 
thought of such men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, 
John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with ECO 445.) 



116 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 447 — Comparative Judicial Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. 

Prerequisite: CJ 305 or CJ/POS 360 or POS 
415 or consent of instructor. 

Designed to focus on the law enforcement 
and judicial procedure aspects of the Japanese, 
French, West German, and Soviet political sys- 
tems. (Identical with CJ 447.) 

PA/POS 452-453-454— Internship (V-V-5) 

Offered each quarter under each heading. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student 
with an opportunity to apply academic training 
in the practical governmental setting. Settings 
will include law enforcement agencies (local, 
state, or federal), community treatment facilities, 
courts, congressional offices, and various gov- 
ernmental agencies. This course will be jointly 
supervised by departmental instructors and 
agency officials. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the school dean at Armstrong 
and of the college from which the student 
comes. (Identical with CJ 452-453-454.) 



Graduate Program and 
Courses 

Coordinator: Dr. Dennis Murphy 



Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student will be 
assigned an advisor. The student should mee 
with the advisor as soon as possible after ad 
mission to establish an approved program o 
study. The student is responsible for his or he 
compliance with all program requirements. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students should note carefully the genera 
section on transfer of Graduate Credits ap 
pearing in the Academic Regulations of this Cat 
alog. The Criminal Justice Program will normalh 
accept two courses (10 quarter hours, 6 se 
mester hours) for transfer credit. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree MS in Criminal Justice require: 
the completion of 60 quarter hours of approvec 
coursework. The student will have the option c 
either writing a thesis or doing a field practicur 
as part of the program of study. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Each non-thesis candidate for the degre 
M.S. in Criminal Justice must pass a writte 
comprehensive examination. An oral examine 
tion may also be scheduled. For specific info 
mation on the written and oral comprehensiv 
examinations, students should contact their ac 
visor. 



General Information 

The Department of Government offers grad- 
uate courses and an M.S. program in Criminal 
Justice and graduate courses in political sci- 
ence and public administration studies appli- 
cable to graduate programs in other disciplines. 

Objectives of Criminal Justice Program 

The Department of Government offers a pro- 
gram of study leading to the degree Master of 
Science in Criminal justice. The objectives of the 
program are: 

1. To provide graduate-level education for 
professional criminal justice policy-makers 
and policy-makers in related fields in order 
to stimulate professionalization within the 
criminal justice system. 

2. To produce scholars prepared to meet the 
challenges of the future in research and 
teaching. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTEF 
OF SCIENCE (IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE) 

Houi 

A. Required Courses r c 

CJ 700, 701, 703, 705 and 716 

B. Required Options 

Either CJ 790 and 791, or CJ 
795 

C. Electives from the following I 

(Not more than two courses out- 
side of CJ. Dual-listed courses, 
e.g., POS 415 and POS 615, 
American Supreme Court, can 
be used as credit towards the 
degree only if the same courses 
were not taken at the under- 
graduate level). 

CJ 702, 704, 706, 709, 710, 712, 
721, 722, 723, or 724. 
PA/POS 601, 603, 618 or 704 
POS 615, 619, 626 or 705 __ 

TOTAL i 



GRADUATE GOVERNMENT 



117 



iminal Justice Offerings 

J 501 — Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

;(See CJ 301 for course description.) 

i J 560 — Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

(See CJ 360 for course description. Identical 
th POS 560.) 

I 610 — Criminality and Abnormal Behavior 
-0-5) 

(See CJ 410 for course description.) 

J 625 — Drug Enforcement: Issues and 
oblems (5-0-5) 

(See CJ 425 for course description.) 

I 626 — International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

(See CJ 426 for course description. Identical 
th POS 626.) 

J 647 — Comparative Judicial Systems 
-0-5) 

(See CJ 447 for course description. Identical 
th POS 647.) 

J 700 — Seminar in Justice Administration 
-0-5) 

An analysis of the criminal justice process 
)m prevention and arrest to release after in- 
irceration. The philosophies, practices, and 
ocedures of agencies responsible for the ad- 
mistraiton of justice are viewed and analyzed. 

J 701 — Advanced Research Methods in 
riminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Application of advanced research methods to 
oblems in the criminal justice system. 

J 702 — Criminal Justice Planning and 
novation (5-0-5) 

Introduction to planning techniques and their 
ipact on criminal justice program develop- 
ent Policy and decision-making procedures 
srtaming to affiliated agencies and organiza- 
Dns are analyzed. Planning involves identifi- 
ation of problem areas, diagnosing causation, 
>rmulating solutions, alternative strategies, and 
lobilizmg resources needed to effect change 

J 703 — Seminar in Crime Causation (5-0-5) 

Concentration with the individual offender is 
n the relationship of motives, attitudes, and 
billties to participate in criminal activity. With 
roups, consideration is given to peer influ- 
nces in the shaping and reinforcement of cnm- 
lal conduct. 



CJ 704 — Law and Social Control (5-0-5) 

Investigation of jurisprudential paradigms, so- 
cietal norms and sanctions, and the operational 
interaction among them. Topics to be examined 
include criminal and civil control mechanisms 
and purposes, historical and philosophical per- 
spectives on power, authority and law in society, 
and alternative means of social control. 

CJ 705 — Administration and Management 
for Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

New management and administrative require- 
ments of the criminal justice complex in transi- 
tion. Problems and innovative concepts of 
criminal justice system development, decision 
theory, information needs, planning and new 
managerial perspectives. 

CJ 706 — Juvenile Justice Administration 
(5-0-5) 

Assessment of the policies and practices of 
agencies involved in processing young persons 
through the juvenile court system. Attention will 
be paid to the intake procedures of the juvenile 
court; the adjudicational and dispositional pro- 
cedures of the juvenile court. 

CJ 709 — Police Problems and Practices 
(5-0-5) 

Major current issues of police administration 
including theory in policing, police productivity, 
and policy making. Special attention will be af- 
forded police-society relationships as they re- 
late to police misconduct, labor union issues, 
and minorities. 

CJ 710 — Institutional Incarceration and 
Treatment (5-0-5) 

Theory, purposes, and practices of correc- 
tional institutions. Problems in control and treat- 
ment will be explored. 

CJ 712 — Seminar in Community Treatment 
and Services (5-0-5) 

An analysis of probation and other alternatives 
to incarceration in the community setting, and 
of the feasibilty and effectiveness of treatment 
of individuals under sentence in the community 

CJ 716 — Criminal Process (5-0-5) 

Intensive examination of criminal adjudica- 
tion, from initial appearance through post-con- 
viction appeals and collateral attacks, as 
posited in the context of criminal justice policy 

CJ 721 — ADP Applications in Criminal 
Justice (5-0-5) 

An examination of the use of automated data 
processing by criminal justice agencies for ad- 



118 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ministrative and operational purposes. Special 
attention will be developed to microprocessor 
applications. 

CJ 722— Selected Topics in Law and Courts 
(5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems and issues regard- 
ing court management and the criminal judicial 
process will provide the basis for topic selection. 

CJ 723— Selected Topics in Policing (5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems and issues regard- 
ing the law enforcement and policing function 
will provide the basis for topic selection. 

CJ 724 — Selected Topics in Corrections 
(5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems and issues regard- 
ing correctional strategies and management will 
provide the basis for topic selection. 

CJ 790 & 791— Field Practicum (2-V-(1-5)) 

Planned program of research observation, 
study and work in selected criminal justice agen- 
cies. 

CJ 795— Thesis (0-V-(1-10)) 

Planned research and writing directed by the 
student's Thesis Committee. 



Political Science and Public Administration 
Offerings 

POS 505 — State and Local Government 
(5-0-5) 

(See POS 305 for course description.) 

POS 520— International Trade (5-0-5) 

(See POS 320 for course description. 
Identical with ECO 520.) 

POS 521— International Relations: The Far 
East (5-0-5) 

(See POS 321 for course description.) 

POS 533— Contemporary Political Thought 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. 

(See POS 333 for course description.) 

POS 545— Latin American Politics (5-0-5) 

(See POS 345 for course description.) 

POS 546 — Governments of East Asia 

(See POS 346 for course description.) 

POS 560— Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

(See POS 360 for course description. 
Identical with CJ 560.) 



POS 590— Research Methods (5-0-5) 

This course deals with the methods and tech 
niques of research in the behavioral sciences 
Emphasis will be placed on how to evaluate re 
search. 

PA/POS 601— The Politics of the Budgetary 
Process (5-0-5) 

(See PA/POS 401 for course description.) 

PA/POS 603— Public Policy Development 
(5-0-5) 

(See PA/POS 403 for course description.) 

POS 611— American Presidency (5-0-5) 

(See POS 411 for course description.) 

POS 612— American Political Parties (5-0-5) 

(See POS 412 for course description.) 

POS 615 — American Supreme Court (5-0-5) 

(See POS 415 for course description.) 

PA/POS 618— Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

(See PA/POS 418 for course description.) 

POS 619— American Congress (5-0-5) 

(See POS 419 for course description.) 

POS 624 — Seminar on the Sino-Soviet 
Power Rivalries (5-0-5) 

(See POS 424 for course description.) 

POS 626— International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

(See POS 426 for course description. Identics 
with CJ 626.) 

POS 629— American Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

(See POS 429 for course description.) 

POS 645— Comparative Economic Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
(See POS 445 for course description. IdentiCc 
with ECO 645.) 

POS 647— Comparative Judicial Systems 
(5-0-5) 

(See POS 447 for course description. IdentiCc 
with CJ 647.) 

PA/POS 704 — Topics in Public 
Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Designed to probe the chief concepts, thee 
ries, ideas, and models in Public Administratior 

POS 705 — Topics in State and Local 
Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

POS 710— Topics in American Government 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



HISTORY 



119 



OS 720 — Topics in International Relations 
i-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

A seminar course with specific titles an- 
Dunced as offered. May be repeated for credit 
s topics vary. 

OS 721 — Topics in Modern East Asia 
i-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Selected topics in nineteenth and twentieth 
sntury international, political, economic, social, 
tellectual, or contemporary developments in 
ast Asia. May be repeated as topics and in- 
ruc.tors vary. (Identical with HIS 721.) 

OS 730— Reading in Political Theory 
■-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

OS 790-791— Independent Study (V-V-5) 

Offered to qualified students subject to the 
llowing conditions. Prerequisites: A minimum 
25 graduate hours, including at ieast 1 5 hours 

Political Science graduate courses. An ap- 
ication may be obtained in the departmental 
flee and should be submitted to the depart- 
ed by the mid-term preceding the quarter in 
hich the independent study will begin. Open 

students with 3.5 GPA in Political Science 
'aduate courses and at least 3.3 overall GPA. 
dmission is by approval of a departmental 
Dmmittee. 



conomics Offerings 

CO 520— International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
(See ECO 320 for course description. 
Identical with POS 520.) 

CO 530 — Economics of Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
(See ECO 330 for course description.) 

CO 540— Economics of Labor (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
(See ECO 340 for course description.) 

CO 563— Economic History of the United 
tates (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
(See ECO 363 for course description.) 

CO 645 — Comparative Economic Systems 
i-0-5) 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
(See ECO 445 for course description Identi- 
al with POS 645.) 



History 

Faculty 

'Warlick, Roger, Department Head 
'Arens, Olavi 
'Babits. Lawrence 

Brown, Sarah 

Burnett, Robert 

Comaskey, Bernard 
'Duncan, John 
'Gross, Jimmie 

Lanier, Osmos 

Patterson, Robert 
'Pruden, George 
'Stone, Janet 
'Graduate Faculty 



The History Major 

The major in history may take either of two 
forms: History per se or History with T-4 Certi- 
fication. 

Students who major in history should expect 
to enroll in a foreign language sequence during 
their Sophomore year, certainly not later than 
their Junior year. Therefore, students should 
plan their programs of study with careful con- 
sultation with a Faculty Advisor. Students who 
change majors, or who transfer, may find it nec- 
essary to enroll beyond the traditional 12 quar- 
ters, if the degree requirements including the 
foreign language cannot be fulfilled within that 
time. 

Students enrolled in the evening program 
should not expect to be exempted from the for- 
eign language requirement, unless for a three- 
year period prior to graduation no available for- 
eign language sequence is offered in the eve- 
ning. 

In addition to meeting minimum requirements 
for either program, students contemplating 
graduate work in history are strongly advised to 
continue their linguistic study beyond the lan- 
guage sequence 1 03 level. Students with a dou- 
ble major, where Computer Science is a 
language choice, may substitute Computer Sci- 
ence for the foreign language requirement in 
history 

Advanced coursework in History for either 
form of the major requires HIS 300 and HIS 495 
or 496. In selecting the remainder of their ad- 
vanced courses students may choose to con- 
centrate m one particular area of History (e.g. 



120 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



European or American), providing they diversify 
to the extent of completing at least ten hours 
outside that area. 

Honors in History 

Honors in History will be awarded to those 
History majors with a 3.5 GPA in all History 
courses who submit an acceptable honors re- 
search paper to the department. The paper may, 
but does not have to be prepared in conjunction 
with a course that the student has taken. The 
paper should be the student's own work, based 
on research in primary sources, and be com- 
plete with end notes, bibliography and other crit- 
ical apparatus. It should be typewritten and 
follow Turabian's guide. The paper must be sub- 
mitted during the last quarter the student is in 
attendance before graduation and must be sub- 
mitted by mid-term of that quarter. The paper 
will be judged by a departmental jury of four 
faculty members who will by a majority vote de- 
termine if honors should be awarded. The 
awarding of honors will be noted on the stu- 
dent's transcript. 

Scholarships in History. 

Limited scholarship aid is available annually. 
Interested students are invited to inquire in the 
department office for details. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements* 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 
290 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; BIO 121, 122; CHE 121, 
122; PHY 121, 122; PHS 121, 

122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14or 191, 115or192,POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201; SOC201; PSY 101... 5 



ArealV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 

103 15 

2. History 251, 252, or 292 10 

3. Related course 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. HIS 300 and 495 or 496 10 

2. History courses 300 level or 
above with at least 1 hours out- 
side the area of concentration.. 30 
The concentration areas are: 

A. U.S. History— HIS 351, 352, 
354, 355, 357, 361 , 363, 365, 
371,374,375,376,377,379, 
400,403,416,417,421,422, 
451,470,471,485,486,496 

B. European History— HIS 333, 
336, 340, 341 , 342, 343, 344, 
345,346,347,348,350,410, 
411,445,447,483,484,495. 

C. Russian-Asian-African-Latin 
American History— HIS 310, 
312,320,321,322,323,329, 
330,428,431,435,481,482 

C. Courses in Related Fields 

To be chosen from such fields 
as anthropology, economics, lit- 
erature, sociology, statistics. 
See Department for exhaustive 
list ' 2 

D. Electives 3' 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 

TOTAL 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
HISTORY (with teacher certification) 

Hour i 

A. General Requirements 9 

Areal 2 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200, 201 

Area II % 

1. MAT 101, 220 1 [ 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 1! 



HISTORY 



121 



Area III 20 

1. HIS 114or 191. 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

ArealV 30 

1. HIS 251, 252, or 292 5 

2. Foreign language 101, 102, 

103 15 

3. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, SOC201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

Courses in the Major and Supporting 

Fields 60 

.1. HIS 300 and 495 or 496 10 

2. U.S. History 

A. HIS 371 or 377 (dependent 

on HIS 251, 252 selection).. 5 

B. One or two courses from: HIS 
351,352,354,355,361,363, 
365, 374, 375, 376, 379, 400, 
403,416,417,421,422,451, 
471, 485, 486, 496 5-10 

3. Russian-Asian-African-Latin 
American History 

Two courses from: HIS 310, 
312, 320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 
330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 10 

4. European History 

Two or three courses from: 
HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 
343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 
350,410,411,445,447,483, 
484, 495 10-15 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the 
following areas: 

A. Approved 300-400 level 
POS electives 

B. ECO 201 and approved 
300+ elective 

C. Approved electives in be- 
havioral sciences (SOC, 
ANT, PSY) 

D GEO 21 1,212 and approved 
GEO elective 
Professional sequence 40 

1. EDN 200, EXC 310, EDN 335, 
449, 481, 482, 483 35 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 5 

'- Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



Minor Concentrations 

The Department of History offers a number of 
minor concentrations. 

A minor in History has great practical value. 
Its notation on the transcript indicates to an em- 
ployer that the applicant has some solid liberal 
arts background with its accompanying insight 
into the development and functioning of modern 
society, and that the applicant has made an ex- 
tra effort to refine research and writing skills so 
essential to dealing with that society. Whatever 
the major one chooses, such a minor will 
strengthen the student's academic record. 

Students who hope to work in history-related 
fields upon graduation should consider adding 
a minor in Preservation Studies, or in Historical 
Archaeology. Through has program unique op- 
portunities are provided for qualified students to 
gain practical experience while making a real- 
istic assessment of the possibilities offered by 
their field of interest. Cooperative arrangements 
with Historic Savannah Foundation, Georgia 
Historical Society, Savannah Landmark Project, 
Oatland Island Center, and with a number of 
museums and historical sites, such as Telfair 
Academy, Ft. Pulaski, Juliette Low Center, and 
Ft. King George, permit placement of students 
in positions relating to: 

(a) archival and manuscript curation, (b) his- 
toric site administration and interpretation, (c) 
museum studies, (d) historic preservation, and 
(e) historical archaeology. 

Additional minor concentrations are offered 
jointly with the Department of Government in In- 
ternational Studies and Russian Studies. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better 
in each course, require the following: 

Hours 

History 20 

1 . Twenty hours of 300 + level HIS 

courses 20 

Historical Archaeology 25 

1 . MPS/ANT 401 , 402, and 422 

2. Ten hours from the following: 
HIS 300, 341 , 361 , 371 , and 403 

International Studies 25 

(assumes competency in one modern 
foreign language through the 103 level*) 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320. 346, 
348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 429; 
HIS 321. 330, 350, 355, 435 10 



122 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Preservation Studies 25 

1. HIS300 5 

2. MPS 412, 420 and 421 or 422 15 

3. MPS 401 or 498 5 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion 

of RUS 101-103*) 5 

2. POS349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 
428, 431, 435, 481; POS 440... 10 



Geography Offerings 

GEO 211— Physical Geography (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Course will include such topics as earth-sun 
relationships, cartography, weather, climate and 
climate classification, soils, bio-geography, veg- 
etation and landforms. Emphasis will be on 
global patterns of distribution. 

GEO 212— Cultural Geography (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Course will include such topics as the concept 
of culture, population settlement, patterns, tech- 
nological origins and diffusions, types of eco- 
nomics and the relationship of man to his 
environment. Emphasis will be given to the proc- 
ess of cultural change through time in place. 

GEO 302— Introduction to Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 plus 10 hours of a lab 
science. 

An introduction to physical and historical ge- 
ology. A study of the origin, evolution, and struc- 
ture of the earth's crust, and geologic history. 
(Identical with GEL 301). 

GEO 303 — Introduction to Meteorology 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 plus 10 hours of a lab 
science. 

An introduction to the description of the state 
of the atmosphere and to the physical laws that 
describe atmospheric phenomena. (Identical 
with MET 301). 

GEO 310 — Man and the Environment 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 or 212 plus 75 quarter 
hours credit in college courses. 

Considerations of the interactions between 
humans and the support systems of the earth 
which are essential to their existence (identical 
with BIO 310.) 



History Offerings 

Advanced courses in History are' generall 
open to all students who have completed th 
appropriate survey. Specifically, the Depan 
ment considers background equivalent to Hi: 
114 and HIS 115, or permission of the instructo 
to be the prerequisite for all advanced course 
on European, Russian, Asian, African, and Lati 
American topics. For advanced courses i 
American history, the equivalent of HIS 251 c 
HIS 252, or permission of the instructor, is cor 
sidered prerequisite. Exceptions are noted o 
specific courses. 

General 

HIS 114— Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibilit 
for college credit English, i.e. English 101 c 
above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, sc 
cial, religious, and intellectual activity from th 
time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civilization 
to 1715. Throughout the course the major civ 
lized traditions are considered and comparativ 
methods used to facilitate interpretations c 
them. 

HIS 115— Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibili 
for college credit English, i.e. English 101 
above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, s< 
cial, religious, and intellectual activity from 171 
to the present. Throughout the course the maj( 
civilized traditions are considered and compa 
ative methods used to facilitate interpretatior 
of them. A continuation of HIS 114. 

HIS 191— Honors Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: B's or better in High School Hi: 
tory and an SAT verbal score of at least 550. 

This course replaces HIS 1 1 4 for selected sti 
dents. While the subject matter will be the sarr, 
as for HIS 1 1 4, the treatment of it will vary greats 
Likewise, instruction will go beyond the usu 
lecture method, allowing students to read wide, 
and carry out their own research under the c 
rection of the professor. 

HIS 192— Honors Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 191 or a grade of "A" in HI 1 
114. 

This course replaces HIS 1 1 5 for selected sti! 
dents. While the subject matter will be the sard 
as for HIS 1 1 5, the treatment of it will vary greatl 
Likewise, instruction will go beyond the usu' 



HISTORY 



123 



;ture method, allowing students to read widely 
d carry out their own research under the di- 
ction of the professor. 

3 300— Historical Method (3-4-5) 
-all and Spring (evening). Required of all His- 
y majors and of Preservation Studies minors, 
^n introduction to the nature and method of 
torical research, treating problems of mves- 
ation, organization, and writing through dis- 
ssion and actual research experience in local 
tory. 

5 395— Internship (V-V-(1-5)) 

}pen to transient students only with permis- 
n of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 
college from which the student comes. Pre- 
juisites: 3.0 in all history courses; 20 hours of 
Der level history including HIS 300. 
application and credit arrangements must be 
de through the department in advance, nor- 
lly by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of 
jrnship. 

he student will pursue an individually de- 
ned course project involving off-campus 
dy and research in a government or private 
?ncy. Projects are normally designed to re- 
re the full eleven week quarter for completion, 
ing which time the student will be under the 
t supervision of the sponsoring agency and 
faculty advisor. May be repeated for credit, 
his internship, graded on an S or U basis, 
be credited among electives, not as a part 
he minimum 40 hours of traditional work re- 
red for the major. 

i 399— Fieldwork in History 
tf-[1-5]) Summer, 1989. 
j )ffered only by special arrangement with the 
!: wtment, made in advance, this course is 
Signed to provide credit for field-trip based 
I irses or extended site visits, whether abroad 
:] n the U.S. Research, reading, and written 
i| ignments will be tailored to the specific na- 
\ of each study tour or site visitation. (Specific 
a of study will be indicated on the transcript.) 
• course may be repeated for credit as topics 
/, but no more than five hours may be 
mted among the 40 hours required for a ma- 
n History. 



I ed States History Offerings 

II 251— American History to 1865 
1-5) 

lered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility 
) NG 101. 



A survey of the political, economic, and social 
history of the United States to end of the Civil 
War. 

HIS 252— American Since 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility 
for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social 
history of the United States from 1865 to the 
present. 

HIS 292 — Honors American History 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Completion of HIS 115 or HIS 
192 with a grade of A, or recommendation by 
the professor 

Organized on a thematic or problematic basis 
so as to encompass the scope of American his- 
tory. Students will be expected to read more 
extensively and write more critically than for HIS 
251 or 252. This course meets the requirement 
in American history set by the State of Georgia 
For History majors, this course satisfies 5 hours 
of the American history survey requirement (HIS 
251 and 252): 5 additional hours of advanced 
American history are required to complete it. 

HIS 351— Popular Culture in the United 
States to 1914(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1990. 

An examination of the major trends in the news 
media, popular literature, entertainment, and 
recreational activities to 1914. 

HIS 352— Popular Culture in the United 
States Since 1914(5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

An examination of the major trends in news 
media, popular literature, entertainment, and 
recreational activities since 1914. 

HIS 354 — Studies in American Diplomacy to 
WW I (5-0-5) 

Fall. 1990 

Considers American objectives and policies 
in foreign affairs from colonial times to World 
War I. 

HIS 355 — Studies in American Diplomacy 
since WW I (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

Considers American objectives and policies 
in foreign affairs from World War I to the present 

HIS 357 — American Military History 
(5-0-5) 

Spring Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
A study of the history of warfare and military 
technique in their social, economic, and political 



124 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



contexts, with special emphasis on the Ameri- 
can military tradition. 

HIS 361— The Old South (5-0-5) 

Economic, cultural, and political history of the 
antebellum South with emphasis on those fac- 
tors that made the South a unique section of the 
nation. 

HIS 363 — Economic History of the United 
States (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and devel- 
opment of economic institutions in the United 
States from the colonial period to the present, 
with emphasis on the period since 1860. De- 
velopments in agriculture, industry, labor, trans- 
portation, and finance will be studied and 
analyzed. (Identical with ECO 363.) 

HIS 365 — The American Indian (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A study of the history and cultures of the ab- 
origines of the Americas. 

HIS 371 — Colonial and Revolutionary 
America (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World 
and the settlement and growth of the English 
colonies of North America; triumph over France 
in the New World, the drastic change in British 
colonial policy and the rise of American oppo- 
sition to it, the achievement of independence, 
and the establishment of the United States under 
the Constitution. 

HIS 374 — Women in American History 
(5-0-5) 

Women in American History: An examination 
of the changing political, social and economic 
roles of the American woman from colonial times 
to the present. Emphasis will be given to the 
pre-Civil War feminist reform movements, wom- 
an's broader social and economic role after the 
war, her awakening awareness of the need for 
political power, and the mid-20th century revo- 
lution. 

HIS 375 — Civil War and Reconstruction 
(5-0-5) 

The causes and significance of the American 
Civil War, with minor consideration of the military 
campaign; political, economic and social as- 
pects of reconstruction. 

HIS 376— Victorian America (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

Presentation of the major subjects of the late 
19th century, including the emergence of a na- 



tional econorhy, its theory and policies; partis 
and reform politics; the moral and Constitutioi 
dimensions of Reconstruction; American soci( 
and social thought; and territorial aggrandis 
ment. 

HIS 377— Recent America (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

An analysis of the institutions and forces whii 
molded American life from the late 19th centi 
(1890) through World War II, including politic 
economic, social and intellectual issues. 

HIS 379— Contemporary America (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

An examination of the society of the Uniti 
States since World War II, with special empha; 
given to the major social and cultural trends. 

HIS 400 — Seminar in American History 
(5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for adm 
sion. 

Designed to permit a group of advanced si 
dents to pursue intensive research on a spec 
topic in the field to be defined by the instruct 

HIS 403— American Material Cultural 
(4-2-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

An introduction to the study of the non-liter; 
remains of our society, past and present. V 
nacular and polite architecture, ceramics, rr 
tuary art, community and settlement patter 
dress, diet, and diseases are among the top 
that will be discussed. (Jdentical with AC A\ 
MPS 403 and ANT 403). 

HIS 421— Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

A study of various styles of American ar<: 
tecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, Eel 
ticism and modern; slides from Histc 
American Building Survey; landscape archit 
ture Visiting speakers and field trips will 
used. 

HIS 422— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. Prerequisite: MPS 207, or pern 
sion of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of N< 
America since the arrival of European mai 
the New World Some attention will be pai<] 
British and Continental Post medieval Arch 
ology as well as to the special areas of mdu< 
and Nautical Archaeology. Special stress wil] 
given to archaeological method and theory rj 
as perspective for the writing of history and 
a component of Historic Preservation. (Iden 
with MPS 422.) 



HISTORY 



125 



iilS 451 — Reform Movements in American 
History (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 
| A study of the reform movements in America 
ince the Revolution. 

IIS 470— History of Savannah (5-0-5) 

! Winter, 1991. 

! Begins with a history of local Indians, empha- 
jis on the founding of the colony at Savannah 
jnd on the colonial, Revolutionary, antebellum 
jnd Post-Civil War periods. Political, economic, 
jocial, religious and artistic trends are dis- 

ussed and placed in context of Georgia and 
|I.S. history. 
The course will involve considerable research 

i primary sources available locally. 

IIS 471 — Seminar in Georgia and Local 
listory (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. Prerequisite: HIS 470 or permission 
f the instructor. 

An exposition of the principles and techniques 
f local history followed by an intensive inves- 
gation of selected aspects of the history of Sa- 
annah and Georgia using primary sources and 
ulminating in a research paper. 

IS 485-486— Independent Study in United 
tates History (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 300 
nd at least 1 5 additional hours in upper division 
istory courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), 
n overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 120 
ours), and an approved application. Open to 
ansient students only with the permission of the 
•ean of Faculty of Armstrong and the college 
om which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
je individual research and reading in the cho- 
sn field under the supervision of a member of 
ie History faculty. An application must be filed 
'ith the department, in advance, normally by 
lid-quarter preceding the independent study. 

full description of the requirements and an 
pplication may be obtained in the departmental 
rfice 

IIS 496 — American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990 (evening). 

See major program outlines, part B.1, for the 
^tonography requirement. 
, A study of the writing of American history from 
jolonial times to the present with emphasis on 
ie historical philosophies and interpretations of 
ie major schools of thoughts as well as indi- 



vidual historians. Recommended especially to 
students contemplating graduate work in His- 
tory. 

European History Offerings 

HIS 333— Modern Germany, 1789-1933 
(5-0-5) 

A study of Germany from the pluralism of the 
Holy Roman Empire through the German con- 
federation to the unified Reich. Attention will be 
given to the political, social, and cultural devel- 
opments in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third Ger- 
many." 

HIS 336— Modern East Central Europe 
(5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

A survey of the history of the nations between 
Germany and Russia in the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies. Topics to be covered include the rise of 
nationalism, the gaining of independence, prob- 
lems in establishing democracy, experience 
during World War II, and the establishment of 
communist control. 

HIS 340— English History, 1485-1660 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

An analysis of political, constitutional, eco- 
nomic, and religious issues under the tudors and 
early Stuarts, including the English Civil War. 

HIS 341— English History, 1660-1815 
(5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

An investigation of the Restoration monar- 
chies, the constitutional revolution of 1688, the 
rise of ministerial responsibility in the early 18th 
century, the American colonial revolt, and Eng- 
land's relationship to the French Revolution. 

HIS 342— Ancient History (5-0-5) 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle 
East, the Greek city states, the Roman republic 
and empire, with special emphasis on the social, 
political and cultural contributions of these an- 
cient peoples. 

HIS 343— Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333- 
c.1 000 (5-0-5) 

Fall. 1990. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Ro- 
man Empire through the Carolingian period with 
special emphasis on the institutional develop- 
ments which led to the emergence of stable 
kingdoms out of the chaos of the barbarian in- 
vasions. 



126 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 344— The High Middle Ages, C.1000 to 
c.1 300 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

The history of Europe from c. 1000 to 1300 
with emphasis on the struggle between church 
and state, the Crusade movement, and the 12th 
century intellectual renaissance, all of which 
profoundly influenced the development of the 
various medieval kingdoms. 

HIS 345— The Late Middle Ages and 
Renaissance (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

The history of Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 
with emphasis on the political, cultural, and in- 
tellectual developments which transformed me- 
dieval and Renaissance society. 

HIS 346— Reformation Era (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A study of the controversial era emphasizing 
its major issues and movements, and their de- 
velopment through the Thirty Years War. Politi- 
cal, social, and economic, as well as religious 
facets of the upheaval will be considered. 

HIS 347— Europe in the Eighteenth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1990. 

This course covers the period from the reign 
of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, consid- 
ering the major political, social, and intellectual 
trends on the Continent. Particular emphasis is 
placed on France. 

HIS 348 — Europe in the Nineteenth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A study of the most important social, political, 
and intellectual directions of European history 
from the Congress of Vienna to the end of the 
nineteenth century. 

HIS 350— Europe in the Twentieth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

A study of the major developments in Europe 
since 1900. 

HIS 410— Seminar in European History 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Permission of instructor required for admis- 
sion. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in 
European history by examination of primary ma- 
terials. 



HIS 411 — Seminar on the Crusades 
(5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

An examination of the 12th and 13th centur 
Crusade movement through the study of thi 
available primary source material. 

HIS 445 — Topics in Medieval History 
(5-0-5) 

Summer, 1990. 

A treatment of selected topics in medieval his 
tory working from primary source materials. Ma 
be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIS 447 — The French Revolution and 
Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

This course examines the background anc 
events of the French Revolution and the caree 
of Napoleon. Different interpretations are con 
sidered. 

HIS 483-484 — Independent Study in 
European History (V-V-(1-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS30( 
and at least 1 5 additional hours in upper divisior 
History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0) 
an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 12( 
hours), and an approved application. Open t( 
transient students only with the permission of th« 
Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the colleg- 
from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pu: 
sue .individual research and reading in the chc 
sen field under the supervision of a member c 
the History faculty. An application must be ffflfl 
with the department, in advance, normally b 
mid-quarter preceding the independent study 
A full description of the requirements and a 
application may be obtained in the department; 
office. 

HIS 495 — European Historiography 
(5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991 (evening). See major prograi 
outlines, part B.1 , for the historiography require 
ment. 

A study of the writers of history in the Wester 
cultural tradition, with an emphasis on the hi! 1 
torical philosophies, interpretations, and prot 
lems raised by the major modern Europes 
historians. Recommended especially to sti 
dents contemplating graduate work in History 



HISTORY 



127 



jsian, Asian, African and Latin American 
tory Offerings 

i 310 — Latin America (5-0-5) 

,n introductory course in Latin-American his- 
- with consideration given to institutions of the 
as as well as events and personalities. 

312— History of Africa (5-0-5) 

, survey of African civilizations from ancient 
3S, with major emphasis on development of 
continent since 1800. 

320— Traditional China (5-0-5) 

all, 1990. 

he history of Chinese civilization from ancient 
5S to the early nineteenth century, with em- 
isis on its characteristic political, social, eco- 
nic, and cultural developments. 

i 321— Modern China (5-0-5) 

pring, 1991. 

he history of China from the nineteenth cen- 
to the present, with emphasis on political, 
ial. economic, and intellectual develop- 
its 

322— History of Japan (5-0-5) 

all, 1989. 

survey of the history of Japan from the ear- 
times to the present, with primary emphasis 
ts emergence as a world power since the 
nineteenth century. 

323— History of the Middle East 
-5) 

Dring, 1990. 

survey of Middle Eastern history from Mu- 
imad to the present, and of Islamic culture 
civilization. Emphasis will be placed on the 
kground of current issues and conflicts in 
region. 

I 329— Medieval Russia (5-0-5) 

all. 1989. 

, survey of the economic, social, and political 
«i9lopment of the Russian state from its foun- 
lon in the 9th century through its moderni- 
cpn by Peter the Great in the early 18th 
«i ury. 

Ii 330— Modern Russia (5-0-5) 

'ill. -1990. 

survey of Russian history from Peter the 

^at to the present. The major political, cultural, 

c lomic, and social developments of Russia 

Ibth the Imperial and Soviet periods will be 

?red 



HIS 428— Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A detailed study of the impact of Western in- 
fluence on the Muscovite state in the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. 

HIS 431— The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary 
tradition, the causes for the collapse of Tsarism, 
the Bolshevik Revolution, and victory in the Rus- 
sian Civil War. 

HIS 435 — History of Soviet Foreign Policy 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

This course reviews historically the develop- 
ment of soviet foreign policy toward Western Eu- 
ropean states, notably Germany, and also with 
the non-European world through 1917-1940, 
World War II, and cold War phases. Special at- 
tention will be given in this last phase to U.S.- 
Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with other com- 
munist states in Eastern Europe, China, and the 
Third World, and to the recent moves toward 
detente. 

HIS 481-482— Independent Study in 
Russian/Asian/African/Latin-American 
History (V-V-(1-5)). 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 300 
and at least 1 5 additional hours in upper division 
History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), 
an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 120 
hours), and an approved application. Open to 
transient students only with the permission of the 
Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes 

Designed to permit superior students to pur- 
sue individual research and reading in the cho- 
sen field under the supervision of a member of 
the History faculty. An application must be filed 
with the department, in advance, normally by 
mid-quarter preceding the independent study. 
A full description of the requirements and an 
application may be obtained in the departmental 
office. 



128 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Museum and Preservation Studies 
Offerings 

MPS 207— Introduction to Archaeology 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. 

The introductory archaeology course consists 
of a history of the field, basic techniques, the- 
oretical underpinnings, and examples of field 
work from all types of excavation. It covers the 
range from early man to industrial and urban 
archeology in a general fashion. Analysis is in- 
troduced along with survey techniques, pres- 
ervation reporting and other skills. (Identical with 
ANT 207.) 

MPS 401— Fieldwork in Historical 
Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Summer. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permission 
of instructor or director. 

An introduction to and first application of ar- 
chaeological methods to a specific field project. 
Excavation techniques, surveying and map 
making, data collecting and recording, archae- 
ological photography, the identification and 
analysis of art facts, and the interpretation or 
archaeological data will be presented in field 
and laboratory work as well as in lectures and 
readings. (Identical with ANT 401). (Under cer- 
tain circumstances this course may be substi- 
tuted in the Preservation Studies minor for MPS 
498). Course may be repeated for credit. 

MPS 402— Practicum in Archaeological 
Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall, 1990. Prerequisite: permission of instruc- 
tor. 

The application of archaeological interpreta- 
tive techniques to a specific site or analytical 
problem. Individual research projects in the 
interpretation of archaeological data and the 
conservation of artifactual finds with special at- 
tention to the care and storage of collections, 
display in the museum setting, and the pres- 
entation of archaeologically-derived informa- 
tion. (Identical with ANT 402). (Under certain 
circumstances this course may be substituted 
in the Museum Studies minor for MPS 495). 

MPS 403— American Material Culture 
(4-2-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary 
remains of our society, past and present. Ver- 
nacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mor- 
tuary art, community and settlement patterns, 



dress, diet, and disease are among the top 
that will be discussed. (Identical to HIS 403 a 
ANT 403). 

MPS 410— Curatorship (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HIS 300 or permission of instri 
tor. 

Deals with the historical background and p 
pose of curatorship, conservation, restorat 
technology, research including authenticate 
cataloging and organizing collections. 

MPS 420— An Introduction to Historic 
Preservation (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

Students may find HIS 300 to be useful pr< 
aration for this course. 

A survey of the field including values, prir 
pies, practices, development of planning a 
organization for preservation; preservation l< 
economics and politics. 

MPS 421— Architectual History (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

A study of various styles of American arc 
tecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, Eel' 
ticism and modern; slides from Histo 
American Building Survey; landscape archit 
ture. Visiting speakers and field trips will 
used. 

MPS 422— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or pen- 
sion of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of N< 
America since the arrival of European mai 
the New World. Some attention will be paid 
British and Continental Post Medieval ArcH 
ology as well as to the special areas of indus | 
and Nautical Archaeology. Special stress wilj 
given to archaeological method and theory t, 
as a perspective for the writing of history j 
as a component of Historic Preservation, (id 
tical with HIS 422). 

MPS 430— Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MPS 420. 

A study of organizational techniques and 
icy, public relations and marketing, mem 
ship, budgeting, personnel relations, seci 
insurance, and such other topics as are p 
nent. 

MPS 480— Special Topics in Archaeology 
(V-V-[1-5]) 

Prerequisites: ANT/MPS 207, ANT/MPS ' 

The course is designed to offer a wide va 

of experience to advanced, upper level stud 



GRADUATE HISTORY 



129 



archaeological techniques. Subject matter will 
jnter on such topics as archaeological graph- 
s, faunal analysis (zooarchaeology), conser- 
ition, or involve some off-campus 
chaeological experience. 

PS 495 — Internship in Museum Studies 
-V-5) 

Prerequisites: MPS 420, 411, and 412 with a 
)" or better in each course. 
The student will pursue an individually de- 
nned course project involving off-campus 
jdy and research in a government or private 
lency involved in museum work. Projects are 
rmally designed to require the full eleven 
jek. quarter to completion, during which time 
3 student will be under the joint supervision of 
3 sponsoring agency and his faculty sponsor. 

3 S 498— Internship in Preservation 
udies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: MPS 412, 420, 421 with a "C" 
better in each course. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
jned course project involving off-campus 
idy and research in an appropriate preser- 
tion agency. Projects are normally designed 
require the full eleven week quarter for com- 
mon, during which time the student will be 
cler the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
ency and his faculty sponsor. 



raduate Program and 
ourses 

ordmator: Dr. Olavi Arens 



Ed. 

: or details regarding the M.Ed, and Ed.S. pro- 
ams, please refer to the Department of Sec- 
tary Education portion of the Catalog. 

A. in History 

r he Master of Arts in History degree program 
iy be pursued in three areas of concentration. 

Historic Preservation 

American History 

European History 

jectives 

I "he program offers students an opportunity 
achieve a graduate liberal arts degree that 
h support a broad range of personal, profes- 



sional, and educational objectives. Obtaining an 
M.A. in History can lead to employment oppor- 
tunities for students as archivists, local history 
society directors, historic site directors, local 
museum directors, and professionals in the field 
of cultural resource preservation. The research 
skills, experience in analytical thinking, and abil- 
ity to express oneself orally and in writing will 
be of benefit to a student in seeking employment 
in governmental and military service and teach- 
ing at private schools, as well as preparing a 
student for further graduate study. The M.A. de- 
gree may also lead to job advancement or more 
effective performance, as well as to great per- 
sonal satisfaction and intellectual enrichment. 

Advisement 

On admission to graduate studies students 
should take immediate steps to contact the 
Graduate Coordinator in the Department of His- 
tory. At this time the student's status with respect 
to language requirements prerequisite course- 
work, any transfer credits, etc., can be clarified. 
Also, an advisor will be assigned so that actual 
planning of the program of study can begin. 

Transfer of Credits 

Students may transfer coursework from an- 
other accredited institution providing (1) no 
more than 5 hours be applied toward either the 
concentration field or to "history outside the con- 
centration," and (2) that the work offered for 
transfer be deemed appropriate to the program 
of study by the Department. Under no circum- 
stances may credit transferred exceed 1 5 hours. 

Language Requirements 

The language requirement must be met by 
satisfactorily passing the reading comprehen- 
sion section of an appropriate national stand- 
ardized test administered by the ASC 
Department of Languages, Literature, and Dra- 
matic Arts in one of the following: French, Ger- 
man, Latin, Russian, or Spanish. This is 
equivalent to passing the appropriate 103-level 
language course. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Satisfactorily performance on both written and 
oral comprehensive exams is required of all can- 
didates for the M.A. in History. As coursework 
nears completion specific details on the exams 
should be worked out in coordination with the 
faculty advisor and the Graduate Coordinator 



130 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Thesis/Internship Requirement 

All three concentration fields require either a 
thesis or an internship. Topics and other ar- 
rangements for these projects must be planned 
in consultation between the student, the faculty 
advisor, and the Graduate Coordinator. 



*N.B. Students who cannot schedule the ap 
propriate historiography course will satisfy thi 
requirement by means of a reading list and ai 
examination with a grade of B or better. No cred 
toward the degree is awarded for this exam 
nation. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

Hours 

A. Concentration in American or in Eu- 
ropean History: 

Prerequisite: History 500 (ASC) or un- 
dergraduate history methodology 
course. 

1 . In field of concentration (Amer- 
ican or European) including 
historiography: 25 

2. History outside concentration... 15 

3. Electives in history or approved 
related field courses 10 

4. Thesis 10 

TOTAL 60 

B. The concentration in Historic Preser- 
vation involves several prerequisites: 
HIS 300 (ASC) or undergraduate his- 
tory methodology course, MPS 420 
(ASC) or an introductory course in 
preservation and MPS 207 (ASC) or 
introductory course in archaeology. 

1. In Historic Preservation 

concentration 25 

MPS 621 (American Architec- 
tural History) 

MPS 603 (American Material 
Culture) 

MPS 622 (Historical Archaeol- 
ogy) or 

MPS 602 (Practicum in Ar- 
chaeological Analysis) 
MPS 630 (Administration) 
MPS 725 (Preservation Plan- 
ning) 

2. Approved history courses (to in- 
clude History 670 or History 

671) 25 

3. Internship (MPS 701 -702 an op- 
tion) and a research paper or 
Thesis 10 

TOTAL 60 

N.B. courses taken at the undergraduate level 

may not be repeated for graduate credit. At least 

50% of the credit towawrd the M.A. must be 

taken at the 700-level or above. 



OFFERINGS 

In addition to any specifically noted cours 
prerequisites, there is the general requiremer 
that students must have 35 hours of undergrac 
uate work in history to qualify for regular admis 
sion to the M.A. program, or 25 hours to qualif 
for provisional admission. 



General History Offerings 

HIS 500— Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Fall and Spring (evening). 

Required of all students pursuing an M.A. i 
history unless an equivalent course has bee 
taken previously. 

(See HIS 300 for course description.) 

HIS 791— Independent Study (V-V-5) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: at leai 
15 graduate hours in History, graduate GPA 
3.5 and approval by a departmental committe« 
Designed to permit students to pursue individu 
research and a paper in the chosen field und<| 
the supervision of a member of the history fa 
ulty. 

An application may be obtained in the d 
partmental office and should be submitted, wi 
the signature of the faculty member who will s 
pervise the independent study, during preregi 
tration period the quarter before tr 
independent study will be taken. Only one i 
dependent study may be credited toward tr 
history concentration requirement. 

HIS 792— Directed Readings in History 
(V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: 15 hours of graduate histor 
graduate GPA of 3.5, and approval by a d 
partmental committee. 

A student whose program of study shows 
need for an additional graduate course in H 
tory that cannot be met by the projected sche 
ule of courses may petition the Gradua 
Committee to register for a course in Direct) 
Readings, under the supervision of a consents 
faculty member. A plan for reading and asses 
ment must be submitted to the Graduate Co 



GRADUATE HISTORY 



131 



nittee for approval. A student may register for 
his course only once. 

i\S 800-801— Thesis (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the 
:omprehensive examinations. 

Planned research and writing directed by the 
tudent's thesis advisor. Normally, a student will 
agister for 5 hours credit per quarter, using one 
uarter for research and one quarter for writing. 



nited States History Offerings 

IS 554 — Studies in American Diplomacy to 
Ml (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1990. 

Prerequisite: HIS 251 or equivalent. 

(See HIS 354 for course description.) 

IS 555 — Studies in American Diplomacy 
ince WW I (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

(See HIS 355 for course description.) 

IS 557— American Military History (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

A study of the history of warfare and military 

cheque in their social, economic, and political 

)ntexts, with special emphasis on the Ameri- 

an military tradition. 

IS 576 — Victorian American (5-0-5) 

, Winter, 1991 

| (See HIS 376 for course description.) 

IS 621— American Architectural History 
? -2-5) 

• Spring, 1991. 

4 (See HIS 421 for course description.) 

IS 651— Reform Movements in American 
, istory (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

(See HIS 451 for course description.) 

IS 670 — Topics in Savannah History 
-0-5) 

[ Winter, 1991. 
(See HIS 470 for course description.) 

IS 671— Seminar in Georgia and Local 
istory (5-0-5) 

I Fall, 1989. Prerequisites: HIS 470, 670, or per- 

lission of the instructor. 

! (See HIS 471 for course description.) 



HIS 696— American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990 (evening). 

See program outline, Part A.1, for the histo- 
riography requirement. 

(See HIS 496 for course description.) 

Students who cannot schedule the appropri- 
ate historiography course will satisfy this re- 
quirement by means of a reading list and an 
examination with a grade of B or better. No credit 
toward the degree is awarded for this exami- 
nation. 

HIS 770— Topics in U.S. History (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

Topics and instructors vary over an approxi- 
mate four-year cycle; hence the course may be 
repeated for credit. Information about the spe- 
cific topic and instructor for a given quarter is 
available in the departmental office. A complete 
list of topics that have been taught is also avail- 
able on request. 



European History Offerings 

HIS 536— Modern East Central Europe 
(5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

(See HIS 336 for course description.) 

HIS 540— English History, 1495-1660 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

(See HIS 340 for course description.) 

HIS 541— English History, 1660-1815 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

(See HIS 341 for course description.) 

HIS 546— The Reformation Era (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

(See HIS 346 for course description.) 

HIS 547 — Europe in the Eighteenth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1990 

(See HIS 347 for course description.) 

HIS 548 — Europe in the Nineteenth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. 1990. 

(See HIS 348 for course description.) 

HIS 550 — Europe in the Twentieth Century 
(5-0-5) 

Spring 1990 

(See HIS 350 for course description.) 

HIS 611— Seminar on the Crusades (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1990 

(See HIS 41 1 for course description ) 



132 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 628— Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1990. 

A detailed study of the impact of Western in- 
fluence on the Muscovite state in the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. 

HIS 631— The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

An examination of the Russian revolutionary 
tradition, the causes for the collapse of Tsarism, 
the Bolshevik Revolution, and victory in the Rus- 
sian Civil War. 

HIS 635 — History of Soviet Foreign Policy 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

This course reviews historically the develop- 
ment of Soviet foreign policy toward Western 
Europe states, notably German, and also with 
the non-European world through 1917-1940. 
World War II, and Cold War phases. Special 
attention will be given in the last phase to U.S.- 
Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with other com- 
munist states in Eastern Europe, China, and the 
Third World, and to the recent moves toward 
detente. 

HIS 645— Topics in Medieval History (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1990. 

(See HIS 445 for course description.) 

HIS 647— The French Revolution and 
Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991. 

(See HIS 447 for course description.) 

HIS 695 — European Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1991 (evening). 

See program outline, part A.1, for the histo- 
riography requirement. 

(See HIS 495 for course description.) 

Students who cannot schedule the appropri- 
ate historiography course will satisfy this re- 
quirement by means of a reading list and an 
examination with a grade of B or better. No credit 
toward the degree is awarded for this exami- 
nation. 

HIS 760 — Topics in European History (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989; Spring, 1990. 

Topics and instructors vary over an approxi- 
mate four-year cycle; hence the course may be 
repeated for credit. Information about the spe- 
cific topic and instructor for a given quarter is 
available in the departmental office. A complete 
list of topics that have been taught is also avail- 
able on request. 



Non-Western History Offerings* 

HIS 510— Latin America (5-0-5) 

(See HIS 310 for course description.) 

HIS 512— Topics in African History (5-0-5) 

(See HIS 312 for course description.) 

HIS 521— Modern China (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

(See HIS 321 for course description.) 

HIS 721— Topics in Modern East Asia 
(5-0-5) 

Summer, 1989. Prerequisite: Permission of ir 
structor. 

Selected topics in the nineteenth and twer 
tieth century international, political, economic 
social, intellectual, or contemporary develop 
ments in East Asia. May be repeated as topic 
and instructors vary. (Identical with POS 721 1 

*ln the M.Ed, program, courses in Russia 
history are also considered to be non-Westerr 



Museum and Preservation Studies 
Offerings 

MPS 601— Fieldwork in Historical 
Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Summer. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permissio 
of instructor or director. 
(See MPS 401 for course description.) 

MPS 602 — Practicum in Archaeological 
Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall, 1990. Prerequisite: permission of instru< 
tor or director. 
(See MPS 402 for course description.) 

MPS 603— American Material Culture (4~2-£ 

Winter, 1990. 

(See MPS 403 for course description.) 

MPS 621— Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1991. 

(See MPS 421 for course description.) 

MPS 622— Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1989. 

Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permission of i 
structor. 
(See MPS 422 for course description.) 

MPS 630— Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MPS 420 or equivalent. 
(See MPS 430 for course description.) 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



133 



*PS 701 — Advanced Fieldwork in Historical 
archaeology (0-10-5) 

Summer. Prerequisites: MPS 401 or 601, or 
ermission of instructor. 

An advanced course in historical archaeology 
lethodology within the framework of a field- 
chool. Students in this course will serve as crew 
hiefs, team leaders, and laboratory techni- 
lans, assuming an active role in the direction 
f excavation, recording, and preliminary anal- 
sis of cultural material. Some specialization 
ithin the field is required as a guide to devel- 
oment of excavation research goals and car- 
ing out the aims of the fieldwork. The course 
iay be repeated, but not for credit toward the 
9gree. 

PS 702 — Advanced Archaeological 
nalysis (0-10-5) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisite: Comple- 
)nof MPS 701. 

Work performed for this course will be utilized 
r writing a major report for the degree require- 
ent or for a thesis. The course will center 
ound individually designed research topics 
lating to materials recovered from archaeo- 
gical sites and their interpretation. It may be 
peaied but not for credit toward the degree. 

PS 725— Preservation Planning (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MPS 420. 
A study of the principles and practices of 
)mmunity planning and its application to his- 
ric preservation. The course will present the 
eservation planning process in terms of goals- 
Mng, survey, analysis execution and relation 
community power structure. 

PS 791-792— Independent Study (V-V-5) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: Stu- 
nts must have achieved either provisional or 
gular status in the graduate program and be 
good standing. (3.0 GPA), and completed HIS 
)0, or equivalent. 

Designed to substitute for required MPS 
njrses that a student has already taken as an 
idergraduate or to provide an opportunity for 
student to pursue individual research and 
adings in a chosen field under the supervision 
a member of the faculty. Application should 
3 filed during the early enrollment period of the 
jarter before the independent study will be 
Ken. Unanimous approval by the graduate 
)mmittee, or a majority vote of the department 
quired. 



MPS 795-796 — Internship in Preservation 
(O-V-5) 

Prerequisites: Regular admission status in the 
M.A. program; 15 hours of MPS coursework at 
the graduate level; HIS 500, and either HIS 670 
or HIS 671. 

The student will pursue an individually de- 
signed project involving off-campus study and 
research in an appropriate preservation agency. 
Projects are designed to require at least two 
quarter for completion, during which time the 
student will be under the joint supervision of the 
sponsoring agency and the faculty sponsor. 
Upon completion of the project, the student will 
present to a graduate committee a formal report, 
which must be approved in order to satisfy the 
Internship requirement for the M.A. degree. 

MPS 800-801— Thesis (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the 
comprehensive examinations. 

Planned research and writing directed by the 
student's thesis advisor. Normally, a student will 
register for 5 hours credit per quarter, using one 
quarter for research and one quarter for writing. 



Languages, Literature, and 
Dramatic Arts 



Faculty 

'Strozier, Robert, Department Head 

Andrews, Carol 
'Brooks, S. Kent 
'Brown, Hugh 

Cooksey, Thomas 

Echegoyen, Regina 

Jenkins, Marvin 

Martin, William 

Noble, David 

Nordquist. Richard 
"Raymond, Richard 
*Roth, Lorie 

Suchower, John 

Thomas. Holly 

Welsh, John 

White Virginia 

"Graduate Faculty 



English Composition 

Entering students should begin the required 
English core sequence in their initial quarter of 



134 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



attendance. Students must not delay beginning 
this sequence beyond their second quarter of 
attendance. Students must enroll in the appro- 
priate course in the core sequence and do so 
each quarter until they complete the sequence 
and/or pass the Regents' Test. ENG 101, 102, 
and 201 courses may not be dropped without 
permission from Dr. Strozier, Department Head. 
Students who do drop these courses without 
Department Head approval will receive a failing 
grade in the class. 

Transfer students who have not completed the 
required English composition courses pre- 
scribed by Armstrong degree programs will be 
expected to take an English Placement Test 
(EPT) to place the students in the appropriate 
English course. The exceptions to this require- 
ment are: students with an SAT verbal of 450 or 
above and a TSWE score of 40 or above, and 
University System students who have credit for 
ENG 101 and ENG 102. 

The transferred English composition credits 
will show the number and title of the sending 
institution so that the composition courses taken 
at Armstrong will not necessarily be shown as 
repeats. These transferred courses may then be 
used as elective credit to complete degree re- 
quirements. 

Exemptions from Core English 

Students who wish credit exemption for Eng- 
lish 101 must take the CLEP College Compo- 
sition and Essay examination and make a score 
of 53 (Grade equivalent of a "B") and make a 
"C" or above in English 102. Students who wish 
a credit exemption for English 1 02 must take the 
CLEP Analysis and Interpretation of Literature 
and Essay Examination and make a score of 55 
(Grade equivalent of "B") and make a "C" or 
above in English 201 . Students who make these 
scores in English 1 01 and 1 02 exams must make 
a "C" or above in English 201 to receive credit 
exemption for those courses. 

Students who score "3" or above on the AP 
exam also will receive credit exemption for Eng- 
lish 101, providing that they make "C" or better 
in English 102. 



Foreign Languages 

Students who, while enrolled at Armstrong 
State College, take their foreign language 
courses on another campus must pass an ap- 
propriate national standardized test with a score 



not lower than the 60 percentile on each part tc 
receive credit for 103 and/or 201. Students 
transferring to Armstrong State College, afte 
having completed the required foreign Ian 
guage sequence at another college, with "C's' 
or above, are not required to complete the pro 
ficiency examinations at Armstrong. 

Exemptions from Foreign Languages 

Students who wish a credit exemption for th< 
French or Spanish requirement must make < 
score of 45 (Grade equivalent of a "B") on the 
CLEP exam, and make a "C" or better in th( 
appropriate 201 class. Students who wish < 
credit exemption for German must make a scon 
of 44 (Grade equivalent of a "B" and make 
"C" or higher in German 201. For further infor 
mation students should contact the Head of th< 
Department of Languages, Literature, and Dra 
matic Arts, or Ms. Benson in Counseling an( 
Placement. 

Students majoring in English or in Drama 
Speech should satisfy the college core require 
ments for the Bachelor of Arts degree during thi 
freshman and sophomore years. Students mus 
earn a grade of "C" or better in each 300 or 40< 
level course included in any major or minor area 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
IN ENGLISH 

Hour 

A. General Requirements 10 

Areal 2 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 

Areall 2 

1. Two from: MAT 101, 103, 290.. 1 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 1 
Area III $ 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 
202; PSY 1.01; SOC 201 

Area IV 

1. Foreign language sequence 
through 201 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



135 



2. CS 115, and one of the follow- 
ing: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 

227, 228; MUS 200; PHI 201 .... 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 

3. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. ENG 301, 345 or 346 10 

2. One from ENG 341, 347, 350, 
356, 357 5 

3. One from ENG 352, 353, 354... 5 
. 4. One from ENG 333. 334, 335... 5 

5. ENG 311 and 312 10 

6. One from ENG 370, 371, 372, 
380, 382 5 

" 7. One course in literature in 

English 5 

:. Related Field Requirements 25 

Courses numbered 300 or 
above in the School of Arts, Sci- 
ences, & Education 25 

). Electives 20 

i. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 191 



TOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
*CHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR 
ENGLISH (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

v. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 
273; ENG 222; MUS 200 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 

290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 114or 191. 115or192;POS 

113 15 

. 2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence 
through 201 20 

2. DRS 228 or 341 5 

3. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 
202; SOC 201 5 



AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ENG301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. One from ENG 333, 334, 335... 5 

4. ENG 313or 314 5 

5. ENG 345 or 346 5 

6. ENG 380 or 382 5 

7. ENG 370 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

1. DRS/FLM 350 or 351, and ap- 
proved elective 10 

2. PHI 400 or approved elective... 5 

D. Professional Sequences 45 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 
422, 439, 481, 482, 483 40 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 5 

E. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 201 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
DRAMA-SPEECH 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One from; ANT 201; ECO 201; 
PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence 
through 201 20 

2. DRS 227, 228 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



136 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. DRS341, 342, 345, 346; ENG 

301 25 

2. Two from: DRS 450, 451 , 452 .. 10 

3. One from: DRS 340, 347, 350, 

351 5 

4. One from:" DRS 400; ENG 400, 
401, 402 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1 . ENG 345, 346, 356, 357, 360, 

365 20 

2. One from: ART 200, 271, 272, 
273; MUS200; PHI 201 5 

3. One course from: LIN 380, 382 5 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
ENGLISH (Communications Concentration) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 '..... 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. Two from: 

MAT 101, 103, 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence.. 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 ' 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 
202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence 
through 201 20 

2. CS 115 and one of the following: 
ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 
227; MUS 200; PHI 201 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



B. Courses in the Major Field 4! 

1 . Two from ENG 370, 372, JRN 

343 M 

2. DRS 228 and 341 1i 

3. ENG 311 and 312 11 

4. ENG 313 and 314 1i 

5. One from ENG 333, 334, 335... i 

C. Related Field Requirements 2; 

1. One from: FLM 340, FLM 350, 
FLM351 | 

2. One from: DRS 347, ART 204, 

211 : 

3. One from: HIS 351, HIS 352, 
SOC 333 

4. One course selected from: 
ENG 400, DRS 400, PHI 400, 
JRN 400 

5. One upper division course from 
Arts, Sciences, and Education 

D. Electives j 

1. ENG 499 

2. Electives I 

TOTAL 19 



Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations availabl 
from the Department of Languages, Literatun 
and Dramatic Arts.. For completion of each 
the minors, the student must earn a "C" or bett< 
in each course offered for the minor. 

The minors and their requirements are: 

Hou» 

Communications e 

1 . ENG 370, JRN 343, ENG 372 .. 

2. DRS/FLM/JRN 350, DRS/FLM 
351, ART 211, 204, 314, 315.... 

3. ENG 499, ENG 400, DRS 400, 
FLM 401, JRN 400 

4. DRS 228 or 341 

5. One 300-400 course in Lan- 
guages, Literature, and Dra- 
matic Arts 

English 

English electives at the 300- 
400 level (only 5 hours of 
499) 

Film : 

1. DRS/FLM 340, 351 

2. DRS/FLM 350, DRS/FLM 401 ... 
Foreign Language 

20 hours in one language at 
the 300-400 level 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



137 



inguistics 20 

Courses selected from ENG/ 
LIN 325, 340, 410; LIN 400, 

485 20 

hilosophy 20 

Philosophy electives at the 
300-400 level 20 



>rama-Speech Offerings 

Successful completion of ENG 101 is prereq- 
isite to all DRS courses with the exception of 
•RS 227. 

RS 227— Theatre Laboratory (0-3-1) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student 
ill work on the Masquers' production of the 
uarter. Only one hour of credit may be earned 
er quarter. The maximum total credit allowed 

Theatre Laboratory is five quarter hours. 

In the summer students may take up to five 
Durs credit in DRS 227 by working part time in 
jmmer theatre workshop (DRS 450). 

RS 228— Speech Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practice and theory of oral communication, 
ach student makes several major speeches. 
ne physiology of the speech mechanisms is 
Dvered, and articulation is studied within the 
amework of the international Phonetic Alpha- 
et. 

RS/FLM 340— Development of the Cinema 
i-0-5) 

Same as FLM 340. 

A study of the history and development of the 
nema with special emphasis on the American 
ominance of the medium. 

RS 341— Oral Interpretation (5-0-5) 

j Fall. 
The oral interpretation of poetry and prose. 
~ie techniques of literary analysis and the vocal 
pchniques needed to communicate an author's 
pood and meaning are stressed. 

RS 342— Dynamics of Performing 
i-0-5) 

' Alternates with DRS 345. Winter. Prerequi- 
tes: ENG 101 plus at least two credit hours in 
RS 227. 



Intensive study of characterization and styles 
of acting from several points; historical, critical, 
practical, theoretical, and experimental. Empha- 
sis on development of performance skills. 

DRS 345— History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

Alternates with DRS 342, Winter. 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginning to 
the present day emphasizing the development 
of the physical theatre 

DRS 346— Play Production (5-0-5) 

Alternating Spring quarters. 

The theory and practice of acting and direct- 
ing with special attention to image-making on 
stage. Individuals under supervision prepare 
and execute the production of scenes and short 
plays. 

DRS/JRN 347— Basic TV Production 
(2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. 

The theory and practice of television produc- 
tion styles, forms, and concepts, with special 
emphasis on the critical appreciation of elec- 
tronic communication techniques. 

DRS/FLM/JRN 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM 350 and JRN 350. 
Study of film with emphasis on critical appre- 
ciation of film as an art form. 

DRS/FLM 351— Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Summer. Same as FLM 351. Prerequisite: 
DRS/FLM 350. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
with emphasis on the differences of the media 
in form, content and perception. 

DRS 400— Special Topics in 
Communications (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Alternates with DRS 347, Spring, Fall. Prereq- 
uisite: ENG 101. 

The special subject matter in this course is 
announced when the course is offered. 

DRS/FLM 401— Topics in Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Film 350 or 351. 

The special subject matter of this course will 
be announced when the course is offered. Top- 
ics include: Film Genres, Auteurs, and Critical 
Theory. 

DRS 450-451-452— Drama Workshop 
(0-15-5) 

Summer only. 

Summer stock theatre for credit Students are 
directed and instructed by a member of the fac- 
ulty who is a professional in the theatre All as- 
pects of production will be studied 



138 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DRS 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior sta- 
tus plus ENG 101 plus at least one 300 level 
DRS course. Open to transient students only 
with the permission of Dean of Faculty at Arm- 
strong and the college from which the student 
comes. 

English Offerings 

ENG 025— Composition Review (5-0-5) 

Institutional Credit. 

Designed to correct deficiencies in writing re- 
vealed by the Regents' Test. Prerequisite: Com- 
pletion of the English core requirements of the 
student's program. 

ENG 101— Composition (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Each student should attain at least one of the 
following prior to enrolling: (a) a combination of 
450 SAT Verbal/40 TSWE (Test of Standard Writ- 
ten English) scores, or (b) the prescribed level 
of performance on the English Placement Test 
(EPT), or (c) a grade of "P" in English 099. 

For the student having demonstrable ability in 
reading, writing, and organizing. The student will 
sharpen his skills by writing themes of varying 
length and complexity utilizing techniques 
learned from intensive study of essays in four 
rhetorical modes (description, narration, expo- 
sition, and argumentation). The course also aims 
to increase the student's awareness of language 
itself. Readings in addition to the essay may be 
used. 

ENG 102— Composition II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfac- 
tory completion of ENG 101 or ENG 191. 

Gives the student guided practice in reading 
and compositional skills. The course introduces 
literary forms and language — fiction, poetry, 
drama — using readings in and study of those 
forms to stimulate the writing of interpretive and 
critical papers. 

ENG 192 — Honors Composition and 
Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "B" in 
English 101 and the recommendation of the 
English 101 instructor and approval of the De- 
partment Head. 

The student will read and write in greater 
depth than in English 102. 



ENG 201— Selections in World Literature 
(5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: ENG 10; 
or ENG 192. 

Completes the Core I sequence. Organizec 
around literary and extra-literary materials, th( 
course facilitates student investigation of en 
during issues and ideas found in world literature 
Research techniques are introduced. The spe 
cific content in each section of this course ij 
announced quarterly. 

ENG 222— Topics in the Humanities 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201 . 

A thematic approach to major works in th. 
humanities designed to awaken and heighte 
the student's awareness of traditional and cor 
temporary issues. Topics will be announced. 

ENG 292— Honors Composition and 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" i 
English 192 or minimum grade of "B" in Englis 
1 02 and the recommendation of the English 1 
instructor. 

The student will read and write in greate 
depth than in English 201. 

Please Note: ENG 201 is prerequisite to all EN 
300-400 courses. ENG 311 and 312 are pn 
requisite for all English courses 330 throuc 
499, except ENG 370 through 382. 

ENG 301 — Introduction to Literary Studies 
(5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

Familiarizes the English major with the voca 
ulary and approaches of modern literary OH 
cism, advances abilities in the reading ar 
interpretation of literary texts, and promotes u 
derstanding of the tools of literary research ar 
writing. 

ENG 311— Survey of English Literature I 
(5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A survey of the major works of English lit< 
ature from its beginnings at the end of the 11 
century. Includes the Beowulf poet, Chauo 
Spencer and Milton. 

ENG 312— Survey of English Literature II 
(5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A survey of major works from the beginni 
of the 19th century to the contemporary peric 
Includes the Romantics, the Victorians and 
Moderns. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



139 



:NG 313— World Literature (5-0-5) 

Winter. Alternate years. 
A study of major works and movements in 
•orld literature through the Renaissance. 

:NG 314— World Literature II (5-0-5) 

Spring. Alternate years. 
A study of major works and movements in 
nodern world literature. 

NG 333 — American I: Beginnings through 
830. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Alternate years. 

A survey of significant American poetry and 
»rose from the Atlantic migration to the Jack- 
onian Age, the course emphasizes develop- 
nent of a literature with a uniquely American 
haracter. 

1NG 334 — American II: Emerson through 
wain. (5-0-5) 

Winter, Alternate years. 

A critical examination of the art and ideas of 
le major writers of the American Renais- 
ance — Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, 
horeau, Whitman, and Dickinson. Traces the 
•volution of Transcendental Romanticism into 
le Realism of Twain. 

•NG 335 — American III: Rise of Naturalism 
o the Present. (5-0-5) 

Spring, Alternate years. 

The cultural and ideological bases and evo- 
jtion of American Realism and Naturalism are 
)robed in the works of James, Crane, Norris, 
ind Dreiser as well as contemporary writers and 
nodernists such as Eliot, Stevens, Faulkner, 
: rost, Robinson, Fitzgerald, and Cummings. 

ENG 341— Early English Literature, 
beginnings through 1603. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 302. Fall. 

Surveys major English literature from the 
eighth century to the death of Elizabeth I. Em- 
phasis is on the development of a literature that 
eflects the diversified England of this 800-year 
)eriod. Writers include: the Beowulf poet and 
)ther Old English authors, early Middle English 
yrics and the major figures of the 14th century 
the Pearl Poet, Chaucer, Langland, Gower). 

ENG 345— Shakespeare I (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

A comprehensive study of the tragedies, com- 
edies, and history plays drawn from Taming of 
he Shrew, Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of 
Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like 
t, Troilus and Cressida. Measure for Measure, 



Richard II, Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, Henry V, Titus 
Andronicus, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth, 
Antony and Cleopatra, and Conolanus. 

ENG 346— Shakespeare II (5-0-5) 

Spring or Fall. 

A second comprehensive study of the tra- 
gedies, comedies and history plays drawn from 
A Comedy of Errors, Love's Labor's Lost, Romeo 
and Juliet, Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth 
Night, Hamlet, Othello, A Winter's Tale, The Tem- 
pest, Pericles, Cymbeline, All's Well That Ends 
Well, Two Gentlemen of Verona, King John, Ti- 
mor) of Athens, Richard III, Henry VI, and Henry 
VIII. 

ENG 347— 17th Century British Poetry and 
Prose: 1603-1689. (5-0-5) 

A survey of the major nondramatic literature 
from the death of Elizabeth I to the reign of Wil- 
liam and Mary, this course places its major em- 
phasis upon the metaphysical and classical 
traditions in English poetry. Authors include 
Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Crashaw, 
Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Bacon, Brown, Bun- 
yan, Dryden, and Rochester. 

ENG 350— 18th Century British Poetry and 
Prose. (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A survey of British poetry and prose from 1 690 
to 1 784, this course acquaints students with the 
philosophic and aesthetic concerns of the age 
as reflected chiefly but not exclusively in the 
works of Swift, Pope, and Johnson. 

ENG 352— 19th Century I: British Romantic 
Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

Winter or Spring. 

An examination of the works of the major Ro- 
mantic writers including Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

ENG 353— 19th Century II: British Victorian 
Poetry and Prose. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 343, Spring. 

An examination of the responses of novelists, 
poets, and prose writers to the issues troubling 
Victorian England: the conflict between science 
and religion, the faith in "progress." the growth 
of industrialism, the rights of the individual and 
of the society, and the role of the artist. 

ENG 354— 20th Century British Poetry and 
Prose. (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 342. Spring 
A study of major figures — James, Conrad, 
Lawrence, Yeats, Hardy, Auden, Thomas — 



140 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



within the context of continental developments 
(Symbolism, Proust, Rilke), Eliot, and the con- 
cept of "modernism." 

ENG 356 — British Drama: Beginnings to 
1750.(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 365. Winter or Spring. 

Medieval and Renaissance Non-Shakespear- 
ean drama; stresses the plays of Marlowe, Jon- 
son, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton and 
Webster; and grounds the student in the con- 
ventions and traditions of Medieval and early 
Tudor drama. 

ENG 357— British Drama II. 1630-1800. 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with English 356 and 365 Winter or 
Spring. Restoration and Eighteenth Century 
Drama; begins with Pre-Restoration, late Caro- 
line drama; and stresses the plays of Ford, Shir- 
ley, Dryden, Lee, Otway, Etherege, Wycherley, 
Congreve, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

ENG 360— Ancient Epic and Drama 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Alternate years. 

A study of major works of antiquity. Authors 
include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euri- 
pides, and other significant figures. 

ENG 365— British, American, and 
Continental Drama: Ibsen to the Present. 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 356, Winter. 

A survey of 19th and 20th century British, 
American and European plays. Movements in- 
clude Realism, the Irish Renaissance. Expres- 
sionism, Impressionism, and Theater of the 
Absurd. Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, O'Casey, Wilde, 
Strindberg, O'Neill, and Williams are among the 
dramatists studied. 

ENG 370— Advanced Composition 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 371. Fall. 
The study of expository and argumentative 
techniques. 

ENG 371— Creative Writing (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Students submit manuscripts — stories, 
poems, plays — which they then critique by writ- 
ten statement and by class discussion under the 
guidance of the instructor. 



ENG 372 — Technical and Business 
Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Students learn to report technical information 
clearly and persuasively. Assignments include 
technical descriptions and instructions, memo- 
randa, business letters, reports, and research 
articles. Emphasizes writing and includes ora 
presentations using visual aids. 

ENG/LIN 380— Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 410, Spring. 

A study of current approaches to grammai 
(including generative transformational); phon- 
ology, morphology and syntax are studied. 

ENG/LIN 382— History of English Language 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the English language from its be 
ginnings in the fifth and sixth centuries to its 
world-wide expansion in the 20th. Traces the 
language chronologically from Old to Middle tc 
Modern English. Emphasis is on the phonetic 
syntactic, and lexical changes with weight giver 
both to internal and external influences. 

ENG 400— Special Topic (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is of 
fered. Subjects include: Modernism: 1 880-1 94C 
Apartheid in Perspective; World-wide Englis! 
Literature, Decadence, Women in Literature. 

ENG 401— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is o 
fered. Genres include: New England Poets; Vic 
torian Novel, Eighteeneth Century Nove 
Russian Novel, Southern Fiction, British Dram*' 
Nineteenth-Century American Novel. 

ENG 402— Special Author (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is o 
fered. Authors include: Faulkner, Eliot am 
Aiken, Twain, Hardy, Fielding, Chaucer, Miltor 
Frost, and Dickinson. 

ENG 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status. Available to trar 
sient students under the following condition: 
approval of the Dean of the faculty and Dean ( 
the college from which the student comes. 

ENG 491— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status. Available to trar 
sient students under the following condition: 
approval of the Dean of the Faculty and Dea 
of the college from which the student comes. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



141 



!NG 499— Internship (Up to 15 hrs) 

Offered by Special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
unior status, a 2.5 GPA, a supervisory staff 
nember, recommendation of the departmental 
iternship Committee, and approval of the De- 
iartment head. May be repeated to a maximum 
if 15 credit hours. 

The student pursues an individually designed 
iroject involving off-campus work, study, and/ 
■ research. Projects are under the joint super- 
ision of the sponsoring institution and the staff 
nember. Fifteen hours credit requires forty 
ours a week at the sponsoring institution. Ten 
ours credit requires twenty-five hours a week; 
ve hours credit requires fifteen hours a week. 

ilm Offerings 

LM/DRS 340— Development of the Cinema 
>-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the history and development of the 
inema with special emphasis on the American 
ominance of the medium. 

LM/DRS 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Same as JRN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appre- 
iation of film as an art form. 

LM/DRS 351— Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FLM/DRS 350. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
/ith emphasis on the differences of the media 
i form, content, and perception. 

LM/DRS 401— Topics in Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FLM 350 or 351. 

Special subject matter is announced when the 
ourse is offered. Topics: film genres, auteurs, 
md critical theory. 

"oreign Language Offerings 

r RE 101-102-103— Elementary French One, 
Iwo, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provides the student with the elements of 
: rench reading, composition, and conversation. 
!~he approach is primarily oral; daily practice 
vith tape recordings is required. 

=RE 201— Intermediate French (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French 
3r three years of high school French. Continued 
smphasis on the reading of text as well as on 
oral and composition skills. 



FRE 300 — Special Topics in the French 
Language (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 201. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the 
structure and grammar of the French language 
stressing oral usage. 

FRE 305 — Special Topics in French 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 201. 

Subject matter is announced when the course 
is offered. Includes: surveys of Nineteenth and 
Twentieth-Century literature. 

FRE 351-352-353 — Study Abroad in France 
(V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: FRE 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in 
France in conjunction with the Studies Abroad 
Program of the University System of Georgia. 
The program lasts for a period of 8-9 weeks. The 
student receives intensive instruction in lan- 
guage and culture and participates in Univer- 
sity-sponsored activities. 

FRE 401— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 305 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course 
is offered. Subjects include: Seventeenth, Eight- 
eenth, and Nineteenth-Century Theatre; Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth-Century Fiction. 

FRE 402— Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 305 or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course 
is offered. Authors include: Flaubert, Hugo, Zola, 
Malraux. 

FRE 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: FRE 305 or approval of instruc- 
tor. 

Transient students may take this course only 
with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Arm- 
strong and the college from which the student 
comes. 

GER 101-102-103— Elementary German 
One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year 

Elements of reading and writing; basic vo- 
cabulary; simple conversation; essentials of 
grammar. 

GER 201— Intermediate German (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Ger- 
man or three years of high school German Con- 



142 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



tinued emphasis on reading of text as well as 
on oral and composition skills. 

GER 300 — Special Topics in the German 
Language (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Readings in the various uses of German, from 
the popular to the literary, throughout the history 
of the language. 

GER 305— Special Topics in German 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Subject matter is announced when the course 
is offered. Topics include: surveys of Eighteenth, 
Nineteenth, and Twentieth Century German lit- 
erature. 

GER 351-352-353— Study Abroad in 
Germany (V-V1 5) 

Prerequisite: GER 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in 
Germany in conjunction with the Studies Abroad 
Program of the University System of Georgia. 
The program lasts for 8-9 weeks. The student 
receives intensive instruction in language and 
culture and participates in University sponsored 
activities. 

GER 401— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of in- 
structor. 

Subject is announced when the course is of- 
fered. Subjects include: Mediaeval Poetry; 
Prose, Poetry, and Drama in the 17th and 18th 
Century; the Novella in the 19th Century; 20th 
Century Prose. 

GER 402— Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 305 or permission of 
instructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is of- 
fered. Authors include: Grimmelshausen, 
Goethe, Schiller, Thomas Mann, Kafka, Grass. 

GER 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or GER 
201. Transient students may take this course 
only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from which the stu- 
dent comes. 

LAT 101-102-103— Elementary Latin One, 
Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Three courses offered each year. 
Essentials of grammar; readings from se- 
lected Latin authors. 



LAT 201— Intermediate Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Latii 
or three years of high school Latin. 

Further readings in Latin literature with specie 
emphasis on Vergil and Ovid. 

LAT 300— Readings in Latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201 . 

Readings from the 2,000 years of Latinity fron 
Plautus to the recent encycilcals. 

LAT/CLA 351-352-353— Study Abroad in 
Rome and Athens (V-V-15) 

A summer quarter's residence and study ii 
Rome and Athens in conjunction with the Studie 
Abroad Program of the University System c 
Georgia. Taught in English. Through visits 1 
monuments, museums, and classical ruins, an< 
on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tar 
quinia, and Fanscati the student experience 
first hand the reality of life in the ancient worlc 

LAT 396 — Latin Language and Culture in 
Rome (15-0-15) 

Summer. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or the equiv 
alent. 

Classes meet in Rome for 3 hours a day, 
days a week, for 7 weeks, to speak, read, an 
hear Latin. Students practice composition ou 
side of class and travel to places of cultural sic 
nificance. 

SPA 101-102-103— Elementary Spanish 
One-Two-Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of Spar 
ish reading, composition, and conversation. 

SPA 201— Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Spar 
ish or three years of high school Spanish. Cor 
tinued emphasis on reading of texts as well a 
oral and composition skills. 

SPA 300 — Special Topics in the Spanish 
Language (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201. 

Advanced analysis and examination of th 
structure and grammar of the Spanish languag 
stressing oral usage. 

SPA 305 — Special Topics in Spanish 
Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201. 

Subject is announced when the course is o 
fered. Topics include: surveys of Nineteenth an 
Twentieth-Century literature selected to engligt 
ten student awareness of the heritage and dej 
velopment of Spanish letters. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



143 



SPA 309 — Conversational Spanish (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201 or permission of 
nstructor. 

This course focuses on the practicality of the 
Spanish language in true-to-life conversation 
and situations. Emphasis is given to communi- 
cative activities that provide a cultural back- 
ground of Spain and Latin American countries. 
The course is directed towards oral proficiency. 

SPA 351-352-353— Study Abroad in Spain 
[V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: SPA 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in 
Spain in conjunction with the Studies Abroad 
3 rogram of the University System of Georgia. 
_asts for 8-9 weeks. Students receive intensive 
nstruction in language and culture comple- 
nented by a number of excursions. 

SPA 401 —Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 305 or permission of 
nstructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is of- 
ered. Genres include: Nineteenth and Twen- 
ieth Century Spanish and Latin American 
novels, short stories, and poetry. 

SPA 402— Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 305 or permission of 
nstructor. 

Subject is announced when the course is of- 
fered. Authors include: Carlos Fuentes, Garcia 
Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Frederico Garcia 
Lorca, Miguel de Unamuno. 

SPA 490— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and SPA 
201. Transient students may take this course 
only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty 
at Armstrong and the college from which the 
student comes. 



Journalism Offerings 

JRN 343— Journalistic Writing and 
Editing (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENG 201. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the 
techniques of modern journalism with emphasis 
on writing and editing for newspapers and mag- 
azines. 

JRN 347— Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. Same 
as DRS 347. 



A study of the theory and practice of television 
production styles, forms, and concepts, with 
special emphasis on the critical appreciation of 
electronic communication techniques. 

JRN 350— Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM/DRS 350. 
Study of film with emphasis on critical appre- 
ciation of film as an art form. 

JRN 400 — Topics in Journalism (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: JRN 340 or 343 or permis- 
sion of instructor 

A seminar on the impact of the media on the 
world today. Topics include rights and respon- 
sibilities of journalists, censorship, media con- 
trol, propaganda, and other current issues. 



Linguistics Offerings 

LIN 370 — Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 371, Fall. Prerequisite: 
ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Same as ENG 
370. 

A study of expository and report techniques. 

LIN 380— Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 382, Spring. Same as 
ENG/LIN 380. 

A study of current approaches to grammar 
(including generative transformational): phon- 
ology, morphology, and syntax will be studied. 

LIN 382— History of the English Language 
(5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 380. Spring. Same as 
ENG/LIN 382. 

LIN 400— Topics in Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: ENG— LIN 380 or 382 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in both the- 
oretical and applied linguistics. Topics are an- 
nounced. The course may be taken more than 
once for credit as topics change. 



Philosophy Offerings 

Please Note: ENG 101 is prerequisite: to all 
following PHI courses. 

PHI 201— Introduction to Philosophy 
(5-0-5) 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning 
and function of philosophy, and the vocabulary 
and problems of philosophy. Includes a survey 



144 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



of the basic issued and major types of philos- 
ophy and shows the sources in experience, his- 
tory, and representative thinkers. 

PHI 301— History of Philosophy; Ancient 
and Medieval (5-0-5) 

An historical introduction to philosophy, trac- 
ing the development of European philosophy 
from the early Greeks through the Middle Ages, 
with emphasis on selected works of major phi- 
losophers. 

PHI 302— History of Modern Philosophy 
(5-0-5) 

European philosophy from the Renaissance 
through Kant, emphasizing selected works of 
major philosophers. 

PHI 303— 19th and 20th Century Philosophy 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the major philosophers in philo- 
sophical movements of the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies. 

PHI 400— Special Topics (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: One 200 or 
300 philosophy course. 

Subject is announced when the course is of- 
fered. Current courses: Aesthetics, Philosophy 
of Religion, Ethics, Nietzsche. 

PHI 490— Independent Study (1 -5)-0-(1 -5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Senior sta- 
tus and one 300-philosophy course. 

The student, with the advice and consent of 
this supervising professor and of the department 
head, selects the topic for supervised inde- 
pendent study and submits a prospectus for de- 
partment approval before the quarter in which 
the course is to be taken. Transient students 
may take this course only with permission of the 
Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 



Graduate Program and 
Courses 

Coordinator: Dr. Robert Strozier 



Objectives 

The Department of Languages, Literature, 
and Dramatic Arts offers graduate courses as a 
support service for several graduate degree 
programs, English teachers, elementary, and 
middle school teachers, and teachers seeking 



certificate renewal. These courses also offer op- 
portunity for professional growth and cultural enr 
richment for individuals who hold a Bachelor's 
degree but do not wish to pursue a graduate 
degree. 



OFFERINGS 

All courses are open to undergraduate and 
graduate students. 



Drama/Speech and Drama/Speech — Film 
Offerings 

DRS/FLM 351/551— Film and Literature 
(5-0-5) 

Studies in the translation of literature to film 
with emphasis on the differences of the media 
in form, content, and perception. 

DRS 450-451 -452/650-651 -652— Summer 
Theater (5-15-5) 



English Offerings 

ENG 333/533 — American Literature to 1830 
(5-0-5) 

ENG 334/534 — American Literature: 
Emerson through Twain (5-0-5) 

ENG 335/535 — American Literature: 
Naturalism to the Present (5-0-5) 

ENG 341/541— Early British Literature 
Through 1603(5-0-5) 

ENG 345/545— Shakespeare I (5-0-5) 

ENG 346/546— Shakespeare II (5-0-5) 

ENG 347/547— British Literature: 17th 
Century (5-0-5) 

ENG 350/550— British Literature: 1600-1800 
(5-0-5) 

ENG 352/552— 19th Century I: British 
Romantic Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 353/553— 19th Century II: British 
Victorian Poetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 354/554— 20th Century: British Poetry 
and Prose (5-0-5) 

ENG 400/600— Special Topics (5-0-5) 

ENG 401/601— Special Genre (5-0-5) 

ENG 402/602— Special Author (5-0-5) 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



145 



Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

r aculty 

/Vheeler, Ed, Department Head 

Barnard Jane 

: indeis, John 

Hansen, John 

Harbin, Mickie Sue 

Hudson, Anne 

Hudson, Sigmund 

Cilhefner, Dale 

yiunson, Richard 

\lorwich, Vicki 

Shipley, Charles 



Graduate Faculty 



The Mathematics and Computer Science De- 
)artment offers a wide range of services to the 
\SC student. Several introductory courses are 
ivailable both to satisfy the general education 
leeds of the student and to satisfy prerequisites 
n the major program. A minor program in either 
nathematics or computer science can be de- 
signed to complement the rest of a student's 
Drogram. A major in the mathematical sciences 
allows the student to choose from among four 
options; a flexible computer science major 
neets the needs of students with a number of 
different interests. 

rhe Mathematical Sciences Major: Option 1 
Df this major is entitled "Mathematics" and pre- 
Dares students intending to pursue graduate 
studies in mathematics. Option 3 is entitled 
'Mathematics Education" and prepares stu- 
dents to teach in public and private secondary 
schools. This option is an approved program for 
the Georgia Teacher's Professional Four Year 
Certificate (T-4). Option 4 is entitled "Computer 
Science" and is available for students who de- 
sire a dual concentration in mathematics and 
computer science. 

The most flexible of the four options is Option 
2 entitled "Applied Mathematics." This option is 
a good choice for students preparing for a va- 
riety of careers in business and industry, in- 
tending to attend graduate school in a 
quantitative area such as biostatistics, econom- 
ics, or operations research, or wishing to partic- 
ipate in a Dual-Degree Program in engineering. 



The Computer Science Major: In recent 
years this major has equipped many students 
to step into a broad spectrum of jobs in the 
computer industry. The degree features a core 
of courses designed to provide a solid foun- 
dation in theoretical computer science as well 
as practical programming experience. Degree 
options beyond the core include a sequence 
permitting specialization in data management 
systems and software engineering and a se- 
quence in computer systems. Additional 
breadth is available through electives in Com- 
munication and Networks, Compiler Theory, C 
Programming under UNIX (tm), and a topics 
course that is constantly changed to keep stu- 
dents on the forefront of knowledge. A variety 
of internships and cooperative education place- 
ments provide students with opportunities for 
practical experience in the discipline. 

Co-ops and Internships: Students in the 
mathematical sciences and computer science 
are able to compete for cooperative education 
positions and internships at major Savannah 
employers such as Gulf Stream, Savannah 
Foods, SEPCO and Union Camp. Such positions 
provide students invaluable opportunities to ac- 
quire practical experience that complements 
their classroom experience. 

The Dual Degree Program: Under arrange- 
ments with Georgia Tech students may in five 
years of study earn simultaneously the BS de- 
gree in the mathematical sciences from Arm- 
strong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of 
a number of fields of engineering from Georgia 
Tech. Armstrong participates in similar pro- 
grams with other major universities. Students 
considering this option should contact an ad- 
visor in the Mathematics and Computer Science 
Department as soon as possible. 

Minors: Students in any major program 
whatever (either two year or four year) can aug- 
ment their major with a minor in mathematics or 
a minor in computer science. 

The minor in mathematics requires MAT 206. 
207, 208, and ten additional quarter hours cho- 
sen from MAT 216, MAT 260 and 300-400 level 
mathematics courses (excluding MAT 391 and 
MAT 393). 

The minor in computer science consists of the 
courses CS 142, CS 231, CS 242, CS 301 and 
CS 308 

Special Academic Regulations: 

1 . To earn the BS degree in the mathematical 
sciences or computer science, a student 
must successfully complete with a grade of 



146 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C or better all mathematics and computer 
science courses in area IV of the core and 
all courses in Section B, Courses in the Ma- 
jor Field. 
2. To fulfill the prerequisites for any mathe- 
matics or computer science course one 
must obtain a grade of "C" (or above) in 
each prerequisite course except Mathe- 
matics 101. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 
102; CHE 128, 129 (required for 
dual degree students); PHY 
217,218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and one course se- 
lected from: PSY 101 (required 
for math education option); SOC 
201; ECO 201, 202; ANT 201... 10 

ArealV 30 

1. CS142 5 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216, 260 20 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses.... 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 30 

Option One — Mathematics: 

1 . MAT 309, 31 1 , 401 

2. One of MAT 31 7, 402, or 41 6 

3. Additional approved electives in 
mathematics 

Option Two — Applied Mathematics 

1. MAT 321, 341 

2. One of CS 231, 246, 242 

3. One of MAT 31 1 , 31 7, 401 , 41 6 

4. Additional courses from: MAT 
309, 317, 322, 342, 346, 353, 
401 , 406, 490 



Option Three— Mathematics Education 

1. MAT 311, 321, 336 

2. MAT 416 or 470 

3. Additional approved mathemat- 
ics electives 

Option Four — Computer Science 

1. MAT 321 

2. Two of MAT 322, 341 , 342, 346, 
353 

3. CS 242, 301, 305 

C. Courses Related to Major 25 

Option One — Mathematics 

1. Language or approved com- 
puter science 10 

2. Approved electives from math- 
ematics or related field 15 

Option Two — Applied Mathematics 

One of the following sequences: 

1. PHY 217, 218, 219 with 
additional approved electives in 
chemistry, physics, or 
engineering 

2. ACC 211, 212 and ECO 201, 
202, 330 

3. Approved computer science 
courses 

4. Approved biology courses in- 
cluding BIO 370 or 480 

5. Approved chemistry courses 
Option Three — Mathematics Education 

1 . PSY 301 or EDU 302 
1 2. EDN 200, 441, EXC 410, EDU 
335 
Option Four — Computer Science 

1. CS 312, 360 and approved 
electives in computer science 

D. Electives 4( 

Students in Options 1, 2, and 4 
may choose any electives. Stu- 
dents in option 3 must use these 
hours to complete student 
teaching and special area 
requirements.* 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
* Mathematics education students must selec 
one elective from each of the following block? 
of courses: 

A. ART 200, 271 , 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 221 

B. ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



147 



ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A MAJOR 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Hours 

I General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101. 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200; PHI 201 5 

AREAII 20 

1. MAT 103. 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101 , 
102; CHE 128, 129; PHY 217, 

218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 292 10 

2. POS 1 13 and one of the 
courses: PSY 101; SOC 201; 
ECO 201, 202; ANT 201 10 

ArealV 30 

1. MAT 207, 265 

2. CS 142, 231, 242 

3. HIS 251 or 252 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

K Major Field Requirements 45 

1. CS301, 305, 308, 312, 342 

2. One of the following sequences: 

a. CS 331, 431 and one of CS 
434 or 401 

b. CS 360, 401 and one of 402 
or 445 

3. Five quarter hours of approved 
computer science electives 

Z. Related Field Requirements 25 

1 . ENG 344 

2. MAT 321 

3. On course from MAT 208, 216, 
322, 346, 353 

4. Two additional approved elec- 
tives from quantitative and sci- 
entific disciplines 



D. Electives 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



OFFERINGS 
Mathematics Offerings 

MAT 101— College Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Real number arithmetic; polynomial and ra- 
tional expressions; linear and quadratic equa- 
tions; functions and graphs; inequalities; 
absolute value; sequences and summation no- 
tation: matrices, determinants, and systems of 
equations; the binomial theorem; techniques of 
counting and elementary probability. 

Placement recommendation: MAT 101 is the 
gateway course to the college level curriculum 
in mathematics. Before enrolling in MAT 101 
some students should reinforce their mathe- 
matics skills by completing a course in the de- 
velopmental studies curriculum (DSM 99). 
Specifically, if a student falls into any one the 
following categories, the student should con- 
sider enrolling in DSM 99. 

a. The student did not complete 
two years of algebra and one 
year of geometry in high school. 

b. The student made below 420 on 
the mathematics portion of the 
SAT examination. 

c. Five or more years have 
elapsed since the student com- 
pleted a mathematics course. 

MAT 103 — Pre-Calculus Mathematics 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101, a score of at least 550 on the math- 
ematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the 
department head. 

Functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, 
logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigono- 
metric; trigonometric identities; law of sines and 
cosines; complex numbers. 



148 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 195 — Applied Finite Mathematics 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

A survey of finite mathematics, including 
mathematics of finance, probability, linear pro- 
gramming, and an introduction to games and 
decisions; applications are stressed throughout. 

MAT 206— Calculus I (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 103, a score of at least 600 on the math- 
ematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the 
department head. 

Functions; the derivative and its applications, 
antidifferentiation; the definite integral. 

MAT 207— Calculus II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 206. 

Techniques and applications of integration; 
conic sections and polar coordinates. 

MAT 208— Calculus of Several Variables I 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 207. 

Parametric curves and vectors in the plane; 
indeterminate forms. Taylor's formula, and im- 
proper integrals; infinite series; vectors, curves, 
and surfaces in space; partial differentiation. 

MAT 216— Linear Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 207. 

Linear systems and matrices; vector spaces; 
linear independence, rank of a matrix; linear 
transformations; determinants; introduction to 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors; diagonalization; 
applications. 

MAT 220— Elementary Statistics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101. 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; 
probability distributions; inferences concerning 
means; analysis of variance; correlation; linear 
regression. 

MAT 260— Introduction to Mathematical 
Proof (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 207. 

Elementary logic, sets, functions and rela- 
tions, methods of proof including induction, and 
selected topics from abstract algebra. 

MAT 265— Discrete Mathematics for 
Computer Science 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Elementary logic; naive set theory; relations 
and functions; graphs; finite automata; Turing 
machines; formal languages and grammars. 



MAT 290— The Spirit and Structure of 
Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

A terminal course of selected topics designee 
to portray the history, philosophy, and aesthetics 
of mathematics, and to develop an appreciatior 
of the role of mathematics in western though 
and contemporary culture. 

MAT 309— Calculus of Several Variables II 
(5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Multiple integrals and their applications; vec 
tor fields; line and surface integrals; Green': 
theorem; the Divergence theorem; Stokes theo 
rem; differential equations. 

MAT 311— Abstract Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

Elementary properties of integers; groups 
rings, and fields; mappings, homomorphisms 
kernels, and quotient structures. 

MAT 317— Advanced Linear Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 216, MAT 260. 

Abstract vector spaces, linear tranformations 
eigenvectors and eigenvalues, diagonalizatior 
inner product spaces, real quadratic forms. 

MAT 321— Probability & Mathematical 
Statistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207. MAT/CS 260. 

Data collection, organization, and descriptioi 
probability; random variables; discrete and cor 
tinuOus probability distributions; Central Lirr 
Theorem; point and interval estimation; tests 
hypotheses; simple linear regression and co 
relation. 

MAT 322— Probability & Mathematical 
Statistics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 321 . 

Analysis of variance; nonlinear and multip 
regression; chi-square tests for categoric 
data; nonparametric methods;. Bayesian infe 
ence. This course uses statistical packages 
analyze data sets. 

MAT 336— Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 26 
A survey of topics from Euclidean geometr 

MAT 341-342— Differential Equations I, II 
(5-0-5) 

341 -Winter; 342-Spring. Prerequisite: M/ 
208. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



149 



Ordinary differential equations; series solu- 
)ns; systems of first order differential equa- 
>ns, the Laplace transform; introduction to 
Durier series; partial differential equations; 
urm-Liouville theory; applied problems; nu- 
erical solutions with emphasis on computer 
ded solution. 

AT 346 — Mathematical Modeling and 
ptimization (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 321. 
Design, solution, and interpretation of math- 
natical models of problems in the social, life, 
id management sciences. Topics chosen from 
lear programming, dynamic programming, 
:heduling theory, Markov chains, game theory, 
jeuing theory, inventory theory, and computer 
ised simulation. Various projects are assigned 
nich require computer software packages for 
)lution. 

AT 353— Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 120 or 142. 
Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; sys- 
tis of linear equations; numerical integration 
id numerical solution of differential equations; 
atrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; cal- 
jlation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; 
>undary value problems. 

AT 360— Mathematical Logic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207, 260. 
1 The elementary statement and predicate cal- 
hlus; formal systems; applications of logic in 
lathematics. 

AT 391 — Mathematics for the Elementary 
ihool Teacher (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 and admission to 
>acher Education. 

A study of the mathematics in the elementary 
I jrriculum, with emphasis on appropriate meth- 
Us of teaching for understanding through ac- 
w e involvement of the learner. Frequent use of 
iide range of concrete manipulatives to em- 
3dy concepts in arithmetic of whole numbers 
id fractions and in geometry and measure- 
ent. Directed field experience. (Credit will not 
}ply toward a degree in the mathematical sci- 
ices.) 

AT 393— Teaching of Middle School/ 
eneral Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of college 
lathematics numbered 101 or above and Ad- 
mission to Teacher Education. 

Problems of teaching traditional topics, such 
3 fractions, decimals, percentage, measure- 



ment (especially in the metric system), and in- 
formal geometry. Emphasis on incorporating 
drill and practice in necessary skills with fresh, 
topics like probability and statistics, and with 
appropriate games and laboratory activities. 
(Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

MAT 400— Putnam Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

A variety of mathematical problems, consid- 
ered with the aim of developing problem solving 
techniques. 

MAT 401-402— Advanced Calculus I, II 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

The real number system; sequences; limits of 
functions; the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem; 
compactness; uniform continuity; the derivative; 
the Riemann integral; Euclidean n-space; se- 
quences of functions; the Weierstrass approxi- 
mation theorem; series; elementary functions. 

MAT 406 — Functions of a Complex Variable 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and 
transformations; the Cauchy theory; conformal 
mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 

MAT 416— Theory of Numbers (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260 

Divisibility and congruence; diophantine 
equations; distribution of prime numbers; fa- 
mous unsolved problems; number-theoretic 
functions and their applications; Theorems of 
Fermat and Euler; quadratic reciprocity; se- 
lected topics from algebraic and analytic num- 
ber theory. 

436— Topology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 401. 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms; 
separability; compactness; connectedness; 
completeness; metrizability; introduction to 
homotopy theory. 

MAT 470— History of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, and six quarter hours 
of mathematics courses with course numbers 
greater than 309 

A survey of the development of mathematics 
from its empirical beginnings to its present state. 

MAT 490— Special Topics (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered by special arrangement Prerequi- 
sites: Consent of the instructor and permission 
of the department head. 



150 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Individual readings and research under the 
direction of a member of the mathematics fac- 
ulty. 

MAT 496-497-498-— Internship in 
Mathematics ((0-1 )-(1 2-1 5)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department head. 

Experience, in a variety of mathematical ap- 
plications suited to the educational and profes- 
sional aspirations of the student, under the 
direction of the faculty and appropriate off-cam- 
pus supervisory personnel. (Open to transient 
students only with permission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and that of the appropriate 
official of the college from which the student 
comes.) 



Computer Science Offerings 

CS 115 — Introduction to Computer 
Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: 
MAT 101. 

The study of hardware and software compo- 
nents of computers, elementary programming, 
and the impact of the computer on society. Dis- 
cussion of the capabilities and the limitations of 
computers, and the kinds of problems that are 
best solved by computers. Experience with de- 
veloping and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on the major uses of com- 
puters. This course is designed for the non-com- 
puter science major. It may not be applied as 
part of a language sequence. 

CS 120— Introduction to BASIC 
Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

BASIC programming and program structure; 
elementary logic and Boolean algebra; algo- 
rithms; flow charts; debugging; computer solu- 
tions of numeric and non-numeric problems; 
characteristics and applications of computers in 
modern society. (Credit will not apply toward a 
degree in computer science.) 

CS 136— RPG Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 120 or 142. 

Introduction to the language and program- 
ming applications for small computer systems 
using RPG. 



CS 142 — Introduction to Programming 
Principles with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite 
MAT 101. 

Structured programming; the Pascal pro 
gramming language; basic syntax, input/outpu 1 
debugging, functions and procedures, funda 
mental data types. 

CS 225 — Statistical Programming for the 
Social Sciences (3-4-5) 

Winter (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 220 c 
321 and CS 120 or 142. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, | 
eluding the study of statistical methods, the pre 
gramming of statistical analyses, and dat 
analysis using packaged systems. 

CS 231 — Programming Principles with 
COBOL (4-3-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: CS 142. 

The COBOL programming language: basi 
syntax, input-output, debugging, table-har 
dling, sorting, searching, sequential and rar 
dom file manipulation, structured programmin 
for COBOL; JCL for COBOL programs. 

CS 242 — Advanced Programming Principle 
with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 1C 
and CS 142. 

Advanced programming concepts in Pasc 
recursion, variant records, record-oriented i 
put/output and dynamic structures associate 
with pointers such as linked lists, queues, stacl 
and trees. 

CS 246 — Fortran Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 120 or C 
142. 

Algorithmic processes of computer proble 
solving in a scientific context; elementary log] 
and Boolean algebra; FORTRAN programmir 
language: syntax, arrays, input/output, subro 
tines, functions. 

CS 296 — Computer Literacy for Educators 
(2-3-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 101 and admissk 
to Teacher Education. 

The study of hardware and software comp 
nents of computers, elementary programmin 
and the impact of computers on curriculum. Di 
cussion of the capabilities and limitations 
computers, and the kinds of problems that a 
best solved by computers. Experience with d 
veloping and modifying algorithms to solve su< j 
problems. Emphasis on instructional uses of n 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



151 



rocomputers. This course is designed for the 
on-computer science major. It may not be ap- 
lied as part of a language sequence. 

S 301 — Computer Organization and 
rogramming (4-3-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: CS 231 or CS 242. 

Introduction to systems programming via in- 
nth coverage of assembler programming; op- 
ratmg systems; addressing techniques; 
ternal storage structure; machine-level repre- 
?ntation of instructions and data; subroutines; 
D; linkers and loaders; macro-facilities; mass 
ata storage facilities. 

S 305 — Computer Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 301. 

Hardware and software components of digital 
imputing systems, with emphasis on system 
)ftware and details of hardware organization. 
)pics include system structure, data represen- 
tion, processors, control, storage, input/output 
terrupts and microprogramming. 

5 308— Introduction to File Processing 
-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: CS 231 and CS 

■2 

An introduction to the concepts and tech- 
jques of structuring data on bulk storage de- 
,ces; foundation for applications of data 
ructures and file processing techniques. 

' 3 309— File Processing with COBOL 
' -3-5) 

1 Prerequisite: CS 308. 
COBOL programming techniques for proo- 
fing sequential, indexed (ISAM and VSAM), 
irect and relative files; control language used 
! r the execution of file processing programs; 
iility programs for effective file processing. 

S 312— Algorithms and Data Structures 
i-3-5) 

1 Prerequisites: CS 242, 260, 301 
Internal representation for arrays, queues, 
3es, stacks, graphs, and lists; algorithms for 
e manipulation of data structures; complexity 

nalysis of algorithms; concepts related to the 
teraction between data structures and storage 
ructures for the generating, developing and 

,'ocessing of data; algorithms for memory man- 
jement. 

S 331— Systems Analysis and Design 
i-4-5) 

\ Winter Prerequisite: CS 308 and ENG 344. 
Principles and methodology of structured sys- 



tems analysis and design, including personnel 
and machine requirements, system specifica- 
tions, analysis and design tools and techniques, 
system life cycle management A student proj- 
ect which implements these techniques will be 
required. 

CS 342 — Comparative Languages (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 242, 260, 301. 

Comparative study of programming lan- 
guages including facilities for recursion, pro- 
cedures, storage allocation techniques, string 
processing, and passing of parameters 

CS 346— C' Programming under UNIX (tm) 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 342. 

The 'C programming language: basic syntax, 
types, operators and expressions, statements, 
modular programming, arrays, structures, 
unions and pointers. UNIX (tm) system program- 
ming techniques: I/O forking, pipes, signals, in- 
terrupts. Software tools: macros, conditional 
compilation, passing values to the compiler, lint, 
symbolic debugging, source code control, li- 
braries. 

CS 353— Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; sys- 
tems of linear equations; numerical integration 
and numerical solution of differential equations; 
matrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; cal- 
culation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; 
boundary value problems. 

CS 360— Computer Logic Design (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 260 and 305. 

Theory and design of digital logic systems at 
the gate level. A variety of techniques for the 
reduction of digital circuits will be studied. 

CS 400 — Programming Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisite: CS 242. 

A variety of programming problems, consid- 
ered with the aim of developing problem solving 
techniques. 

CS 401 — Operating System Concepts I 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: CS 312. CS 305. 

Design and analysis of operating systems; 
process management; memory management, 
processor management; auxiliary storage man- 
agement. 



152 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 402— Operating System Concepts II 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 401 and an elementary 
knowledge of 'C. 

Case studies of UNIX and/or similar operating 
systems. 

CS 411— Data Communications and 
Computer Networks (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 305. 

Communications media; codes; data trans- 
mission, multiplexing; protocols; layered net- 
works. 

CS 431— Data Base Systems (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: ENG 344, CS 308, 312. 

Information analysis and logical design of in- 
formation systems and data bases; considera- 
tion of hardware, access methods, 
management, and control functions, communi- 
cating with the data base, and integrated sys- 
tems. 

CS 434 — Introduction to Software 
Engineering (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: CS 31 2, CS 331 , CS 342. 

Principles and techniques of designing and 
developing engineered software, including pro- 
gram structures, design specifications, re- 
source limitations, reliability, correctness, 
debugging, testing, modular program construc- 
tion and user interfaces. A student project which 
implements these techniques will be required. 

CS 445— Compiler Theory (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 312, 342. 

Study of programming language translation 
and basic compiler implementation techniques. 
Formal grammars and languages; specification 
of syntax and semantics; lexical analysis; pars- 
ing; semantic processing. 

CS 490 — Special Topics in Computer 
Science ((0-5)-(0-1 5)-(1 -5)) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and 
permission of the department head. 

Selected topics in some area of current inter- 
est in computer science; possible areas include 
system simulation, graphics, and microcompu- 
ters. 

CS 496-497-498— Internship in Computer 
Science ((0-1 )-(1 2-1 5)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the department head. May not be 
taken concurrently. 

Experience, in a variety of computing envi- 
ronments suited to the educational and profes- 



sional aspirations of the student, under thi 
direction of a member of the faculty and appro 
priate off-campus supervisory personnel. 



Graduate Program and 
Courses 

Coordinator: Dr. Dale Kilhefner 



Objectives 

The Department of Mathematics and Corr 
puter Science, in cooperation with the Schooi c 
Education, offers a program of study leading t 
the degree of Master of Education. The objec 
tives of this program are: 

1 . To enhance the academic and profes- 
sional competence of mathematics 
teachers in secondary schools. 

2. To develop the skills, confidence, en- 
thusiasm, and understanding that 
such teachers need in order to meet • 
the present scientific and technologi- 
cal challenges of modern society. 

3. To acquaint secondary mathematics 
teachers with the various major 
branches of mathematics which are 
relevant to modern secondary math- 
ematics curricula. 

Advisement 

Shortly after being admitted to the MEd d< 
gree program in mathematics, each student w 
be assigned an advisor. Upon notification of th 
assignment, the student should arrange for 
conference and begin planning a degree, pr 
gram. Failure by the student to consult regular 
may greatly lengthen the time necessary to cor 
plete the program. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who wish to transfer graduate crec 
for courses taken at other institutions shou 
note the general limitations and procedures 
this graduate catalog. Such transfer of credit 
handled on an individual basis and requires tf 
written approval of the student's advisor, the d 
partment head, and the appropriate dean. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

During their final quarter, students are r 
quired to pass an oral comprehensive exan 
nation, covering the areas in which they ha 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



153 



.d course work. Students exempting the cal- 
lus or geometry course will be expected to 
:monstrate proficiency in these areas on the 
mprehensive examiantions. Students should 
tify their advisor and the department head, no 
er than midterm of their next-to-final quarter, 
their intention to take the comprehensive ex- 
lination during the following quarter. 
The committee administering this comprehen- 
e examination will consist of three members 
the graduate faculty of the Department of 
ithematics and Computer Science chosen by 
i department head, and one member of the 
aduate faculty of the School of Education cho- 
n by the Department of Secondary Education. 
e department head will notify the student of 
j proposed time, date, and place of the ex- 
lination, and the composition of the commit- 

Students who fail the oral comprehensive ex- 
lination may request to take a written com- 
?hensive examination one time during the 
Tie quarter. Passing the written examination 
I satisfy the comprehensive examination re- 
irement. Students who fail should contact 
Mr advisor to plan remedial action. All com- 
?hensive examinations beyond the first will be 
tten examinations. Student may not take writ- 
i comprehensive examinations twice in con- 
nive quarters. 



IOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
.EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN 
^THEMATICS (with T-5 certification) 

Hours 

Mathematics Courses (not to include 
MAT592) 35 

1. MAT 703 5 

2. MAT 536 or 630 (536 is required 
if student has not taken Euclid- 
ean geometry 5 

3. One course from: MAT 593, 796, 
797 5 

4. Electives (with advisor 
consultation) 20 

Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722, 731, 771 15 

2. EDN 741 5 

Approved Electives (graduate science 
encouraged) 5 

TOTAL 60 

' ecial Note: The requirement for exceptional 
children (EXC 622) must be met either at the 



graduate or undergraduate level. Meeting this 
or any special need will require additional hours 
beyond the basic sixty. 



OFFERINGS 

All graduate MAT courses, with the exception 
of 550, 592, and 593 require at least twenty-five 
hours of college mathematics at or beyond the 
level of calculus, including at least one course 
in which writing of deductive proofs is required. 
Additional prerequisites for some courses ap- 
pear with the course description. 

MAT 521— Probability & Mathematics 
Statistics (5-0-5) 

(See MAT 321 for course description .) 

MAT 536— Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

A survey of topics from Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 546 — Mathematical Modeling and 
Optimization (4-0-4) 

(See MAT 346 for course description.) 

MAT 550 — Principles of Computer Science 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of college mathemat- 
ics. 

BASIC syntax, algorithms, flow diagrams, de- 
bugging. Internal representation of data and in- 
structions, elementary circuits. Programming 
problems and applications for the mathematics 
teacher. 

MAT 553 — Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 120 or 142 or MAT 550. 
(See MAT 353 for course description.) 

MAT 592— Modern Mathematics for 
Elementary Teachers (5-0-5) 

A study of the mathematics content to be 
taught in the elementary school, with emphasis 
on current methods using concrete materials for 
teaching concepts, skills, and problem solving. 
(This course may not be counted as part of the 
35 hour mathematics requirements.) 

MAT 593— Teaching of Middle School/ 
General Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Problems of teaching traditional topics such 
as fractions, decimals, percentage, measure- 
ment (especially in the metric system), and in- 
formal geometry. Emphasis on incorporating 
drill and practice in necessary skills with fresh 
topics like probability and statistics, and with 
appropriate games and laboratory activities. 
Students will become familiar with relevant lit- 
erature by helping to construct a resource list. 



154 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 606 — Functions of a Complex Variable 
(5-0-5) 

(See MAT 406 for course description.) 

MAT 616— Theory of Numbers (5-0-5) 

(See MAT 416 for course description.) 

MAT 630— Transformation Geometry Via the 
Complex Numbers (5-0-5) 

Algebraic operations on the complex num- 
bers and their corresponding geometric inter- 
pretations; a characterization of isometries of the 
complex plane as translations, rotations, reflec- 
tions and guide reflections; a study of isometries 
as groups; similarities; some classic theorems. 

MAT 670— History of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

(See MAT 470 for course description.) 

MAT 695 — Special Topics in Mathematics 
Education (5-0-5) 

Selected topics in an area of mathematics ed- 
ucation. 

MAT 703— Analysis: Calculus in the first 
Three Dimensions (5-0-5) 

A survey of the basic notions of differential 
and integreal calculus for functions in dimen- 
sions one, two, and three. Development of the 
derivative as a linear operator. Special empha- 
sis on application and mathematical modeling. 
Some knowledge of linear algebra is expected. 

MAT 720— Applied Probability (5-0-5) 

Review of elementary probability. Stochastic 
processes, Markov chains, game theory and 
simulation. Several applications are developed 
throughout the course. Some knowledge of el- 
ementary probability is expected. 

MAT 796— Problem Solving (5-0-5) 

Sharpening of problem solving skills; tech- 
niques for teaching problem solving; wide va- 
riety of problem solving strategies illustrated by 
problems, primarily using high school mathe- 
matics content. 

MAT 797— Teaching of Algebra and 
Geometry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: A college geometry course (un- 
dergraduate or graduate). 

Major topics in algebra and geometry (such 
as functions, graphs, inequalities, proofs, con- 
structions) and the problems in teaching them. 
Students will be expected to show mastery of 
the content and will make brief classroom pres- 
entations. 



CS 596 — Computer Literacy for Educators 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra. 

A study of the use of computers, with emphc 
sis on instructional use. Hardware component 
of computers, programming, software evaluc 
tion and the impact of computers on the curric 
ulum. Hands-on experience with the use < 
commercial packages and the creation of ir 
structional software. This course may not b 
counted toward the M.Ed, in Mathematics. 



Psychology 

Faculty 

Martin, Grace, Department Head 

Adams, Joseph 

Douglass, Keith 

John, Beverly 

Lane, Joseph 

Palefsky, Elliot 

Worth ington, C. Stewart 



Students are advised to complete as many c 
the general degree requirements as possibl 
before entering their junior year. Psychology nric 
jors should take PSY 101 and 220 before tr- 
end of their sophomore years. Suggeste 
course distributions and annual schedules ai 
available in the department office. All studen 
are urged to seek advisement with regard 
degree requirements and scheduling. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Houi 

A. General Requirements £ 

Area 1 2 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 1 

2. One course selected from: PHI 
201, 202 

Areall 2 

1. MAT 101 and 195 or 290.... 1' 

2. One of the sequences: CHE 
121, 122, or PHS 121, 122 1i 

Area III c 

1. HIS114or191,115or192,POS 
113 



PSYCHOLOGY 



155 



2. ECO 201 orSOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. BIO 101, 102, MAT 220 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. PSY 101, ANT 201 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

Degree Requirements 65 

1 . PSY 220, 308, 31 2, 41 and 41 1 , 
412or413 25 

2. Recommended selection of 
psychology courses 25 

3. Foreign language or computer 
science sequence 15 

Elective Courses 1 0-25 

1. An appropriate minor or se- 
lected upper division courses .10-25 

Unspecified 20 

Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191-206 



lor Concentrations 

"he Department of Psychology offers minors 
he following five areas: 
\. Psychology— which requires 20 credit 
jrs of upper division work. 
3. Mental Health— which requires PSY 210, 
I 315, 405, 406. 

Z. Organizational Psychology — which re- 
res five of the following: PSY 202, 315, 320, 
1,322, 406. 

). Anthropology — which requires 20 hours of 
Der division anthropology credits, 
i. Sociology— which requires SOC 201 and 
i credit hours of upper division work. 
Ml minor concentrations require a grade of 
' or better in each course taken. 



t thropology Offerings 

* T 201— Humankind & Culture (5-0-5) 

^ach quarter 

"he nature, causes and prospects of being 
hnan A study of the biocultural nature of hu- 
r ns and the development of societies from the 
p'literaure beginnings through the rise of com- 
px organization. 



ANT 202— Human Evolution (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Survey of physical anthropology, including 
the fossil record, living primates, the evolution 
of pre-humans and humans, their ecology and 
cultures. 

ANT/MPS 207— Introduction to Archaeology 
(5-0-5) 

The introductory archaeology course consists 
of a history of the field, basic techniques, the- 
oretical underpinnings, and examples of field 
work from all types of excavation. It covers the 
range from early man to industrial and urban 
archaeology in a general fashion. Analysis is 
introduced along with survey techniques, pres- 
ervation, reporting and other skills. (Identical 
with MPS 207.) 

ANT 305 — Americans Called Indians 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201. 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of 
North America from the Arctic to the Rio Grande 
Study will include origins, distribution, ecology 
and interrelationships, past through present. 

ANT 310 — Anthropology of Sex and Gender 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ANT 201; 

An examination of the cultural determinants of 
sex roles in selected world societies, past and 
present. The foci will be three anthropological 
analyses; economics and status; art and ritual; 
the structure of women's worlds 

ANT 400 — Sorcery, Demons and Gods 
(5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Anthropological analysis of religion as a uni- 
versal category of culture. The supernatural will 
be considered: Mother goddesses myth, sor- 
cery, shamanism, sacrifice and tolemism. Belief 
systems in their sociocultural contexts will be 
emphasized. 

ANT/MPS 401— Fieldwork in Historical 
Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Summer. Prerequisite: MPS 207 or permission 
of instructor or director. 

An introduction to and first application of ar- 
chaeological methods to a specific field project 
Excavation techniques, surveying and map 
making, data collecting and recording, archae- 
ological photography, the identification and 
analysis of artifacts, and the interpretation of ar- 
chaeological data will be presented in field and 
laboratory work as well as in lectures and read- 



156 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ings. (Identical with MPS 401.) (Under certain 
circumstances this course may be substituted 
in the Preservation Studies minor for MPS 498.) 
Course may be repeated for credit. 

ANT/MPS 402— Practicum in Archaeological 
Analysis (2-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or 
director. 

The application of archaeological interpreta- 
tive techniques to a specific site or analytical 
problem. Individual research projects in the 
interpretation of archaeological data and the 
conservation of artifactual finds with special at- 
tention to the care and storage of collections, 
display in the museum setting, and the pres- 
entation of archaeologically-derived informa- 
tion. (Identical with MPS 402.) 

ANT/MPS 403— American Material Culture 
(4-2-5) 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary 
remains of our society, past and present. Ver- 
nacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mor- 
tuary art, community and settlement patterns, 
diet, dress and disease are among the topics 
that will be discussed. 

ANT/MPS 480— Special Topics in 
Archaeology (V-V-[1 -5]) 

Prerequisites: ANT/MPS 207, ANT/MPS 401 
The course is designed to offer a wide variety 
of experience to advanced, upper level students 
in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will 
center on such topics as archaeological graph- 
ics, faunal analysis (zooarchaeology), conser- 
vation, or involve some off-campus 
archaeological experience. 



Psychology Offerings 

PSY 101— General Psychology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, 
and methods of the science of behavior. Dis- 
cussion and demonstrations assist in surveying 
all the areas of psychology. Psychology 101 is 
prerequisite to all other courses in the depart- 
ment. 

PSY 191— Honors General Psychology 
(2-3-5) 

Prerequisites: SAT verbal of at least 550. 

This course may be substituted for PSY 101 
by qualified students. Course content is similar 
to PSY 101, but emphasis is on psychology as 



a laboratory'science. Students will conduct 
variety of experiments and demonstrations ai 
will write research reports on these topics. 

PSY 210— Introduction to Clinical 
Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of behavioral problems, treatme 
modes, and theories. 

PSY 220— Introduction to Psychological 
Research (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An introduction to scientific methodology a 
its application to behavior analysis. Varic 
techniques of data collection and the statistic 
analysis of such data are emphasized. 

PSY 295 — Developmental Psychology 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the origin and development of p: 
chological processes from the life span p 
spective. The effects of genetic/maturatioi 
and socio-cultural/environmental factors on 1 
development of behavior throughout the 
span are included. 

PSY 300— The Psychology of Aging 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An analysis of the aging process as physi 
and biosocial change. Important adaptive 
pects from health to economics will be cons 
efed with an emphasis on maintaining 
optimal quality of life. 

PSY 301— Educational Psychology (5-0-5; 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Offered each quar 
The application of behavioral science to 

problem of learning in the classroom. Prims 

for teacher preparation. 

PSY 302— Psychological Testing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

Survey of individual and group tests in 1 
chological, educational, and clinical settir 
Course focuses on the theoretical and statist 
principles that underlie psychological and 
ucational measurement. Standardized psyc 
logical instruments are critically analyz 
Ethical issues in psychological testing are c 
sidered. 

PSY 303— Social Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as de 
minants of the behavior of the individual, 
cultural milieu and group pressures will be 
amined in terms of their effect on behavior. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



157 



SY 304 — Fundamentals of Counseling and 
sychotherapy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of personality theories and the be- 
ivior changing techniques arising from them. 
ie emphasis will be on learning theory and 
ivironmental influences. 

3Y 306 — Independent Practicum 
-V-[1-10]) 

Prerequisite: 25 hours of psychology. 
Students may be given academic credit for 
pervised community work which meets ap- 
opriate performance criteria. Students will 
;ed prior departmental faculty approval of the 
Drk setting, goals, and supervision. A faculty 
Ivisor will be assigned to support and evaluate 
student's work. 

>Y 307— Perception (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 
An experimental-theoretical approach to the 
ture of perception. Special attention is given 
the psychological method. 

>Y 308 — Learning and Motivation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 
An examination of the methodology and the- 
/ associated with the various forms of learning 
d their motivational concomitants. 

>Y 309 — Physiological Psychology 

•2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101. BIO 101-102. 
Introduction to the biological bases of behav- 
. The structure and function of the nervous 
stem are studied and related to the behavior 
humans and other organisms. 

SY 310— Psychology of Human Sexuality 
I -0-5) 

''Prerequisite: PSY 101. 
I An examination of the developmental, phys- 
ogical, clinical and social aspects of human 
: xuality. The emphasis of the course will be on 
b various components of human sexuality from 
jdevelopmental perspective. 

5Y 311— Theories of Personality (5-0-5) 

'Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

lA study of selected personality theories with 
J iphasis on normal behavior. Attention will be 
J /en to both experimental and clinical data. The 
"termmants of personality structure and the 
'•velopment of personality will be examined 
|>m divergent points of view. 



PSY 312— Measurement (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 220. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. 
Reliability and validity techniques are dis- 
cussed, using current psychological tests as ex- 
amples. 

PSY 315 — Psychology of Conflict and 
Stress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the interactions between physio- 
logical and psychological processes in the de- 
velopment and maintenance of stress related 
disorders. Emphasis is on environmental factors 
and stress management techniques. 

PSY 319— Animal Behavior (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors with 
which living organisms cope effectively with 
their environment. The laboratory will provide an 
introduction to animal care, training, and ex- 
perimentation. 

PSY 320— Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of applications of psychological prin- 
ciples to business and professional settings. In- 
cluded are work motivation, goal setting, power 
politics, leadership and communication. 

PSY 321— Psychology of Work Behavior 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 320. 

A psychological analysis of issues related to 
the individual worker in industry and organiza- 
tions. Included are employee selection, training 
strategies, performance evaluation and job sat- 
isfaction. 

PSY 322— Psychology of Organizational 
Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 320. 

Psychological principles applied to interper- 
sonal and intergroup relations, organizational 
leadership, management of organizational 
change relating to the social environment and 
communication systems. 

PSY 350— Cognitive Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the issues related to the various 
models of human information processing with 
an emphasis on perceptual and linguistic de- 
velopment. Principles and applications derived 
from basic research will be included. 



158 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PSY 405— Behavior Disorders (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the scientific and cultural bases of 
various conceptions of undesirable behavior. 
Application of principles derived from basic re- 
search will be emphasized. 

PSY 406 — Behavior Modification (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of proven methods of generating be- 
havioral change, their empirical foundations and 
their applications in clinical, educational and so- 
cial settings. 

PSY 410 — History and Systems of 
Psychology (5-0-5) 

Open only to psychology majors or by invi- 
tation of the professor. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from 
early animism to modern behavioristics. Special 
attention is given to the philosophical basis at 
various times in the history of psychology. 

PSY 411— Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by 
invitation of the professor. 

A reading and discussion group which will 
concentrate on selected contemporary issues in 
psychology. Specific content will vary from year 
to year. 

PSY 412— Senior Project (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Each student will work with a faculty member 
qualified in the student's area of interest. Work 
is to begin in the first quarter of the senior year 
(register for the quarter of expected comple- 
tion). The student will produce a scholarly paper 
which must be acceptable to the departmental 
faculty. 

PSY 413— Senior Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Students may petition the faculty to receive 
academic credit for an individually designed 
work experience in an applied setting. The spon- 
soring organization must provide a qualified su- 
pervisor. A faculty advisor will establish 
performance criteria and evaluate accordingly. 



Sociology Offerings 

SOC 201— Introductory Sociology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concept and methods 
of the science of human group behavior. In- 
cludes the study of socialization, the role of the 



individual in society, and the major institutioi 
and processes. It is designed to provide a bett 
understanding of American culture and the wic 
range of social phenomena. 

SOC 315— The Family and Alternative 
Lifestyles (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

A study of the role of the family in the devi 
opment of the individual, the family unit and s 
cietal institutions. Consideration will be given 
various structures and functions of the family 
it exists or is emerging in America. 

SOC 320— Ethnic Minorities (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

This course focuses on the present facti 
situation in America. The course examines t 
problems faced by minorities in America, E 
pecially where skin color and language po 
social and economic barriers. It looks at dor 
nant public institutions and patterns of respon 
by minorities such as Black Americans, Chic 
nos, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and otr 
sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOC 333 — Exploring Popular Culture 
(4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

An examination of popular culture using rr 
sic, radio, television, texts, magazines, movi 
technology and language to explore a given e 
Comparisons will be made of lifestyles, 
roles, racial attitudes and the national regio 
mood of times examined. 

SOC 340— Methods of Social Research 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course will explore several methods 
applied social research including case stud 
record research, experimental designs, 
veys, observation and systems interaction 
they apply to social data. The student must d< 
onstrate a working knowledge of each met! 
in the context of social work practice. 

SOC 350— Social Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201 . 

An examination of behavioral deviancy, 
mative strain, and differences between sc 
ideals and social realities in the context of 
ciological theory. 

SOC 430— Alcohol and Drug Studies 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A course focusing on the various forms c 

cohol and drug abuse with emphasis on 1 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



159 



ages of harmful dependence and addiction. 
3re will be an examination of the legal and 
cial implications of addiction as well as ap- 
oaches to treatment and rehabilitation. 

)C 450— Independent Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on de- 
ind. Open to transient students only with per- 
ssion of the Dean of Arts, Sciences and 
ucation at Armstrong. 



EACHER EDUCATION 
30GRAMS 

Stipulations affecting the undergraduate 
cher education programs at Armstrong State 
liege are contained in this section and in the 
owing section devoted to the Department of 
jcation. Stipulations regarding graduate pro- 
ims m education are contained in the grad- 
e section of this catalog, 
'he teacher education programs at Arm- 
)ng State College are accredited by the Na- 
lal Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
jcation and are approved by the Georgia 
te Department of Education. Upon verifica- 
i by the College that a student has success- 
y completed an approved program, the 
dent applies to the State Department of Ed- 
ition for the appropriate teaching certificate. 
'he stipulations for teacher education pro- 
ms apply to all students in all teacher edu- 
ion programs at Armstrong State College. 

idemic Advisement 

•tudents desiring to pursue a teacher edu- 
ion program should seek academic advise- 
nt in the Department of Education during their 
l' quarter of residence. These students should 
pw without deviation the approved programs 
jitudy when these programs are established 
ithem by their advisors. Upon admission to 
! teacher education program, a student will 
assigned an advisor in the Department of 
jcation. 

advisors will assist the students in processing 
specific form establishing the programs of 
Jy for the appropriate majors. These forms 
1 the completed programs of study will be 
J with the advisors and copies given to the 
dents 



I "Mission to Teacher Education 

: student wishing to pursue a teacher edu- 
^on program leading to teacher certification 



must apply for admission to the teacher edu- 
cation program. This application will be filed nor- 
mally during the second quarter of the 
sophomore year or, for transfer students, in the 
first quarter of the junior year. Application forms 
may be secured from the Department of 
Education. 

The following criteria apply for admission to 
the teacher education program: 

1 . Completion of at least 60 quarter hours 
of college credit with a minimum 2.5 
(unrounded) GPA. 

2. Completion of EDN 200 and ENG 101, 
102, and 201 or their equivalents, with 
a "C" or better in each course. 

3. Competence in oral and written 
expression. 

4. Indication of desirable attitude, char- 
acter, and teaching potential. 

5. Statement of good health signed by a 
licensed physician. 

6. Satisfactory completion of the Re- 
gents' Test. Students already holding 
baccalaureate degrees from an ac- 
credited institution are exempted from 
the Regents' Test. 

7. Submission of four letters of recom- 
mendation; such letters may be se- 
cured from colleges or universities 
where applicants may have been pre- 
viously enrolled. 

8. Submission of an up-to-date copy of 
the program of study planning sheet. 

A student who does not meet requirement 1 
above may seek to be admitted on the basis of 
at least 75 quarter hours of credit specifically 
included in the student's program of study, with 
a GPA of at least 2.75 on that work. 

Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certifi- 
cate, a student must complete the degree re- 
quirements for an approved teacher certification 
program of Armstrong State College and must 
complete at Armstrong State College a majority 
of the courses in each of the following areas: 
the professional sequence, the teaching field, 
and the related field. 

Liability Insurance Requirement 

All students who participate in courses for 
which field experiences (i.e.. laboratory practi- 
cum) are required must provide evidence of li- 
ability insurance (i.e.. SGAE membership or 
must sign a waiver of insurance coverage). Stu- 
dents should consult advisors regarding this re- 
quirement. 



160 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is 
to provide an opportunity for future teachers (1 ) 
to learn what teachers do at the beginning of a 
new school term, (2) to participate in experi- 
ences that will assist the prospective teacher 
with future decisions concerning teaching as a 
career, and (3) to become acquainted with the 
organization and curriculum of a particular 
school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the 
first two weeks of the public school term (usually 
in late August and early September) and should 
be scheduled during the student's junior or sen- 
ior year. No credit is given for the September 
Practicum, but it is a requirement in all of the 
teaching fields in the Armstrong State College 
Teacher Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum 
should be made during the first week of the 
Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the 
forthcoming September. The student should 
contact the Director of Professional Laboratory 
Experiences. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of 
the professional sequence, is provided in se- 
lected off-campus school centers. The full 
quarter of student teaching is arranged coop- 
eratively by the college, the participating 
schools, and supervising teachers. Completed 
applications for admission to student teaching 
must be submitted to the Director of Professional 
Laboratory Experiences during the first week of 
the quarter preceding student teaching. While 
student teaching, the student is required to ad- 
here to established policies and procedures of 
the cooperating school system in addition to 
those policies and procedures established by 
the college. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at 
the time assignment is made. While student pref- 
erences and other personal circumstances are 
considered, the college reserves the right to ex- 
ercise its discretion in placement. The student 
will receive a letter of assignment. Orientation to 
student teaching will be held during the first sev- 
eral days of the quarter in which student teach- 
ing is scheduled. The following requirements 
must be met before a student can enroll in stu- 
dent teaching: 

1. Completion of the core curriculum. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education. 

3. Completion of all teaching field courses. 



4. Satisfactory completion of the Septemt 
Practicum and the Regents' Exam. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Media Co 
petency Exam or EDN 240. 

6. Have at least senior status. 

7. Havea 2.5 average on all courses 
tempted, and "C" or better in all cours 
acceptable toward the teching field, pro 
sional sequence, concentration, and 
lated electives. 

8. Be endorsed by four aproved full tii 
members of the faculty, one of whom mi 
be the student's advisor. 

Students who are completing requiremei 
for certification as outlined in a State [ 
partment of Education Letter and are 
questing a student teaching assignnm 
must have a minimum, 2.5 GPA and be 
good academic standing. 
A student will not be permitted to take ad 
tional courses during student teaching. Studi 
teachers are not permitted to teach in a sch> 
in which their children are enrolled. 

Program Completion 

A student must complete the college's < 
proved program for certification within the i 
years following admission to the Teacher B 
cation program. In the event that the stud 
does not complete the program in four ye; 
the individual must meet the requirements of 
program in effect at that time. 

For acceptable completion, each course 
the teaching field, professional education 
quence concentration, and related fields rr 
be passed with a "C" or better grade. 

Cooperative Programs 

Savannah State College cooperates with Ai 
strong State College in offering majors in: 
Industrial Arts Education, (2) Trade and ln<J 
trial Education, and (3) Business Educal, 
Coursework in the major field of study for e 
of these programs is offered by Savannah Stj 
Students interested in these programs sh< 
contact the head of the Department of Educcf 
at Armstrong State College. 

Minor Concentration 

A minor in teacher education is availabk 
students who do not wish to earn teacher 
tif ication . The minor incorporates courses w) 
address leading concepts and problems id 
field of education. Students majoring in gerj 
studies, psychology, health science, and d 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



161 



js may find this minor a valuable adjunct to 
ir programs of study. For the minor to be of- 
ally recognized, all courses in the minor must 
passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

N 200 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

2 310 - Introduction to Exceptional 

Children 5 

N 302 - or PSY 301 - Educational 

Psychology 5 

N 240 - Educational Media 2 

296 - Computer Literacy for 

Educators 3 

e additional upper 

divisional education course 5 

(Illustrative courses include library 
media courses, EDN courses 
and EXC courses.) 
Total 25 



partment of Education 



ulty 

:ant, Department Head 
yekum, Stephen 
derson Donald 
II, A. Patricia 
ttiste, Bettye Anne 
rgess, Clifford 
chran, John 
ndy, Evelyn 
Noway, Herbert 
rwood, Pamela 
wberry, Lloyd 
•phens, Jacquelyn 
j nipseed, Patricia 
! ite, Susan 

iiduate Faculty 



(sociate Program 

OGRAM FOR THE DEGREE 
^ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN EARLY 
:«LDHOOD EDUCATION 

Hours 

General Requirements 49 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101 and 102 or 192 

Area II 10 

1 MAT 101 5 

2 One course from: BIO 101 or 
102.CHE121 or122orPHY211 

or 212 or PHY SCI 121 or 122 . 5 



Area III 10 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POL SCI 113 5 

ArealV 15 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. EDN 200, 202, EDN 240 10 

Area V 4 

1. PE 117 2 

2 PE 166 2 

Restricted Electives (Select 2) 10 

AreaVI 10 

1. ART 200, 271, 272, 273 5 

2. MUS200or PHI 201 5 

3. ENG 201 or 222 5 

4. HIS 114 or 115 5 

5. BIO 101 or 102 5 

6. CHE 121 or 122 5 

7. PHY 211 or 212 5 

8. PHS 121 or 122 5 

9. MAT 103, 195, 220 or 290 5 

10. ECO 201 or 202 or SOC 201... 5 

11. GEO 211 or212 5 

12. DRS228 5 

Major Field Courses 30 

Area VII 30 

1. ECE 248, 244, 226, 224, 222, 
235 

Major Field Electives 6-8 

1. ECE 232, 234 3 

ECE246 5 

2. LS 110 1 

3. CS296 3 

Regents Examinations 

TOTAL 95-97 



Bachelor Programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN EARLY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1 MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 

or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 

sequence 10 



162 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

ArealV , 28 

1. EDN 200, 202 8 

2. DRS228, PSY 101 10 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and GEO 21 1 or 
212 10 

AreaV 5 

1. EDN 240 2 

2. CS296 3 

AreaVI 8 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117, 166 5 

2. Activity courses 3 

B. Specialized Content Courses 48 

1. ART 320, MAT 391; MUS 320.. 15 

2. PE320 3 

3. EDN 324, 336, 342, 422, 424, 
434 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EXC 310, EDN 304, 432, 436, 
471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 5 

D. Electives 2-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191-194 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 
or290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 



ArealV J 

1. GEO 211 or212and HIS 251 or 
252 " 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101, EDN 200... 

3. EDN 240, CS296 

AreaV 

1. ' PE 103 or 108; 117 

2. Three activity courses 

B. Concentration I Courses i 

Language arts, mathematics, 
science, or social sciences 

C. Concentration II Courses 

Health and physical education, 
language arts, mathematics, 
music, science, social sci- 
ences, or art 

D. Specialized Courses 

CONTENT COURSES REQUIRED 
AND/OR APPROPRIATE FOR CON- 
CENTRATION CHOICES: 20 hours 
minimum; 30 hours maximum 20- 

1. EDN 336, 342, 422, 428, 434... 

2. MAT 391 or 393 

E. Professional Sequence 

1. EXC 310; EDN 304, 438, 450. 
471, 472, 473 ,-. 

2. PSY 301 or EDU 302 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 

TOTAL 1 

. 1 — , — 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION, 
WITH A MAJOR IN SPEECH CORRECTIO* 

Ho» 

A. General Requirements 

Area I 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 201 

Area II :'. 

1. MAT 101 and 290 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 

Area III 

1. HIS 114or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 

2. ANT 201 or ECO 201 or SOC 
201 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



163 



ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101, 202 15 

2. EXC 220; HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

I Teaching Concentration 50 

1. EXC 225, 230, 315, 335 20 

2. EXC 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 

420 30 

J Courses Related to Concentration 15 

PSY405 5 

EDN 304 or PSY 295 5 

Approved elective 5 

' Professional Sequence 35 

1. PSY 301 or EDN 302, EXC 310 10 

2. EDN 335, 422, 471, 472, 473... 25 
. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



OGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
CHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
CONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
ACHING FIELD OF ART EDUCATION 

Hours 

General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

A'ealV 30 

1 EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. ART 111, 112, 201, 213 20 

AreaV 6 

1 PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



B. Teaching Concentration 58-63 

1. ART 202, 204 10 

2. ART 271, 272, 273** 10-15 

3. ART 313, 330, 340, 350, 351, 

370 30 

4. One course from: ART 314, 362, 
363 5 

5. ART 400 3 

C. Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 471, 472, 

473 25 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302 5 

D. Electives 0-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194 
**May not be duplicated in Area I. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BIOLOGY 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192. 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 206 or 

220 10 

2. BIO 101, 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191 , 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201. 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. CHE 128, BOT 203. ZOO 204 15 
3 One course from: ART 200. 271 

272, 273; DRS 228: MUS 200 5 

AreaV. 6 

1. PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2 Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



164 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Teaching Concentration 45 

1. BIO 370, 480 and BOT 410 or 
ZOO410 15 

2. BOT or ZOO courses numbered 
300+ 10 

3. CHE 129,341, 342, 343 20 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 15 

Three of the following: AST 201 , 
GEL 201, MET 201, and OCE 

301 or 430 15 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 
472,473 30 

2. PSY301 or EDN 302 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF BUSINESS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 106 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, 201 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 ; or 
ENG 222 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115, POS 113, ECO 

201 20 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101, DRS 228, 

BAD 201, ACC211, ACC 212.. 30 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

Other Requirements 10 

1. MAT 220, HIS 251 or 252 10 

B. Teaching Concentration 59 

1. BAD 225, ECO 202 10 

2. ADS 202, ADS 340, ADS 405, 
ADS420 19 

3. BAD 302, BAD 317, BAD 320, 
BAD 340, BAD 360, BAD 462 .. 30 



C. Professional Sequence 3' 

1 . EDN 240, EDN 302 or PSY 301 

2. EXC 310, EDN 335, BED 350... 1 

3. EDN 471, 472, 473 1 

E. Regents' and Exit Exams 

Total 20 

F. Secretarial Concentration 21 

1. ADS 203, ADS 312, ADS 313... 1 

Total 21 

Special Note: ACC (Accounting), OAD (Offic 
Administration), BAD (Business Administration 
and BE (Business Education) courses taught c 
SSC only. 

Courses taken in Area I may not be duplicate 
in Area IV. 

Prerequisites for admission to ADS 202 and AD 
312 - Skill in typewriting and shorthand at ele 
mentary level. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION II 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF CHEMISTRY 
EDUCATION 

How 

A. General Requirements 1( 

Area I , 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 

■ 2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 

Area II 

1. MAT 101, 103 

2. CHE 128, 129 

Area III 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191 , 115or192;POS 
113 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 

ArealV 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 

2. BIO 101, 102; CHE 281 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 

AreaV 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 

2. Three activity courses 

State Requirement 

HIS 251 or 252 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



165 



3. Teaching Concentration 35 

1. CHE 341, 342, 343, 350, 380... 22 

2. CHE 491, 497 8 

3. CHE 451 or 461 or 480 5 

1 Courses Related to Concentration 25 

1. PHS211, 212, 213or217, 218, 
219 15 

2. BOT203, MAT 206 10 

). Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 
472, 473 30 

2. PSY301 or EDN 302 5 

1 Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



6. One course from: ENG 327 or 
328, 400, 401, 402, 490 or 491 
(Neither ENG 327 nor 328 may 
be duplicated to satisfy B-2 
above, although both may be 

taken) 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 15 

1. PHI 400 or approved elective... 5 

2. DRS350or351 5 

3. EDN 423 5 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 422 15 

2. EDN 439, 471, 472, 473 20 

3. PSY301 or EDN 302 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



tOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
VCHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
.CONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
ACHING FIELD OF ENGLISH 
JUCATION 

Hours 

. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 

290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. DRS228; EDN 200, PSY 101 ... 15 

2. Foreign language sequence 
through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Teaching Concentration 40 

1. ENG 326, 344; 406 or 407 15 

2 ENG 327 or 328 5 

3. One course from: ENG 300, 
302, 304, 305, 306, 307, 320 ... 5 

4. One course from: ENG 308, 
309, 310 5 

5. One course from: ENG 325, 
410, 422 5 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101. 102 or 191, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 10 

2. CHE 128, 129 or PHY 211, 212 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. ECO 201 or 202 5 

ArealV 30 

1. DRS 228, EDN 200, PSY 101 15 

2. IAE201, 202, 203 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 45 

1. IAE 301, 302, 303, 312, 401 25 

2. METc212. 213 10 

3. ETc 101, 102 10 



166 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EXC310, 335 10 

2. PSY 301 or EDN 302; EDN 471 , 
472, 473 20 

3. IAE411, 412 10 

D. Approved Electives 10 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: IAE (Industrial Arts Education), 
METc (Mechanical Engineering Technology), 
and ETc (Engineering Technology) courses 
taught at SSC only. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF MATHEMATICS 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. MAT 206, 207, 208 15 

3. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; 
MUS200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 40 

1. CS 120. 5 

2. MAT 220, 260, 311, 336 19 

3. Two courses from: MAT 316, 
416, 470 6-7 



4. Two courses from: MAT 341, 
346, 353 4- 

5. Approved MAT/CS elective 4- 

C. Professional Sequence 3 

1. EXC310, EDN 335, 441 1 

2. EDN 471, 472, 473 1 

3. ' PSY 301 or EDN 302 

D. Electives 1 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 19 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION I 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

How 

A. General Requirements 1C 

Area I ." f 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 191, 201 or 
292 1 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

phi 200, 201 '.: 

Area II 

1. MAT 101, 290 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 

Area III ' 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 

2. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 ..... 

ArealV 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 

2. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140, 236, 
281 

AreaV '.. 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 

2. Three activity courses 

State Requirement 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Teaching Concentration .65 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 237, 238, 
239 

2. MUS 240, 340 

3. MUS 312, 330, 331 

4. MUS 361, 371, 372, 373, 412.. 

5. One of the following 

emphases: 11 1 

a. Choral— MUS 353, 313, 423, 

480 and 314 or 315 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



167 



b. Instrumental — 
MUS227, 352, 416, 424, 

481 12 

c. Keyboard- -MUS 227, 425, 
420 or 421, 423 or 424, 353 

or352 12 

MUS480or481 3 

1 Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC310, EDN 335, 471, 472, 

473 25 

2. PSY301 or EDN 302 5 

). Recital Requirement (one-half of a 

senior recital) 

TOTAL 196-199 



ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
ECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
EACHING FIELD OF PHYSICS EDUCATION 

Hours 

, General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 191, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200.. 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. PHY 211-212 or 217-218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HiS 114or 191. 115or192:POS 
113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. One course from: ART 200. 271. 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 5 

3. PHY 213 or 219: BIO 101, 102 15 
Area V 6 

1. PE 103or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

Teaching Concentration 30 

1. AST301 5 

'2. PHY 380. 412, 417 15 

3. Two courses from: GEL 302. 
MET 303; OCE 301. 430 10 

Courses Related to Concentration 30 

1. CHE 128, 129, 281 15 

2. MAT 206, 207 10 



3. Approved 300+ CHE elective 5 

D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 302 or PSY 301 10 

2. EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 ' 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL STUDIES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BROAD 
FIELDS (HISTORY) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114or 191. 115or192:POS 
113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN200 5 

2. One course from: ANT 201. 
ECO 201, GEO 212. SOC 201 5 

3. One course from: ART 200. 271, 
272. 273; DRS 228; MUS 200.. 5 

4. Approved language 

sequence through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252; HIS 371 or 

377 10 

2. HIS300 5 

3. Approved Non-Western HIS 
course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ US HIS 

course 5 

5 Approved European HIS 

course(s) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 30 

1. ECO 201. 202. 363 10-15 

2 GEO 211. 212. elective 10-15 

3 POS 306 or 307 5 

4 POS 317, 318. 416 or 417 5-10 



168 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



D. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC310, EDN335, 449 15 

2. EDN 302 or PSY 301 ; EDN 471 , 
472, 473 , 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



D. Professional sequence 

1 . EXC 31 0, EDN 302 or PSY 301 

2. EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473... 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 1 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL STUDIES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN BROAD 
FIELDS (POLITICAL SCIENCE) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Areall 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201; 
ECO 201 , 202; any GEO course; 
SOC201 5 

4. Approved language 

sequence through 103 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 30 

1. POS 306 or 307; 346 or 349 10 

2 POS 329, 333 10 

3. One course from: POS 31 7, 31 8, 
416, 417 5 

4. Approved 300+ POS course... 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Courses from three of the follow- 
ing: 

a. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

b. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

c. 300+ HIS electives 10-15 

d. ANT, PSY, SOC electives ...10-15 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
WITH A CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 

Hoi 

A. General Requirements 

Area I 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 
292 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 
PHI 200, 201 

Area II 

1. MAT 101, 220 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence -.V. 

Area III .;. 

1. HIS114or191,115or192;POS 
113 

2. SOC 201 

ArealV ' 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200.. 

3. Approved language 
sequence through 103 

AreaV , 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 '.'. 

2. Three activity courses 

B. Teaching Concentration 

1. HIS 251, 252, 300 

2. Approved Non-Western HIS 
courses 

3. Approved 300+ US HIS 
course(s) ..J 

4. Approved 300+ European HIS 
course(s) i 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 

1. ECO 201, GEO 211 

2. One course from: ANT 201 ; POS 
306, 307, 317 

3. Approved social science 
elective 

D. Elective 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



169 



E. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 449 15 

2. EDN 302 or PSY 301; EDN 481, 
482, 483 20 

F. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 

ACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
ECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
EACHING FIELD OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
'ITH A CONCENTRATION IN POLITICAL 
CIENCE 

Hours 

General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

' 1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 

272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191 , 1 15or 192: POS 
113 15 

2. SOC201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101 10 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 .. 5 

3. Approved electives 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

Teaching Concentration 40 

1. POS 306, 307. 329 15 

2. POS 31 6 or 31 8; 346 or 349; 331 
or332 15 

3. Approved 300+ POS electives 10 
Courses Related to Concentration 20 

HIS 251, 252; GEO 211; ECO 

201 20 

Elective 5 

Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310. EDN 335, 449 15 

2 EDN 302 or PSY 301 ; EDN 471 , 

472,473 20 

Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE 
TEACHING FIELD OF TRADE AND 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272, 273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 200, 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 10 

2. CHE 128, 129 or PHY 211, 212 10 
Area III 20 

1. HIS 1 14 or 191 , 115or192;POS 
113 15 

2. ECO 201 or 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. DRS 228, EDN 200, PSY 101 ... 15 

2. TIE 100, 200, 210 15 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108. 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 45 

1. TIE 300, 301, 303. 323 or 410.. 20 

2. TIE 311. 313, 401, 402. 403 or 
technical electives 25 

C. Professional Sequence 40 

1 . EDN 335; PSY 301 or EDN 302: 
EXC 310 15 

2. TIE 411. 421 10 

3. EDN 471, 472, 473 or TIE 431 
432. 433 15 

D. Approved Electives 10 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations ... 

TOTAL 196 
Special Note: TIE (Trade and Industrial Educa- 
tion) courses taught at SSC only. 



170 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Library Science/Media 

The Library Science/Media program has three 
emphases: (1) basic library skills courses and 
specialized skill courses designed to help stu- 
dents in specific subject areas develop re- 
search skills; (2) career courses for prospective 
media specialists and persons interested in 
public and special libraries; and (3) basic re- 
search courses which may be elected by majors 
in other areas. 

Certification Program 

Certification in Library Media may be obtained 
by completing 40 quarter hours in media and 
related courses with grades of "C" or better. This 
program must be incorporated into an existing 
teaching major. The following courses are re- 
quired for certification as a media specialist: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 

425 25 

B. EDN240, 451; CS 296 10 

C. One course from: EDN 324, 41 8; 
EDN423 5 

Non-Certification Program 

A student may choose any field of concentra- 
tion which allows a double major. The major in 
Library Media is comprised of the following: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 

425 25 

EDN 240, 451; CS 296 

or 115 10-12 

B. One course from: EDN 324, 41 8; 
EDN 423; DRS/JRN 347 5 

TOTAL 40-42 

Library Media Minor 

A student choosing to minor in Library Media 
is required to complete the following courses 
with grades of "C" or better in each: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320 12 

B. LM 410, 420, 425 _13 

TOTAL 25 

Learning Disabilities Add-On 

Learning Disabilities (grades K-12) may be 
added to certification in elementary or middle 
school education by successful completion of 
the following courses: 



EXC 312 - Introduction to Learning 

Disabilities 
EXC 430 - Teaching Children with 

Disabilities 
EXC 340 - Behavior Management 
EDN 320 - Tests and Measurements 
EXC 315 - Language Development 
Secondary education students and students ir 
terested in an endorsement in Learning Disc 
bilities need to see a Special Education advise 
in the Office of Secondary Education and Spt 
cial Education in order to identify the appropriat 
courses. 

The above "add-on" in LD would consist of 
non-renewable provisional certificate at the T- 
level in Learning Disabilities. In order for the sti 
dent to obtain a non-provisional certificate, othe 
requirements, outlined by the State Departmei 
of Education would have to be satisfied. 



SPECIAL NOTE: 
1 . Liability insurance or waiver is required fc 
all courses with field experiences. Pleas 
consult course outline or professor regarc 
ing this requirement. 



Course Offerings 



ECE Offerings 

ECE 222— The Reading Process for Early 
Childhood Education (5-0-5) 

The study of beginning reading readiness a 
language arts development. Special empha:. 1 
on strategies for teaching prerequisite skills 
rectly related to the formal reading program. 

ECE 224 — Mathematics and Science for 
Young Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Topics include development of whole numt 
integers and rational numbers: arithmetic a 
geometric relations. Study of integrating scien 
concepts, principles , and processes into t 
teaching of science for the young child. E 
phasis on strategies and media used to tea 
mathematics and science in early years. 

ECE 226— Lan uage Arts for Early 
Childhood Education (5-0-5) 

Selecting and reading appropriate books f 
the pre-school child with special emphasis 
picture books, reading aloud, story-telling tec 
niques, drama and role playing. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



171 



ECE 232— Tests and Measurements in Early 
Childhood Education (3-0-3) 

A job related introductory course which will 
:urvey group readiness, developmental psy- 
:hological, and achievement tests commonly 
;mployed at the preschool and primary levels. 
Jasic descriptive statistics and interpretative 
.kills will be emphasized. Students will be pro- 
ided opportunities to administer and interpret 

9StS. 

ICE 234 — Classroom Management and 
Jiscipline (3-0-3) 

This course is designed to help the early child- 
iood teacher determine performance levels and 
istructional needs of children as these factors 
slate to effective and positive classroom man- 
igement techniques. 

ICE 235 — Expressive Activities in Early 
Childhood Education (5-0-5) 

The fundamentals and emphasis on the place 
if music, drama, movement, creative activities 
md art in the education of young children. De- 
igning materials and demonstrating strategies 
Dr guiding children in the expressive activities. 

:CE 244 — Curriculum and Implementation 
5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EDN 224 and ECE 222. 

The study of approaches to curriculum de- 
velopment and implications for instructional 
trategies. This course places special focus on 
le development of instructional units, writing of 
>bjectives, organization of learning centers, and 
Bsson and unit planning. Includes current 
rends in early childhood curriculum design. 

ECE 246 — Supervision and Administration 
5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECE 244. 

Study of principles and practices of personnel 
nanagement, emphasizing human relations. 
Imphasis will be placed on budget preparation, 
)rganizational structure, license requirements 
ind program evaluation. 

ECE 248 — Growth and Development of the 
foung Child (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the study of child devel- 
)pment — social, emotional, physiological and 
ntellectual. Includes parent-child, parent- 
eacher relationships and multi-cultural factors 
vhich affect children and their families. Focuses 
)n development from conception through eight 
vears with special emphasis on factors which 
Contribute to individual differences, and influ- 
ences of educational practices upon develop- 
ment. 



ECE 252 — Practicum in Nursery- 
Kindergarten Education (2-8-3) 

Field experience during which the student 
with no teaching experience and/or not working 
in an early childhood education related job, will 
observe and become involved in the teaching/ 
learning processes at each of the levels of early 
childhood education (nursery and kindergar- 
ten). Scheduled seminars. 



EDN Offerings 

EDN 200— Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5) 

The study of the status of education and of 
teaching as a profession. The student engages 
in directed self-study and plans for the achieve- 
ment of professional goals. Directed field ex- 
periences. 

EDN 202— Health and the Young Child 
(3-0-3) 

Study of factors impacting upon the physical 
social and emotion I health of young children, 
including food and nutrition, safety, disease and 
trauma. 

EDN 240— Education Media (1-2-2) 

Workshop experience in the selection, utili- 
zation, evaluation, and preparation of various 
kinds of media. Emphasis is placed on utilization 
of media in teaching. 

EDN 302— Educaitonal Psychology (5-0-5) 

A study of the learning processes and the 
factors that impinge upon the learner. Special 
consideration is given to the methods and tools 
used in the assessment and evaluation of learn- 
ing. 

EDN 304 — Human Growth and Learning 
(4-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

Focus on total growth and development of in- 
dividuals with emphasis upon interrelationships 
of the development process and teaching-learn- 
ing. Labo atory Component includes use of cam- 
pus, school and community resources for 
observing-participatmg, testing, and synthesiz- 
ing course theory. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 320— Test and Measurements (5-0-5) 

A beginning course in measurement which 
covers statistical methods, research designs 
and research problems. Students are provided 
experiences in the administration and evaluation 
of psychological tests. 



172 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDN 324— Literature for Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

A study of children's books and selections 
from books. Designed to assist future teachers 
in the selection of the best that has been written 
in the realm of children's literature for each pe- 
riod of the child's life. 

EDN 335— Secondary School Curriculum 
and Methods, General (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion; PSY 301 or EDN 302. 

The study of secondary school curriculum and 
methods. Detailed study is given to techniques 
of systematic observation, preparation of be- 
havioral objectives, analysis of critical incidents, 
production of media materials, practices of 
classroom control, and examination of instruc- 
tion models. Directed practicum. 

EDN 336— Elementary School Language 
Arts (5-5-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Designed to offer the student the opportunity 
to explore methods, content, and materials used 
in teaching the skills of communicative arts to 
children. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 342— Elementary School Social 
Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Focus upon fundamental social studies skills 
and processes needed by children. Directed 
field experiences. 

EDN 410— Independent Study (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Students conduct an in-depth, closely super- 
vised instructor-approved study of a topic in ed- 
ucation. The student is required to evidence 
skills in independent research and study. 

EDN 415 — Adolescent Psychology (5-0-5) 

Focus on the phenomenon of modern ado- 
lescence. Emphasis upon the intellectual, cul- 
tural and personal transitions of the adolescent 
period. 

EDN 418— Literature for the Middle School 
Learner (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion. 

Provides opportunity for prospective and in- 
service teachers to explore multimedia offerings 



of literary value and of significance to age lew 
of learners found in the middle school. Relate 
literature to all areas of the middle school cui 
riculum. 

EDN 422— The Teaching of Reading 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa 
tion. 

Study of the developmental reading prograrr 
Emphasis will be placed on reading skills, ap 
proaches, techniques, materials and evaluatioi 
for classroom use. 

EDN 423— Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Admissio 
to Teacher Education. 

EDN 424 — Practicum in Individual Reading 
Instruction (2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422. 

Designed to provide prospective teacher 
with directed practice in the teaching of reading 
Special em hasis will be placed upon diagnosi 
and teaching of needed reading skills. Student 
will be required to tutor at least one remedic 
reader. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 428— Reading in the Middle School 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educe 
tion. 

Primary focus upon reading as a tool for e: 
tending learning in the content areas of the mk 
die school. 

EDN 430 — Diagnosing and Prescribing for 
Learning Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422 or 428. 

Diagnostic and prescriptive process princ 
pies underlying assessment and correction 
learning problems. Designed to help the clas 
room teacher (1) determine performance leve 
and needs of pupils and (2) provide effectk 
learning assistance. 

EDN 432— Methods and Materials for K-4 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Educ. 
tion. 

Examination of teaching resources, teachir 
strategies and the range of interpersonal rel. 
tionships involved in teaching young childre 
Directed field experiences. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



173 



DN 434 — Methods and Curriculum of 
lementary Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
Dn. 

Interpretation of science for elementary 
3hool teaching: exploration of processes for 
anslating meaning into classroom practice, 
mphasis upon inquiry, the discovery process 
nd other science teaching strategies. 

DN 436 — Curriculum and Teaching K-4 
i-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
XI. 

This course is the study of early elementary 
jrricula, existing administrative and instruc- 
)nal organizations, evaluation procedures, and 
<periences in curriculum at the primary level 
C-4). It includes study and development of 
saching materials. Directed field experience. 

DN 438 — Curriculum and Teaching (4-8) 
i-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
:>n 

This course is the study of Middle School cur- 
Dula, existing administrative and instructional 
'ganizations, evaluation procedures, and ex- 
eriences in curriculum at the middle school 
•vel (4-8). It includes study and development 
f teaching materials. Directed field experi- 
rjces. 

DN 439 — Secondary School Curriculum 
nd Methods, English (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: PSY 301 or 
DN 302 and admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English cur- 
: culum with emphasis upon materials and meth- 
Ids of teaching English. Directed observation. 

DN 441 — Secondary School Curriculum 
nd Methods, Mathematics (5-0-5) 

' Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MAT 260. 
The study of secondary school mathematics 
urnculum with emphasis upon materials and 
lethods of teaching mathematics. Directed ob- 

tervations. 

DN 445 — Reading in the Secondary 
school (5-0-5) 

' This course is designed to provide students 
/ith the rationale for teaching reading as they 
?ach their content areas in the secondary 
chool. 



EDN 447 — Secondary School Curriculum 
and Methods, Science (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Admission 
to Teacher Education, PSY 301 or EDN 302, and 
EDN 335. 

The study of secondary school science cur- 
riculum with emphasis upon materials and meth- 
ods of teaching science. Directed observations. 

EDN 449 — Secondary School Curriculum 
and Methods, Social Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
tion; PSY 301 or EDN 302 and EDN 335. 

The study of secondary school social science 
curriculum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching social science. Directed 
observations. 

EDN 450— The Middle School (5-0-5) 

An overview of the history and purpose of the 
middle school; characteristics of the middle 
school learner, emphasis upon the nature and 
role of the middle school teacher and upon ap- 
propriate programs for the needs of middle 
school learners. 

EDN 451— Teaching Media (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 240 or permission of in- 
structor. 

Laboratory course in designing and produc- 
ing instructional media: transparencies, slides, 
tapes and other media for teaching. 

EDN 460— Multi-Cultural Education 
(5-0-5) 

Designed to study the educational implica- 
tions of cultural diversity. Examination of the 
school programs designed to meet the needs 
and interests of children from different ethnic 
backgrounds. 

EDN 471— Student Teaching— Knowledge of 
Content (O-V-5) 

EDN 472 — Student Teaching — Instructional 
Methods and Materials (O-V-5) 

EDN 473 — Student Teaching — Professional/ 
Interpersonal Skills (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: See "General Requirements 
Teacher Education Programs." Students are 
placed in selected schools for one quarter as 
full-time student staff members No additional 
credit hours may be earned while student teach- 
ing Classroom experiences and other staff re- 
sponsibilities are jointly supervised by the 



174 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



college staff, supervising teachers and princi- 
pals in the selected schools. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the Dean of 
Education at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. 

Exceptional Children Offerings 

EXC 220 — Introduction to Communicative 
Disorders (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the types, etiologies, and 
remediation sources and techniques of various 
communicative dysfunctions in children and 
adults in the areas of language, articulation, 
voice and stuttering. Emphasis is on the rec- 
ognition and awareness of these disorders, ap- 
propriate classroom strategies, and treatment 
referral. 

EXC 225— Phonetics for Speech 
Correctionists (3-4-5) 

Deals with the use of the International Pho- 
netic Alphabet (IPA) in speech correction, IPA 
transcription of normal and defective articulation 
and the important characteristics of regional di- 
alects are stressed. 

EXC 230— Anatomy and Physiology of the 
Speech and Hearing Mechanism 
(4-2-5) 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, 
and thorax from a speech and hearing stand- 
point. Special emphasis is placed on functional 
considerations of the respiratory system, larynx, 
oral and nasal structures, and ear. 

EXC 310— Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200 and PSY 301 or EDN 
302. 

An orientation to exceptional children with em- 
phasis on educational implications and rehabil- 
itation requirements. Includes classroom 
discussion of and visitations to facilities for train- 
ing. 

EXC 312 — Introduction to Learning 
Disabilities (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 310. 

An introduction to the area of specific learning 
disabilities, with an emphasis on identification, 
terminology, and prevalence. 

EXC 315 — Normal Speech and Language 
Development (4-2-5) 

The study of normal language development 
with emphasis on oral language. This course 



traces developmental scales of speech and Ian 
guage growth across various age levels and in 
eludes the relationship between speech anc 
language. Observations. 

EXC 335— Speech Science (4-2-5) 

Speecrvcommunication from a psychophysi 
cal standpoint. Study focuses on acoustics 
physics of speech, transmission media, anc 
physical analysis of speech. 

EXC 340— Behavior Management for the 
Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

A study of the application of behavioral prin 
ciples for the management and growth of ex 
ceptional learners. Consultation in using the 
principles with other teachers and with parents 
will also be emphasized. 

EXC 410 — Introduction to Audiology 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa 
tion. 

An introduction to the methods of hearing as 
sessment through pure tone and speech audi 
ometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of the 
hearing impaired. Supervised clinical practice 

EXC 411— Stuttering (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa 
tion. 

An introduction to the problem of stuttering 
its possible causes and the management train 
ing of cases. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 412— Language Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa 
tion. 

An introduction to language disorders of chii 
dren and adults. Etiologies, evaluation proce 
dures, and therapeutic approaches are studiec 
Major emphasis will be given to delayed Ian 
guage development. Supervised clinical prac 
ticum. 

EXC 413— Organically Based 
Communication Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa 
tion. 

The course includes a study of the commu 
nication problems related to disorders of voice 
cleft palate, and cerebral palsy. Supervised clin 
ical practicum. 

EXC 415— Articulation Disorders (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 225, admission to Teache 
Education. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluatior 
and methods of therapy for disorders of artic 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



175 



lation. The course includes the development of 
therapeutic program, lesson plans, and su- 
ervised clinical practicum. 

XC 420— Public School Program 
dministration (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
jn. 

Administration and implementation of public 
:hool speech therapy programs including 
entification, case load selection, scheduling, 
service, and relationship of speech therapy to 
e total school program. Supervised clinical 
ricticum. 

XC 422— Manual Language for the Deaf 
-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Educa- 
>n. Offered on demand. 
A study of the practices, procedures and 
ethods in teaching manual language to the 
3af, with a review of the historical philosophies 
id current trends and literature. At the conclu- 
Dn of the course the student will have a working 
jjity to communicate with a manual deaf in- 
vidual as well as the ability to teach deaf chil- 
en the process of manual language. 

XC 430 — Teaching Children with Learning 
isabilities (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: EXC 213, Introduction to Learn- 
g Disabilities and EDN 422, The Teaching of 
sading; admission to Teacher Education. 
Teaching strategies for children with specific 
arning disabilities. A focus on approaches, 
chniques, and materials with directed appli- 
ition. 



brary Media/Science Offerings 

\A 300 — Introduction to Media Profession 
-0-2) 

An introductory course in which students ex- 
nine the role, functions and services of differ- 
it types of libraries and information centers, 
nphasizes the role and responsibilities of li- 
arians/media specialists. Includes also the so- 
al role of libraries and library networks. The 
udent is given an opportunity to be involved 
public, school and special libraries during 
)ld experience 

W 310— Reference Sources (5-0-5) 

Study of basic reference sources, including 
marching strategies. The course has two 



of references and information sources; (2) study 
of specific sources of information in elementary 
and secondary schools as well as specific 
sources for a subject field. 

LM 320 — Cataloging and Classification 
(5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles of cata- 
loging and classification of multimedia materials 
combined with practical experience. Dewey 
Decimal and Library of Congress Classification; 
Sears and Library of Congress Subject head- 
ings; purchasing of printed library cards, and 
their adaptation and arrangement in the card 
catalog. Problems peculiar to the media spe- 
cialist are considered. Practical experience is 
also offered. 

LM 410— Media Selection (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

Selection of various types of media, based on 
fundamental principles and objectives. The 
course has three phases: (1) selection criteria, 
source lists and their use in media selection, 
publishing, and order process; (2) selection and 
evaluation of media for children considering cur- 
ricular considerations and understanding of the 
media specialist's responsibilities toward guid- 
ance in media; and (3) selection and evaluation 
of media for young adults considering curncular 
correlations and enrichment; recreational and 
developmental needs; young adult services and 
programs. Includes field experiences. 

LM 420 — Administration of Information 
Centers (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410. 

Study of organization and administration of all 
types of information centers including adminis- 
tering the budget, purchase of materials, per- 
sonnel, circulation, equipment, routines and 
schedules, maintenance of the collection, pre- 
ventive maintenance and minor repairs of equip- 
ment, and relations with administration and 
users will be considered. Students will examine 
the role of the media specialist in the curriculum 
process and media center instruction and ori- 
entation. School library media philosophies and 
educational objectives will also be examined. 
Concurrent enrollment in Media Internship is 
recommended. 

LM 425— Media Internship (0-12-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites LM 300. 
310. 320. 410, with a grade of "C" or higher and 
concurrent enrollment in LM 420 



176 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Supervised experience in library media cen- 
ter, or other appropriate setting. Students must 
complete 120 clock hours of work. Offered on 
a pass/fail basis. Application for the Internship 
must be made at least one quarter in advance. 

LS 110 — Introduction to Library Research 
and Materials (1-0-1) 

An orientation to the library, library terminol- 
ogy, search strategy formation, and major library 
aids such as the card catalog, classification and 
subject heading guides, periodical indexes and 
abstracts, encyclopedias, dictionaries, alma- 
nacs, handbooks and yearbooks, reviews, and 
criticisms, and biographical sources. This 
course will provide students with opportunities 
to learn how to access information in a variety 
of formats so that they can continue life-long 
learning. 

(The following library science courses are ad- 
ministered by the Director of Library Services 
and are taught by professional library faculty.) 

LS 311 — Principles of Library Research and 
Materials (1-0-1) 

Study of two separate but complementary as- 
pects of library research, research methodology 
and research tools. The methodology section 
addresses the way in which a research paper 
is written, from the selection of a topic to the 
paper's final bibliography. The study of tools fo- 
cuses on various print, non-print and on-line re- 
sources and services available to the student 
preparing a scholarly paper. Nursing and allied 
health resources are emphasized. 

LS 312 — Information Resources in the 
Humanities (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
humanities. 

LS 313— Information Resources in the 
Social Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
social sciences. 

LS 314 — Information Resources in the 
Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced ref- 
erence materials and search techniques in the 
sciences. 



SSC Business Education Offerings 

Special Note: The following courses are require 
ments of varied Bachelor of Science in Educe 
tion degree programs offered cooperatively wit 
Savannah State College. The courses are liste 
in alphabetical order by course description pre 
fix. The prefix codes are spelled out in the ck 
gree programs themselves. 

ACC 211-212— Principles of Accounting I 
and II (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" c 
better in Math 101 and 220. 

An introduction to the principles and proc( 
dures of accounting. Detailed study of the tect 
nique and formation of balance sheets, incom 
statements, ledger accounts, and journals. 

ACC 301-302— Intermediate Accounting I 
and II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ACC 211-212. 

Theory and problems application of accoun 
ing. Includes analysis, interpretation, and ar. 
plications of statements, investments, fund; 
and evaluations of fixed assets and liability ac 
counts. 

ACC 325-326— Federal Income Tax 
Procedures I and II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ACC 212. 

An analysis of the Federal Income Tax Lav 
and its application to individuals and partner 
ships. Extensive practical problems; prepara 
tion. of returns. Part II emphasizes federa 
taxation on corporations and fiduciary returns 
gift taxes and estate taxes. 

ACC 440— Business Information Systems 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ACC 302 or consent of instruc 
tor. 

Basic computer concepts applied to system 
and methods design, data flow analysis, and thi 
development of an understanding of a need fc 
control procedures in a business informatio; 
system. 

BAD 201 — Introduction to Business Data 
Processing (5-0-5) 

A concepts course on methods of processini 
data as related to business, includes the use c 
terminals and microcomputer systems as faci 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



177 



tating units for the recording and reporting of 
jata. Included in the course of study are the 
elecommunication terminal systems and the 
anguages necessary to communicate with a 
computing system. 

3AD 317— Business Law I (5-0-5) 

A study of legal rights, social forces and gov- 
ernment regulations affecting business; an in 
jepth study of the law of contracts; the law of 
personal property and bailments. 

IAD 225 — Business Communications 
5-0-5) 

Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

The application of basic principles of English 
irammar, basic report writing, and research 
?chniques to presentations and written com- 
lunications in relation to new media enters into 
ie consideration given to communication the- 
ry 
IAD 320— Business Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite; BAD 331. 

Principles, problems, and practices associ- 
ted with the financial management of business 
istitutions; nature and types of equity financing, 
lajor types of short-term and long-term debt; 
apitalization; financial statements, working 
apital requirements, reorganization; bank- 
jptcy; methods of inter-corporate financing, 
'rerequisite: BAD 331. 

IAD 340— Principles of Marketing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 

The distribution of goods and services from 
■roducer to consumers, market methods em- 
ployed in assembling, transporting, storage, 
ales and risk taking; analysis of the commodity, 
irands, sales methods and management; ad- 
ertising plans and media. 

IAD 350 — Materials of Teaching Business 
Jubjects (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: appropriate background 
h Business and Office Administration. 

An analysis of specialized methods used in 
aaching business subjects on t secondary level 
'om which the student involves personal phi- 
^sophy to determine teaching procedures. In- 
cudes basic principles and curriculum structure 
>f general and vocational business education. 



BAD 360 — Business Organization and 
Management (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A comprehensive study of principles of busi- 
ness organization and management. Emphasis 
is placed upon reports by students in which they 
collect data and make analyses necessary for 
organizing a business of their own choosing. 

BAD 400— Personal Finance (5-0-5) 

Devoted to family financial matters including 
budgeting, expenditures, taxes, credit, savings, 
investments and insurance, mutual funds, estate 
planning, trusts, wills, estate and gift taxes. 

BAD 425 — Managerial Accounting (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ACC 212, BAD 331 and BAD 
360. 

The study, interpretation and analysis of fi- 
nancial statements as tools of the management 
decision-making process. Some knowledge of 
statistical procedures as well as basic account- 
ing procedures are needed for studying this 
course. 

BAD 465— Business Policy (5-0-5) 

The integration of knowledge of the various 
fields of business, with emphasis on decision 
making. Case study approach. 

ECO 201 — Principles of Macro-Economics 
(5-0-5) 

Basic economic concepts, with emphasis on 
the role of government; national income and 
products; business cycles; money and banking; 
fiscal and monetary policy and international 
trade. 

ECO 202 — Principles of Micro-Economics 
(5-0-5) 

Basic economic concepts continued from 
201 . Factors of production; supply and demand; 
determination of prices and of income; mono- 
polies; the problem of economic growth; and 
comparative economic systems 

IAE 201— Wood Processing I (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ENT 102 

Care of tools and machinery, basic hand and 
machine operations, material selection and fin- 
ishing. 



178 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



IAE 202— Wood Processing II (3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: IAE 201. 

A study of the construction of more advanced 
projects by the use of power tools and ma- 
chines, and woodfinishing. 

IAE 203— Industrial Arts Design (3-7-5) 

Spring. 

Opportunities are provided for the develop- 
ment of design sensitivity and an appreciation 
for the aesthetic quality of products. Consider- 
ation is given.also to the analytical and problem- 
solving procedures of the industrial designers. 

IAE 301— Architectural Drafting (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ENT 102. 
A study of house planning and the making of 
architectural working drawings. 

IAE 302— Power Mechanics (3-7-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the theory, operation and servicing 
of small gas, outboard, and automotive engines. 
Theoretical consideration is given to turbines, 
jet engines, turbo-jets, and rockets. 

IAE 303— Graphic Art Technology (3-7-5) 

Instruction in the printing processes and 
areas related to the process. Experiences will 
include graphic design, composition, photog- 
raphy, offset printing and the screen process. 

IAE 312— General Electricity (3-7-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MAT 108. 

The nature, forms and sources of electricity, 
conductors, insulators, electrical measure- 
ments, low voltage and residential wiring, elec- 
trical heating and lighting. 

IAE 401 — Industrial Arts Electronics 
(3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: IAE 312. 

Electro-magnetism, relays, transformers, 
diodes, power supplies, test equipment, small 
project construction and troubleshooting. 

IAE 411 — Curriculum Building and Shop 
Organization (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301 or EDN 302. 

A study of the techniques of curriculum de- 
velopment, shop organization and manage- 
ment. 



IAE 421— Methods of Teaching Industrial 
Arts (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teache 
Education, PSY 301 or EDN 302. 

Lesson plan making, shop demonstration; 
use of a variety of instructional media, meaj 
uring achievement, and the various methods c 
teaching industrial arts. 

MET 212— Metal Fabrication (3-7-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENT 102. 

A study of various metal forming, joining an 
casting techniques using a variety of metals an 
processes. Study includes the care, setup an 
operating principles of equipment. 

MET 223 — Metal Machining Processes 
(3-7-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: IAE 212. 

A study of lathes, milling machines, shaper: 
drill presses, grinders, saws, and other machin 
tools. 

OAD 201. Beginning Typewriting/ 
Keyboarding (1-4-3) 

Current typing techniques and the applicatic 
of skills in typing letters, manuscripts, and sin 
pie tables. Minimum standard for passing: 5 
words per minute on time writings. 

OAD 202. Intermediate Typewriting 
(1-4-3) (See special note.) 

Introduction to production typewriting. Sk 
development in the typing of business letter 
forms, tabulation, and formal reports. Minimu 
passing speed: 40 words per minute. 

OAD 203— Advanced Typewriting (1-4-3) 

Production typewriting of office correspo 
dence, business letters, forms, tabulations, r 
ports, legal and medical document 
Prerequisite: OAD 202. Minimum passing spee 
50 words per minute. 

OAD 300— Office Machines (1-8-5) (Same I 
BAD 300) 

Acquaintanceship level of development < 
five basic classes of machines: adding and I 
culating; copy preparation, duplication; ke 
punching; and word processing unit 
Prerequisite: Typing proficiency. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



179 



•AD 301— Office Procedures (5-0-5) 

The study of secretarial and/or clerical pro- 
9dures and duties commonly encountered in 
usiness offices. Emphasis is also placed on the 
evelopment of desirable personal traits. Typing 
roficiency required. 

AD 311— Beginners Shorthand (1-4-3) 

The acquisition of shorthand fundamentals, 
linimum standard for passing: 60 words per 
linute for three minutes with 95 percent accu- 
icy. 

AD 312— Intermediate Shorthand 
-4-3)**(See special note) 

Continued development of theory, reading 
id writing shills, introduction to new matter dic- 
tion, and transcription of mailable letters. Min- 
ium standard for passing: 80 words per minute 
r three minutes with 95 percent accuracy. Pre- 
jquisites: OAD 202 and OAD 31 1 . 

AD 313— Advanced Shorthand (1-4-3) 

Continuation of 312 with added emphasis on 
ctation and transcription of simple letters and 
xuments. Minimum standard for passing at 
e end of the course: 100 words per minute 
ith 95 percent accuracy. Prerequisite: OAD 
12. 

AD 340 — Word Processing Concepts and 
echniques (2-6-5) 

The development of basic concepts and op- 
'ationa! techniques on selected Word Proc- 
ssing units. Prerequisite: OAD 301 . Typewriting 
'roficiency required. 

AD 425 — Administrative Management 
1-0-5) 

A systems approach that provides the frame- 
ork for understanding the role of the admin- 
trative manager in today's modern enterprise. 
i-depth treatment and analysis of the tools, 
hchniques, and concepts which make the ef- 
)rts of the administrator more effective. 

PECIAL NOTE 

"OAD 202 — INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 
ND OAD 31 2 — INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND 
re designed for Office Administration majors 
'ho have demonstrated proficiency in typewrit- 
ig and/or shorthand. 

A' student who cannot perform effectively on 
ie typing theory test and who cannot type at a 
unimum rate of 30 words per minute should 
ike OAD 201— Beginners Typewriting prior to 
nrolling for the intermediate course. 



A student who cannot perform effectively on 
the shorthand theory and who cannot take short- 
hand at a minimum of 60 words per minute 
should take OAD 311 — Beginners Shorthand 
prior to enrolling for the intermediate course. 

Advisement and/or placement tests for these 
courses are given prior to beginning of each 
quarter. 

TIE 100-200-210-300— Cooperative Industrial 
Work Experience (0-0-5) 

All quarters. 

Student works in industry under the supervi- 
sion of a college coordinator to gain practical 
work experience in the occupational area he 
plans to teach. If the student has prior accept- 
able work experience in his occupational area, 
credit will be granted in these courses propor- 
tionately. 

TIE 301 — History of Vocational Education 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the development of vocational-in- 
dustrial education in the United States, with em- 
phasis on personalities and technical 
developments that influenced its growth. 

TIE 303— Shop Management (5-0-5) 

A study of the sources of materials, means of 
purchasing, methods of inventorying; systems 
of arranging, installing, maintaining, storing and 
issuing shop tools and equipment. 

TIE 311-313-401-402-403— Competency in 
Occupation (0-0-5) 

Graduates of vocational-technical schools 
and others with occupational competency in an 
appropriate trade and industrial teaching field 
may receive credit by successfully passing oc- 
cupational competency examinations or other 
evidences of competency. 

TIE 323— Occupational Analysis (5-0-5) 

A study of the techniques of defining, identi- 
fying, classifying, organizing and expressing es- 
sential teachable elements of occupations for 
instructional purposes 

TIE 410— Instructional Aids (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to motivate and teach 
trade and industrial education teachers to de- 
sign, construct, and use all types of instructional 
aids which will facilitate teaching and learning 
in vocational education. 



180 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



TIE 411 — Industrial Education Curriculum 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301 or EDN 302. 

A study of course making and curriculum de- 
velopment with emphasis on organizing instruc- 
tional materials for vocational-industrial 
education programs. 

TIE 421— Methods of Teaching Industrial 
Subjects (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, PSY 301 or EDN 302. 

The techniques of making lesson plans, giving 
shop lectures and demonstrations, writing in- 
struction sheets, using a variety of instructional 
media, and measuring student achievement in 
trade and industrial education. 

TIE 431-432-433— Teaching Internship in 
Trade and Industrial Education (O-V-5) 

All quarters. 

A cooperative undertaking between the col- 
lege and public school system to provide col- 
lege supervision for employed permit trade and 
industrial education teachers. This experience 
is for one academic term and may be taken in 
lieu of EDN 481, 482, 483. Prerequisites: EDN 
335, TIE 411, 421; vocational teaching permit; 
full-time employment as a trade and industrial 
education teacher; and approval of teacher's 
employer. 



Graduate Programs and 
Courses in Education 



Objectives 

The Master of Education degree is designed 
to provide T-5 certification according to levels 
and specific areas as stipulated by the Georgia 
State Department of Education. 

By offering advanced preparation to those 
who professionally serve in schools, the de- 
partment hopes to aid in the development of 
teachers who possess the highest qualities of 
character, commitment, and professional com- 
petence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) en- 
couraging the student to do scholarly study in 
advanced professional, specialized and general 
education subject matter; (2) helping the stu- 



dent become acquainted with the most recei 
research developments in child growth and d< 
velopment and the latest trends in curriculur 
(3) deepening his appreciation for performanc 
in scientific investigation and research; and (< 
promoting personal and professional maturity i 
the student that will be reflected in his relatioi 
ships as he goes about his work in the cor 
munity and in the field of education. 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student is a 
signed an education advisor. As soon as tr 
student is notified of this assignment a confe 
ence should be scheduled to determine ar 
conditions and specific requirements the sti 
dent must meet in order to complete the degre 
and certification objectives. 

Transfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are delini 
ated in the Graduate Academic Regulatior 
section of this catalog. Information on CATE 
courses transfer is published in the same se 
tion. 

Comprehensive Examination 

An appropriate committee of the faculty of 1 
graduate program will administer an oral e 
amination to all candidates for the Master's d 
gree. The chair of the examining committee v 
be the student's advisor. The student and ti 
advisor will select the other two members of tl 
examining committee. This committee will ha 
at least one representative from one of the cc 
tent areas on the student's degree plan. 

The chair will select, in consultation with t 
student, the date, time, and place for the e 
amination and will report this information and t 
results of the examination to the appropriate c 
partment head. 

The department head shall notify the Grac 
ate Office concerning the proposed place, dc 
and time of the examination, the composition I 
the Committee, and the result of the examir 
tion. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



181 



arly Elementary Education 



ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
F EDUCATION IN EARLY ELEMENTARY 
3UCATION 

Hours 

v. Courses Appropriate to the Major 40 

1. Content courses to cover three 
areas 25 

2. Major area requirements 15 

a. EEE 727 5 

b. EEE 7 7 or 757 5 

c. Elementary Ed course 
elective 5 

\ Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722 5 

2. EDN 731, 771 and EDN 741 .... 15 

TOTAL 60 

Special Note: The requirement for exceptional 
ildren (EXC 622) must be met either at the 
aduate or undergraduate level. Meeting this 
any special need will require additional hours 
■yond the basic sixty. 

jading Certification Program 
i -5 Reading Endorsement) 

I Selected appropriate hours with advisement 
•m the following courses: EDN 641 , EDU 645, 
)N 743, 744, 753, 754. 



liddle School Education 



i^OGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
F EDUCATION IN MIDDLE SCHOOL 
DUCATION 

Several specialization programs are offered 
ider the aegis of the MEd degree in teacher 
iucation These specialized programs of study 
ovtde, in addition to the graduate major in mid- 
8 school education which leads to T-5 certi- 
ation. opportu ity for students to qualify for 
>rtain other kinds of certification. 



Graduate students majoring in middle school 
education must complete a minimum of sixty 
hours of approved courses in the following three 
areas: Professional Education Sequence, Spec- 
ialized Courses, and Approved Electives. 

One course in reading must be taken if not 
taken previously as well as an appropriate 
course in exceptional children if not taken pre- 
viously. 

The specialized content courses may be cho- 
sen from the following areas: art; music; foreign 
languages; health and physical education; lan- 
guage arts, including reading, literature, 
speech, linguistics; mathematics and science; 
and the social studies. Educational background, 
types of teaching experience, specific needs, 
interests and the goals of students will be the 
determinants for staff advisement in student se- 
lection of content areas. Upon the basis of the 
foregoing factors, students must choose spec- 
ialized courses from at least three (including lan- 
guage arts) content areas. 

Hours 

A. Courses Appropriate to the Major and 
Specialization 40 

1. Major field (content) courses in 
middle or elementary 

education 25-30 

2. Approved electives 10-15 

Elective courses are to be se- 
lected with advisement. For stu- 
dents not previously having a 
course in middle school edu- 
cation, EDN 650— The Middle 
School is required. Certification 
Options: 

Compatible with Education pro- 
grams are certification options 
in the specialized areas which 
follow. Students desiring certi- 
fication in either option may take 
the required courses as they 
pursue the master's degree in 
their respective teaching fields 

a Supervising Teacher Services 15 
Specific electives include: EDN 
681, 682, 683 

b Reading 25 

Reading Certification Pro- 
gram (T-5 Reading Endorse- 
ment) 



182 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Selected appropriate hours with 
advisement from the following 
courses: EDN 641, EDN 654, 
EDN 743, 744, 753, 754. 
B. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 721 or EDN 722 5 

2. EDN 731, 771, EDN 741 _J5 

TOTAL 60 



Secondary Education 



Degree Programs 

Master of Education degree programs in Busi- 
ness Education, Social Studies Education and 
Science Education are offered in cooperation 
with Savannah State College and with selected 
departments at Armstrong State College. M.Ed. 
degrees i English and Mathematics are de- 
scribed in those departmental sections. 

Objectives 

The MEd degree is designed to provide T-5 
certification according to levels and specific 
areas as stipulated by the Georgia State De- 
partment of Education. Degree programs for 
most secondary areas of certification such as 
English, history, science, etc. are described in 
this area of the catalog and are administered by 
the Department of Education in cooperation with 
the respective departments. The program for the 
M.Ed, in mathematics is described in the math- 
ematics section of the catalog. The Education 
Department also offers several complete pro- 
grams leading to certification such as Special 
Education, Behavior Disorders, Reading Spe- 
cialist, etc. The education department head can 
provide guidance for meeting the certification 
requirements. 

By offering advanced preparation to those 
who professionally serve in schools, the de- 
partments hope to aid in the development of 
teachers who possess the highest qualities of 
character, commitment, and professional com- 
petence. This aim will be facilitated by (1) en- 
couraging the student to do scholarly study in 
advanced professional, specialized and general 



education subject matter; (2) helping the stu 
dent become acquainted with the most recen 
research developments in child growth and de 
velopment and the latest trends in curriculum 
(3) deepening the student's appreciation fo 
performance in scientific investigation and re 
search; and (4) promoting personal and profes 
sional maturity of the student that will b< 
reflected in the student's relationships at worl 
in the community and in the field of education 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission each student is as 
signed an education advisor. As soon as th< 
student is notified of this assignment, a confer 
ence should be scheduled to determine an; 
conditions and specific requirements the stu 
dent must meet in order to complete the degree 
and certification objectives. 

Transfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are define 
ated in the Graduate Academic Regulation: 
section of this catalog. Information on CATE5 
course transfer is published in the same section 

Comprehensive Examination 

An appropriate committee of the faculty of m 
graduate program will administer an oral e> 
amination to all candidates for the Master's de 
gree. The chair of the examining committee wi 
be the student's advisor. The student and th 
advisor will select the other two members of th 
examining committee. This committee will hav 
at least one representative from one of the cor 
tent areas on the student's degree plan. 

The chair will select, in consultation with th 
student, the date, time, and place for the e> 
amination and will report this information and th 
results of the examination to the appropriate de 
partment head. 

The department head shall notify the Gradi 
ate Office concerning the proposed place, dat 
and time of the examination, the composition I 
the Committee, and the result of the examina- 
tion. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



183 



usiness Education 



dvisement 

Upon admission to this program each student 
assigned an advisor who approves a program 
study As soon as the student is notified of 
is arrangement a conference should be 
heduled by the student. 

)mprehensive Examination 

During the final quarter of residence a can- 
jate must pass a final comprehensive ex- 
lination in the field. The Business Education 
)ordinator shall notify the student, the Dean of 
3 School of Arts, Sciences, and Education and 
3 appropriate official at Savannah State Col- 
}e ten days prior to examination concerning 
? proposed place, date and time of exami- 
tion and the composition of the committee. 
e Examining Committee's decision on the 
ndidate's performance on the Comprehen- 
e Examination will be reported as "pass" or 
iil" to the Dean of the School of Arts, Sciences, 
d Education within three days after the ex- 
lination. 

Students interested in enrolling in the M.Ed. 
Business Education should contact the Head 
the Education Department at Armstrong State 
'liege, or Drs. Harven or Lamb of the School 
Business at Savannah State College. The 
siness Education Program is a cooperative 
:>gram between Savannah State College and 
nstrong State College. Course descriptions 
courses appropriate to this program are 
jnd in the Graduate Catalog of Armstrong 
ite College and the Graduate Catalog of Sa- 
nnah State College under the areas of Edu- 
tion and Business, respectively 
3ecause of the cooperative nature of the Busi- 
ss Education program, students are encour- 
ed to stay in close contact with their advisors. 

ansfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate credits 
an accredited institution may transfer a limited 
Tiber of credits to be applied toward the 
Ed. degree in Business Education. Transfer 
credit is handled on an individual basis. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF EDUCATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. Business Education Courses 35 

1 . Core Courses 25 

BAD 603, BED 601, 621, 622, 

623 25 

2. Option Courses 10 

Select two courses from BAD 
602, 604, 613, 621, 622 10 

B. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722, 731, 771 15 

2. EDN 741 5 

C. Elective 5 

Five hours from business 
administration, business edu- 
cation, or education to comple- 
ment the student's program. An 
appropriate course in excep- 
tional children (EXC 622) must 
be taken, if not previously taken. 

TOTAL 60 



The following courses are available at Savan- 
nah State College as a part of the cooperative 
Business Education Program. 

BED 601— Current Problems in Business 
Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the historical perspective or foun- 
dations of business education; current issues, 
problems, trends, curriculum development. 

BED 621— Communicative Skills (5-0-5) 

Trends, methods, and procedures in the 
teaching of shorthand and typewriting. 

BED 622— Office Information Systems (5-0- 
5) 

Prerequisite: OAD 340: Word Processing 
Concepts or equivalent background. 

The impact of concepts, practices, and trends 
in word processing and reprographics in a com- 
prehensive business education program. 

BED 623 — Accounting and Basic Business 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for T-4 certification in 
Business Education. 
Issues and instructional strategies 



184 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Science Education 



Advisement 

Upon admission to this program each student 
is assigned an advisor who approves a program 
of study. As soon as the student is notified of 
this assignment a conference should be sched- 
uled by the student. 

Comprehensive Examination 

To receive the MEd degree with a concentra- 
tion in science education, each student is re- 
quired to pass a comprehensive examination 
covering the areas in which he has had course 
work. The examination may be oral or written. 
Oral examinations will last approximately one 
and one-half hours; written examinations will last 
approximately three hours. This examination will 
be completed no later than mid-term of the 
quarter preceding that in which graduation is 
anticipated. If the student should fail the ex- 
amination, he may be reexamined orally or in 
writing, at the discretion of the departments in 
areas of specific weakness only. The Coordi- 
nator shall notify the student and the Dean of 
the School of Arts, Sciences, and Education ten 
days prior to the examination concerning the 
proposed place, date, and time of the exami- 
nation. The results of the examination are to be 
reported to the Dean of the School of Arts, Sci- 
ences, and Education within three days after the 
examination. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate credits 
at an accredited institution may transfer a limited 
number of credits to be applied toward the MEd 
degree in Science Education. Transfer of credit 
is handled on an individual basis. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF EDUCATION IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. Science Courses 35 

1. EDN 798 5 

2. Other courses are selected, in 
consultation with the student's 
advisor, from the graduate 
courses in biology, chemistry, 



earth science, mathematics and 
physics. Each student will be re- 
quired to take at least 30 hours 
of science content courses to in- 
clude at least ten hours from 
each of two separate 
disciplines 2 

B. Professional Education Courses 2 

1. EDN 722, 731, 771 1 

2. EDN 741 

C. Elective 

Electives are to be chosen 
through advisement and ac- 
cording to individual needs and 
may include courses in science, 
education, or a suitable third 
field with the prior approval of 
the student's advisor. An appro- 
priate course in exceptional 
children (EXC 622) must be 
taken, if not previously. 

TOTAL e 

Social Studies Education 



Objectives 

The purpose of the graduate program in S( 
cial Studies is, first and foremost, to increase th 
academic and professional skills, compete™ 
and enthusiasm of secondary teachers in the 
special fields and in the social studies generall 

In the broadest sense, the goal is to provic 
continuing intellectual enrichment to matuii 
adults of diverse interests, whose desire f<i 
learning has not ceased and for whom any d<i 
gree marks but a stage in a continuing proces- 
of personal growth. 

Advisement 

Shortly after admission to the program in J 
cial Studies, each student should contact 1 
coordinator to secure an advisor. As soon 
notified of the assigned advisor, the stude 
should arrange for a conference and begin pie 
ning a degree program. Failure by the stude 
to consult regularly with the advisor may grea 
lengthen the time necessary to complete t 
program. 

Transfer of Courses 

Students who have earned graduate cred 
at one or more accredited institutions may, i 
der certain circumstances, transfer a limit 
number of quarter hours of such credits to . 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



185 



Dplied toward the MEd degree program in So- 
al Studies. Such transfer of credits is handled 
j an individual basis and requires the written 
)proval of the student's advisor and the De- 
artment Head. In any case, no more than ten 
>urs credit will be considered for transfer into 
e major field. 

omprehensive Examination 

Satisfactory performance on comprehensive 
:aminations, both written and oral, will be re- 
jired of all degree candidates. (The oral com- 
ehensive examination required of "all 
indidates for the Master's degree", will be sat- 
ied by taking the oral comprehensive exami- 
ition required in this section.) Candidates 
lould notify their advisor of their readiness to 
> examined at the time they apply for the de- 
ee— i.e., no later than mid-term of their next 
final quarter. The Departments of Government 
id History have detailed guidelines on com- 
ehensive exaination procedures, a copy of 
lich will be given to each candidate at the time 
jplication for comprehensive examinations is 
ade. 



tOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
: EDUCATION IN SECONDARY 
i HJCATION— MAJOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

Teachers with baccalaureate degrees and 
1 io are certified in history, political science, or 
per social science disciplines earn T-5 certi- 
bation within the context of a balanced social 
' ence curriculum. Of the 60 hours (12 courses) 
■Quired to complete the degree, 40 will be se- 
ated from history, political science and eco- 
<mics. These, in addition to 20 hours of 

jfessional education, courses in the Social 
• lences are required as follows: 

Hours 

. History 20 

Including one course each in 
American, European, some 
area of Non-Western History 
and in Historiography. 

Political Science 10 

Economics 5 

Elective 5 

Selected with the advisor's con- 
sent from Economics, History, or 
Political Science. 

TOTAL 40 



Those with appropriate undergraduate prep- 
aration but who do not possess a teaching cer- 
tificate may also pursue this degree. Additional 
coursework establishes qualifications for T-5 
certification. 

Close supervision and individual advisement 
insure that the program will be tailored to the 
needs of each student enrolled in it and will pro- 
vide an adequate foundation for teaching a va- 
riety of subjects in the Secondary Social Studies 
curriculum. 



Special Education 



Armstrong State College offers Master in Ed- 
ucation degrees in the areas of Learning Disa- 
bilities, Behavior Disorders, and Speech/ 
Language Pathology. Courses are also avail- 
able to post-baccalaureate students who are 
certified in another area and wish to add certi- 
fication in Learning Disabilities or Behavior Dis- 
orders. Such a program must be planned 
according to the requirements of the Certifica- 
tion Office of the State Board of Education. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION- 
BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

Special Note: The prerequisite for this degree 
program includes Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622). 

Hours 

A. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722, 731, 771 15 

2. EDN 741 5 

B. Specialization Courses 30 

1. EXC 723, 754, 780, 781 20 

2. EXC 785, 786 10 

C. Related Field Courses 10 

Two courses selected from: 
EDN 641, 645, 753: EXC 625. 
626, 721, 755, 760, 770, 773, 
775, 788, 790, 791 , 792: CJ 501 

TOTAL 60 

Special Note: Students are required to com- 
plete a minimum of ten hours practicum (cf. spe- 
cialization courses) in one of the following ways: 



186 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EXC 785 and EXC 786 may be completed 
over a two quarter period by those students 
who are working full time with Behavior Dis- 
ordered students, or 

Students who are not employed full time 
may complete EXC 785 and 786 by working 
two different quarters in two different set- 
tings (such as Georgia Regional Hospital, 
Psychoeducational Center, Behavior Dis- 
orders classes) for a minimum of 10 hours 
per week for the quarter. 



C. Related Field Courses 

One course selected with ad- 
visement from the following: 
EXC 723, 754, 755, 770, 775, 
760, 790, 791, 792; EDN 641 

TOTAL 



Graduate Course Offerings 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION- 
LEARNING DISABILITIES 

Special Note: Prerequisites for this degree 
program include Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622), a T-4 Certificate, and one 
year of teaching experience. 

Hours 

A. Professional Education Courses 20 

1. EDN 722, 731, 771 15 

2. EDN 741 5 

B. Specialization Courses 30 

1. EXC 723, 741, 755 15 

2. EXC 770, 775, 788 15 

C. Related Field Courses 10 

Two courses selected from: 
EDN 721, 744; EXC 625, 754, 
760, 773, 793 

TOTAL 60 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION— 
SPEECH/LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 

Special Note: Prerequisites for this degree 
program include Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (EXC 622) and a T-4 Certificate in 
Speech Pathology or its equivalent. 

Hours 

A. Professional Education Courses 15 

1. EDN 722, 731 10 

2. EDN 771 5 

B. Specialization Courses 40 

1. EXC 730, 732, 734, 736 20 

2. EXC 737, 738, 739, 740 20 



EDN Offerings 

EDN 600— Internship (O-V-V) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only) 

Students who hold teaching positions 
school and/or clinic settings will be supervise 
by college staff members for one acaderr 
year. Supervisors will Observe and hold confe 
ences with each candidate. Students must cor 
plete one academic year to receive credit. 

EDN 602— Practicum in Middle School 
Education (O-V-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only) 

Supervised experience with middle schc 
children, level dependent upon prior expe 
ences of student. Seminars, projects, and 
search planned according to student needs 

EDN 604 — Practicum in Middle School 
Education (O-V-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only). 

Supervised experience with middle grac 
children, level dependent upon prior expe 
ences of student. Seminars, projects and 
search planned according to students' neec 

EDN 618— Literature for the Middle Schoo 
Learner (5-0-5) 

(See EDN 418 for course description.) 

EDN 620— Adolescent Literature (5-0-5) 

An examination of the values to be found | 
folk tales, classical myths and legends, asf 
as the body of contemporary writing, especic 
created to satisfy interests and needs of ac 
lescents. 

EDN 621— Tests and Measurements (5-0-£ 

Principles and procedures in evaluating pi 
growth. 

EDN 628— Reading in the Middle School ( 
0-5) 

Primary focus upon reading as a tool for i 
tending learning in the content areas in the rr 
die school. Emphasis is placed upon strateg 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



187 



it students can use to learn vocabulary, com- 
shend written materials, study and abstract 
ormation from content materials. 

>N 632— Multicultural Education (5-0-5) 

Educational study as it relates to the American 
ilti-ethnic society. Particular emphasis on eth- 
minorities. 

N 640 — Teaching Language Arts in 
jmentary School (5-0-5) 

ixploration in the four broad areas of the Ian- 
age arts. Investigation of pertinent research 
:he past decade; opportunities for enriching 
Deriences with media. 

N 641 — Methods of Teaching Reading 
3-5) 

tesic principles and methods underlying the 
100I reading program. 

N 642 — Reading and Literature for 
ildren (5-0-5) 

)esigned to acquaint elementary teachers 
i the stimulating language environment of the 
Id of literature for children. The literature ap- 
ach of language learning seeks to assist the 
:her in guiding children to become active, 
sitive learners who explore, inquire, and dis- 
er. 

N 645 — Reading in the Secondary 
i 100I (5-0-5) 

his course is designed to provide students 
li the rationale for teaching reading as they 
ibh their content areas. 

H 650— The Middle School (5-0-5) 

| See EDN 450 for course description.) 

: ^ 651— Newer Teaching Media I (2-6-5) 

Irerequisite: Undergraduate media or per- 

■ sion of instructor. 

ourse in multi-sensory learning and the uti- 
I ion and preparation of audio-visual mate- 
Is. Includes the areas of programmed in- 
I ction, instructional design, and computers in 
I cation. 

qvl 665 — Introduction to Adult Education 
W) 

rerequisite: Baccalaureate degree in teach- 

■ field or permission of Department Head. 
■In overview of the historical, philosophical 
fjes affecting adult education in the United 
Mes. Attention will be given to purposes of and 
>4:tices in the field. 



EDN 666— Psychology of Adult Learning: 
How Adults Learn (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 665. 

Designed to provide the student of adult ed- 
ucation with an opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with psychological factors which 
influence the adult's learning behavior. Specif- 
ically, the course will enable the student of adult 
education to acquire and/or to develop a basic 
understanding of the research and theoretical 
formulations regarding adults as learners. 

Emphasis will be placed upon conditions that 
affect the adult learner in terms of his ability, 
potential, motivation, self-perception, role iden- 
tification status and cultural background. 

EDN 668 — Adult Education-Strategies and 
Resources (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 666. 

Study and evaluation of methods and mate- 
rials employed in teaching adults. Utilization of 
psychology of teaching the adult learner with 
emphasis upon current teaching strategies for 
the educated and under-educated adult. 

EDN 681— Directed and Evaluating Student 
Teaching (5-0-5) 

Information, skills and understanding required 
for effective supervision of student teachers. Se- 
lected teachers. 

EDN 682 — Internship for Supervising 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Cooperative field experience involving public 
school teachers, student teachers, college per- 
sonnel. 

EDN 683 — Seminar in Supervision (5-0-5) 

An opportunity for experienced supervising 
teachers to evaluate criteria and to develop 
plans for increasing skills in guiding student 
teachers. 

EDN 690 — Teachers, Environment, and Free 
Enterprise Institute (6-7-10) 

This course is designed to assist teachers in 
increasing their understanding of the relation- 
ships of our physical and social environments 
and the free enterprise system. Emphasis will 
be placed upon the incorporation of this knowl- 
edge into classroom subject-matter teaching 
The course will utilize consultants from govern- 
ment, public utilities, industry, and education 
and will be supplemented by field trips 



I 



188 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EDN 691 — Science for Elementary Teachers 
(5-0-5) 

Opportunities for acquiring scientific knowl- 
edge and methodology appropriate for the el- 
ementary grades. 

EDN 702 — Seminar in Education for Staff 
Development (V-V-V) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Students 
must be enrolled in an approved staff devel- 
opment activity sponsored by a local school sys- 
tem. Admission to the course must be approved 
by the student's advisor and by the department 
head. 

This course is designed to provide a frame- 
work through which teachers and local school 
systems, in conjunction with the college, may 
offer graduate credit for approved staff devel- 
opment activities. Credit for this course may be 
approved for either content or elective work. 
With a change in content, this course may be 
repeated for additional credit. 

EDN 711— Philosophy and History of 
Education (5-0-5) 

Traditional and modern philosophical systems 
and their impact on educational theory and 
practice. 

EDN 721— Advanced Studies in Human 
Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

A comprehensive view of human growth and 
development with emphasis upon the recent lit- 
erature in these fields. 

EDN 722— The Nature and Conditions of 
Human Learning (5-0-5) 

An advanced study of the various theories of 
learning with emphasis upon the latest ideas in 
this field. 

EDN 725 — Contemporary Problems in 
Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Two or more courses in psy- 
chology or sociology or a combination of the 
two. 

A seminar to explore contemporary problems 
of a psycho-social nature affecting education. 

EDN 731 — Social Foundations of Education 
(5-0-5) 

Basic graduate course in the contribution of 
the social sciences to education, focused on the 
significant issues and problems of education. 

EDN 741— Curriculum Planning (5-0-5) 

Treatment of curricular trends and issues. Em- 
phasis upon criteria needed for curriculum plan- 
ning and development. 



EDN 743 — Problems in Reading (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 641. 

Content based upon problems met in th 
teaching of reading and fundamental principle 
and methodology of the reading process. 

EDN 744— Diagnosing and Prescribing in 
the Reading Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 641. 

Designed to evaluate primary issues in di 
ferentiated instruction. Examination of tec! 
niques employed in diagnosing and prescribin 
for reading difficulties. 

EDN 750— Practicum in Health 
Education (1-8-5) 

Supervised, educational activity in a variety 
settings including, but not limited to publ 
health agencies, private health facilities and/< 
public schools. The course will be devoted 
the design and implementation of health currii 
ulum and includes a weekly one hour semim 
on campus. 

EDN 751— Newer Teaching 
Media II (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 651 or permission of i 1 
structor. 

An advanced course emphasizing desk 
and production of instructional materials in a la 
oratory setting. Student will design, produc 
and try out individual projects using a variety 
media. 

EDN 753— Remedial Reading Practicum 
(2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 744. 

A study of the various methods and materiel 
utilized to test and teach remedial readers. T ! 
student will be required to tutor one poor read 

EDN 754 — Organization and Supervision cj 
the Reading Program (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 641. 
Designed to provide an in-depth study oft 
roles of the reading specialist. 

EDN 761— Principles and Practices of 
Guidance and Counseling (5-0-5) 

Guidance and counseling philosophy, pre 
ess and techniques with application to individ 
and group training and therapy. 

EDN 762 — Guidance in Elementary Schoo 
(5-0-5) 

Application of the guidance point of view e 
guidance techniques to the elementary sen 
classroom. Emphasis is upon the teacher's r 
in cooperating with professional guidance wc 
ers. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



189 



)N 771 —Education Research (5-0-5) 

Methodology of educational research and its 
(plication to instruction and guidance. 

)N 772— Field-Based Research (V-V-5) 

Research theory and an "on-the-job" re- 
arch project dealing with improvement in the 
jdent's specific situation. 

DN 773— Individual Research (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771. 
Under the direction of a graduate faculty ad- 
>or, students conduct research relating to their 
ofessional interests and responsibilities. 

)N 775 — Individual Study in Education (0- 
(1-5)) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771. 
Opportunities provided for supervised re- 
arch and independent study in selected 
3as. Research and reading in education to 
?et the needs of students involved. Designed 
students with a knowledge of research. All 
>rk offered on an individual basis with the ap- 
Dval of department chairman, advisor, and in- 
uctor concerned. 

>N 791— Environmental Science (5-0-5) 

Exploration of science principles through 
)blem-solving. Designed to make environ- 
?ntal science situations meaningful. 

»N/ZOO 792— Zoology for Elementary 
achers (5-0-5) 

Modern approaches to teaching the biologi- 
sciences. Emphasis on understanding of life 
)cesses in the animal kingdom. 

•N/BOT 793— Botany for Elementary 
achers (5-0-5) 

i.ecture-laboratory course dealing with prin- 
•les involved in classifying and identifying 
' nt life. 

I N/CHE 794— Chemistry for Elementary 
achers (5-0-5) 

|\ study of the more important metallic and 
"vmetallic elements with emphasis on prac- 
l\i\ application at the elementary school level. 

Ii N/PHS 795— Earth Science for 
I smentary Teachers (5-0-5) 

5tudy of the composition of earth, classifica- 
t,i and identification of rocks and minerals in 
cbrmat appropriate for teachers of elementary- 
E.3 children. 



EDN 796 — Geography for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

A critical examination of instructional proce- 
dures and techniques in teaching geography in 
elementary grades. Selection, organization and 
presentation of structured facts of human envi- 
ronment, both cultural and physical. Emphasis 
given to the conceptual approach in the analysis 
of space and regional interaction. 

EDN 797— Social Studies for Elementary 
Teachers (5-0-5) 

Investigation of newer approaches to social 
studies teaching. Emphasis on related skills as 
map and graph reading. Analysis of behavioral 
objectives for social studies teaching. 

EDN 798 — Problems in Science Teaching 
(5-0-5) 

Content is based upon problems met in the 
teaching of science with emphasis on the sci- 
entific method using the inquiry approach. 



Economic Education Offerings 

EED 600 — Dynamics of the American 
Economy (5-0-5) 

This course is designed for teachers and con- 
sists of a comprehensive overview of the Amer- 
ican economic system, with particular emphasis 
upon critical economic issues that influence so- 
ciety. Teaching methodology, applications, and 
materials development are presented as an in- 
tegral part of the course. 

EED 610— Personal Finance (5-0-5) 

This course is designed for teachers and cov- 
ers the basic elements of personal finance 
needed by individuals and family units in making 
wise decisions in today's society. Concepts cov- 
ered include: assessment of individual re- 
sources, selective spending, credit, taxes, 
insurance, savings, investments, and budget- 
ing. The course includes learning activities, cur- 
riculum development, and skills acquisition. An 
introduction to the use of computers in personal 
finance is integrated into the course 



190 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Early Elementary Education (EEE) Offerings 

EEE 557 — Movement Exploration and Motor 
Learning in Children (5-0-5) 

Emphasis on understandings, skills, and 
teaching techniques in movement education 
needed in the teaching of young children and 
pre-adolescents. 

EEE 558 — Creative Activities in Art, Music, 
Dance and Drama (5-0-5) 

Focus on activities in the four designated 
areas, utilization of interdisciplinary approach. 

EEE 602 — Practicum in Early Elementary 
Education (O-V-5) 

(Grade awarded, S or U only.) 

Supervised experience with young children, 
level dependent upon prior experiences of stu- 
dent. Seminars, projects and research planned 
according to students' needs. 

EEE 727— Child Growth and Development 
(5-0-5) 

Lecture and laboratory. Basic concepts and 
problems of child development; observation, 
behavior patterns, child study. 

EEE 737— Foundations of Early Childhood 
Education (5-0-5) 

Historical developments, philosophy and ob- 
jectives of nursery schools, kindergartens, and 
day care centers; exploration of teacher-child 
and teacher-family interactions, diagnosis and 
evaluation of children. 

EEE 738— The Young Child and His Family, 
School, Community (5-0-5) 

Interaction with community for services and 
resources. Family study from many different an- 
gles, utilizing data from various fields, devel- 
oping skills in procedures and techniques for 
working with parents. 

EEE 747 — Early Elementary Education 
Curriculum (5-0-5) 

Content, approaches, methods and materials 
appropriate for young children as presented in 
interdisciplinary or experience approach em- 
phasizing how language arts, science, mathe- 
matics, social studies, and the creative arts are 
adapted to skills and needs of children. 

EEE 757 — Early Elementary Instructional 
Strategies/Methods (5-0-5) 

Review of research and programs; teaching 
strategies for children under ten. Implications for 



program development. Developing skills 
volved in translating concepts into classroc 
practice. 



Education of Exceptional Children (EXC) 
Offerings 

EXC 622 — Introduction to Exceptional 
Children (5-0-5) 

An introductory study of the identification, c 
agnosis, and education of the atypical child. 

EXC 625— Mental Hygiene in Teaching 
(5-0-5) 

A consideration of the forces and influence 
on what constitutes normal behavior in person 
and social relationships within the school se 
ting. Student behavior, teacher behavior, ar 
student-teacher interaction dynamics will r 
ceive major attention. Open to qualified unde 
graduate students, graduate students, ar 
teachers seeking renewal of certificates. 

EXC 626— Psychology of Abnormal 
Behavior (5-0-5) 

The study of the various forms of abnorrr 
behavior of children; etiology, symptoms. 1 
treatment. 

EXC 723 — Assessment and Measurement 
the Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

This course will emphasize the means a 
interpretations of psychological, psychiatric, e 
ucational, and other evaluations. It will attenr 
to help the teacher understand and make re 
vant the test specialists' report. 

EXC 730 — Diagnosis and Appraisal of 
Communication Disorders (5-0-5) 

Instruments and procedures in diagnosi 
speech and language disorders. 

EXC 732— Voice Disorders (5-0-5) 

A study of the vocal mechanism and relat 
disorders; therapeutic procedures for varyi 
kinds of voice disorders are included. 

EXC 734 — Language Disorders in Childrei 
(5-0-5) 

Methods of differential diagnosis and ren) 
diation of the major language disorders of c 
dren. 

EXC 736— Language Disorders in Adults 
0-5) 

A study of speech and language disorder; 
adults, with emphasis on the pathology, eve 
ation, and treatment of aphasia. 



TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 



191 



<C 737— Advanced Articulation (5-0-5) 

A study of both functional and organically- 
ised disorders of articulation, including etiol- 
jy, diagnosis, and therapeutic procedures. 

(C 738— Aural Rehabilitation (5-0-5) 

Rehabilitation principles and procedures in- 
led in management of the hearing-impaired 
jrson, including speech reading, auditory 
lining, management of hearing aids and other 
iplification systems. 

(C 739 — Practicum I in Speech/Language 
ithology (Residence) (0-15-5) 

Supervised experience with a variety of com- 
jnication disorders in the public school and 
-campus clinic setting. The course includes 
3 development of therapeutic programs, writ- 
I lesson plans, and conducting therapy with 
ect supervision. 

C 740 — Practicum II in Speech/Language 

thology (Nonresidence) 

15-5) 

supervised experience with a variety of com- 
nication disorders in off-campus, nonpublic 
iooi settings. Approved settings may include 
jpitals, nursing homes, special day schools, 
j institutions. 

C 741— Remedial Reading for the 
optional Child (3-4-5) 

irst half of course consists of classroom in- 
jction in procedures for teaching reading. 
:ond half of course consists of tutoring an 
optional child in reading under the instruc- 
s supervision. 

3 754 — Behavioral Intervention 
F »cedures for Children (5-0-5) 

iiO acquaint students with historical back- 
Ijund. developments, concepts, definitions. 
t< mnology and techniques of behavioral inter- 
/■tion as well as application of such proce- 

EZ 755 — Advanced Research and 
R idings in Special Education (5-0-5) 

: ne students will be directed in research and 
f cpings in special education to deepen their 
:ge of exceptional children and to draw 
ons from research to apply to specific 
I ations. Historical perspectives and current 
rids in special education will be emphasized. 

= ^ 760 — Consultation with Parents and 
*ifessionals (5-0-5) 

.is course is designed to broaden the skills 
)f ie teacher of the exceptional child by im- 



proving communication with regular classroom 
teachers and parents of exceptional children. 

EXC 770 — Characteristics of the Learning 
Disabled (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 622 or equivalent. 

The emphasis in this course will be on inci- 
dence, etiologies, prevailing characteristics, 
and family interactions of learning disabled chil- 
dren. 

EXC 773 — Independent Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 771. 

Under the direction of a graduate faculty ad- 
visor, students conduct research relating to their 
professional interests and responsibilities. 

EXC 775— Methods of Teaching the 
Learning Disabled (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 770. 

The student will survey the various methods 
that have been developed to work with the learn- 
ing disabled student, learn how the methods are 
applied, and design teaching strategies for in- 
dividual learners based on the theoretical 
models. 

EXC 780 — Introduction to Behaviorally 
Disordered/Emotionally Disturbed (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 622. 

A study of the etiology, prognosis, and treat- 
ment of behavior disorders in children. An ex- 
tensive examination of the social milieu will 
characterize the course. 

EXC 781 — Education of the Emotionally 
Disturbed (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 780. 

The student will survey the various types of 
programs and approaches historically and cur- 
rently in operation for the emotionally disturbed 
child. Emphasis will be placed on those pro- 
grams within the public school setting. 

EXC 785 — Practicum I in Special Education 
(0-10-5) 

Five hours to be taken among the first twenty- 
five hours of the student's program. During this 
time, the student will be required to interact with 
behavior disordered children a minimum of ten 
clock hours per week in programs designed to 
ameliorate the disability. 

EXC 786 — Practicum II in Special Education 
(0-10-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 785. 

Five quarter hours of individual studies under 
the direction of the student's advisor, or the ad- 
visor's designate. The student will be required 



192 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



to work with behavior disordered students for a 
minimum of ten clock hours per week. The pro- 
gram will be designed so that the student de- 
velops proficiency in a minimum of one 
treatment mode for behavior disordered chil- 
dren. The student will be expected to demon- 
strate expertise in planning, implementing, and 
continuously reevaluating his/her treatment ap- 
proaches. 

EXC 787— Practicum III in Special 
Education {0-1 0-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 786. 

Five hours taken during the final quarter of the 
student's program. The student will be required 
to serve a minimum of ten clock hours per week 
in facilities designed for behavior disordered 
and/or multiple handicapped children. The stu- 
dent will be expected to have direct involvement 
in teaching exceptional children. A portion of this 
five quarter hours must be served in a residential 
facility. 

EXC 788 — Practicum in Learning 
Disabilities (0-10-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 770 and EXC 775. 

The student will be required to serve a mini- 
mum of ten clock hours per week in classes 
designed to teach identified learning disabled 
students. The student will be expected to have 
direct involvement in planning for and teaching 



learning disabled children individually and 
small groups. 

EXC 790 — Seminar in Characteristics of tl 
Mildly Handicapped (5-0-5) 

The seminar will cover the causes and ct" 
acteristics of the mildly handicapping conditk 
of behavior disorder, learning disability, i 
mental retardation. 

EXC 791— Seminar in Methods for Workir 
with Mildly Handicapped (5-0-5) 

This methods course will prepare the teac 
to plan effective remediation strategies for 
dividuals and groups of children with mild 
havior disorders, learning disabilities, £ 
mental retardation. 

EXC 792— Practicum in Working with the 
Mildly Handicapped (0-10-5) 

The student will spend a minimum of ten ho 
per week planning for and teaching groups 
children who are placed in interrelated cla 
rooms, i.e., children with behavior disorde 
learning disabilities, and mental retardation. 

EXC 793— Special Education Administrati 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the role of leadership person 
within general and special education in plann 
and implementing comprehensive educatic 
programs for exceptional students. 



School of 

Health Professions 




194 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



School of 

Health Professions 

Repella, James, Dean 



Goals and Objectives 

The faculty of the School of Health Professions 
believes that the development of the student as 
an individual is a primary objective of a college 
education. The central role and function of the 
School of Health Professions is to provide an 
appropriate academic, intellectual, and profes- 
sional milieu to develop the skills required for a 
high level of professional competence. This in- 
cludes the development of intellectual and phys- 
ical competencies; personal values and beliefs; 
leadership abilities; a sense of integrity, self- 
worth, and self-reliance; and a sense of respon- 
sibility toward the community and society. To 
achieve these objectives, the goals of the School 
are: 

To prepare graduates who possess, at the ap- 
propriate level, the competencies required 
in their professional endeavors, and whose 
practice is compatible with the ethics of 
democratic humanistic philosophy; 
To prepare an educational environment which 
will motivate the student to develop a life- 
long commitment to learning and services; 
stimulate creativity, flexibility, and inde- 
pendence of thought and judgement within 
acceptable professional and humanistic 
constraints; and foster appreciation for 
scholarship and critical reasoning; 
To develop the leadership abilities of students 
so they may function effectively as leaders 
both in their professions and in their com- 
munities; 
To anticipate and to identify problems and 
needs and to encourage change and open- 
mindedness in finding solutions through 
appropriate research. 
To develop the School as a planning and re- 
source center for professional growth and 
community service; 
To complement other Schools of the College by 
providing programs of a uniquely profes- 
sional character which enhance the edu- 
cational opportunities of Armstrong State 
College. 



Organization and Degrees 

The School of Health Professions includes t 
Departments of Associate Degree Nursing; Be 
calaureate Degree Nursing; Dental Hygiei 
Health Science, Health and Physical Educati( 
Respiratory Therapy; and the degree prograi 
in Health Information Management, Medit 
Technology and Radiologic Technologies. 

The following degree programs are offer 
within the School: 
Associate in Science in: 
Dental Hygiene 
Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 
Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: ■ 
Dental Hygiene Education 
Medical Technology 
Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Education in Hec 
and Physical Education 
Additional degree programs, those at 
masters level, are delineated in the gradu 
section of this catalog. 



Associate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

Vacant, Department Head 
Bell, Dorothy 
Caldwell, Eva 
Connor, Sara 
Dutko, Kathleen 
Miller, Mary 
Pruden, Ginger 
Reilly, Nancy 
Williamson, Jane 



The Associate Degree Nursing Program^ 
vides the student with the opportunity to ob 
a general education and to study nursing at 
college level. The program is approved by 
Georgia Board of Nursing and the Naticj 
League for Nursing (NLN). Graduates are 
gible to take the National Council of Si 
Boards of Nursing Licensure Examina' 
(NCLEX-RN) for licensure to practice as F 
istered Nurses. Student nurses participate 
nursing clinical experiences at local hosp 
and other community agencies and are resf 
sible for providing their own transportation. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 



195 



'regression Requirements 

For progression through the Associate De- 
ree Nursing Program, the following must be 
laintained: 

1. Natural science courses (CHE 20 1; ZOO 
208, ZOO 209, BIO 210) 

a. A grade of C or above is required for 
ZOO 208 and 209. 

b. A grade of D or above is required for 
CHE 201 and BIO 210 Only one D will 
be allowed 

2. Nursing courses: 

a. A grade of C or above is required in 
each nursing course. 

b. A student may repeat a given nursing 
course only one time. 

c. A student may repeat two different 
nursing courses. 

d. A student who must repeat a course 
will be subject to availability of space 
in the subsequent course. 

e. Students who must repeat any one 
nursing course more than one time will 
be dismissed from the program. 

f. Students who must repeat more than 
two nursing courses will be dismissed 
from the program. 

3. Grade Point Average: 

The maintenance of a 2.0 adjusted GPA is 
Bsirable throughout the nursing program. Stu- 
?nts who fall below 2.0 are subject to academic 
atus classification delineated in the Academic 
sgulations section of this catalog. Students 
aced on academic warning who do not raise 
eir GPA's to the stipulated GPA by the sub- 
hquent quarter will be suspended from the pro- 
\ am unitl the requirements are met. Courses 
j;ed to raise the GPA must have Department 
ead approval. 
\\. Regents' Exam 

i All students must have passed the Regents' 
1<am before entering their last nursing course. 

, surance 

To meet contractual obligations with the co- 
derating clinical agencies, the Department re- 
jires students to submit a completed health 
story form and evidence of nursing liability and 
)Spitalization insurance prior to participation in 
mical practicums. 

dvanced Placement 

The first two nursing courses, Nursing 1 1 and 
1 , may be exempted by one examination with 
edit awarded. Medical corpsman and li- 



censed practical nurses who have graduated 
and/or practiced in a clinical setting within the 
past two years are eligible to sit for this exami- 
nation. Proof of the above is required. The ex- 
amination may be taken only once. Students 
who successfully challenge Nursing 110 and 
111 will be required to complete Nursing 113. 
Successful completion of the examination does 
not guarantee admission into the program. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Areall 25 

1. ZOO 208, 209 10 

2. BIO 210, CHE 201 10 

3. MAT 101 5 

Area III 15 



1. HIS 251 or 252 

2. POS 113 

3. PSY 101 

Area IV 

1 . PE 1 1 7 or 1 66 and one activity 
course or three activity 
courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. NUR 110,111,112,113. (for ad- 
vanced placement students 
only) 210, 211, 212, 213 55 

C. Regents' and National Standardized 
Nursing Examinations 

TOTAL 108 

Curriculum Design 

Prerequisites 

ZOO208 5 



CHE 201 5 

MAT 101 _5 

15 



1st Quarter 



NUR 110 
ZOO 209 
ENG 101 



6 

5 

_5 

16 



196 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



2nd Quarter A continuation of NUR 110. This course int 

N yp -j-j-j 7 duces fluid/electrolytes, rest/comfort, emotioi 

BIO 210 5 safety, love/belonging and self-esteem. T 

ENG 102 5 nursing process is used for patients undergoi 

~~ surgery with emphasis upon nursing skills, \ 
tient teaching and interpersonal relationship; 

3rd Quarter NUR 112 _Concepts of Adult Nursing I 

NUR 112 8 (5-9-8) 

PSY 101 5 Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 11 

PE 117 or 166 2 BIO 210. Corequisite: PSY 101. 

*NUR 113..., _£2) Basic human needs are evolved into the cc 

1 5(1 7) cepts of oxygenation and metabolism in the ca 

... O rt °* tne '" ac * u 't- These concepts focus on coi 

mon health problems in which there is a ma 

NUR 210 8 daptive response of the body's ability to me 

HIS 251 or 252 5 its oxygen, nutritional, fluid or elimination neec 

PE ACTIVITY „J_ Physical assessment skills are included. 

14 NUR 113 — Transition to Associate Degree 
5th or 6th Quarter Nursing (2-0-2) 

N i id P11 11 Offered on Demand/Prerequisites: Succes 

pnc'no 1 ful Exemption of NUR 110 and 111, BIO 21 

— Corequisites: Nur 112, PSY 101 

16 This course is designed for the advanci 

5th or 6th Quarter placement student. Content includes review 

N| , R ?1? q dosage calculation and introduction to the'cc 

ruiipoHo fi ceptual framework with emphasis on nursii 

^— process, roles of the AD nurse, growth and c 

15 velopment, communication and teaching/leai 
*For Advanced Placement Students Only ing. 

NUR 210— Concepts of Adult Nursing II 
(5-9-8) 

OFFERINGS Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 112 

The second quarter of study of the physicc 

NUR 110 — Nursing to Meet Basic Needs I ill adult. Basic human needs are evolved intot 

(3-9-6) concepts of inflammation/immunity and perce 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Admission tion/coordination. These concepts focus 

to the nursing program, ZOO 208, CHE 201, common health problems in which there is 

MAT 101, eligibility for ENG 101. Corequisite: maladaptive response of the body's ability 

ZOO 209. protect itself from physiological harm or m< 

This course introduces the conceptual frame- activity and sensory needs. Rehabilitative I 

work of the nursing program with emphasis on pects of care expand the provider and teach 

basic human needs, growth and development, roles, 
biopsychosocial man, teaching/learning and 
roles of the nurse. The nursing process is used 
to promote adaptation with problems related to 
hygiene, activity/exercise, safety, elimination, 
oxygenation, nutrition and sexuality. Principles 
of pharmacology and administration of non-par- 
enteral medications are presented. 

NUR 111— Nursing to Meet Basic Needs II 
(3-12-7) 

Fall, Winter Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 110, 
ZOO 209. Corequisite: BIO 210. 



NUR 211— Concepts of Advanced Nursing 
(5-18-11) 

Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: NUR 2 
The third quarter of study of the physically 
adult. The concepts of oxygenation, metal: 
lism, inflammation/immunity and perception/c 
ordination provide the basis for study of ! 
critical care aspects of nursing. The student < 
velops beginning skills as coordinator of c< 
for patients with multiple needs. Transition fn 
the role of student to practitioner, leaders! 
skills and trends/issues are emphasized. 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



197 



IR 212— Nursing in the Maternal-Child 
intinuum (6-9-9) 

-all, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. 
.requisite: NUR 213. 

rhis course concentrates on the experience 
the childbearing family/developing child as 
>y impact upon the health care system. Em- 
asized is the use of the nursing process to 
xnote adaptation during the stages of child- 
aring and into the life cycle from birth through 
olescence. The teaching/learning interaction 
d developmental appropriateness of care are 
ditional foci. 

IR 213— Mental Health-Psychiatric 
irsing (3-9-6) 

r all, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. 
requisite: NUR 213. 

rhis course focuses on the development of 
f-awareness and on the therapeutic use of 
f in assisting man to achieve mental health. 
3 nursing process is used for the patient with 
)blems of psychosocial adaptation. Examined 
; therapeutic communication skills, teaching/ 
rning, developmental level and the roles of 
psychiatric nurse. 



accalaureate Degree 
jrsing 

:ulty 

;k. Marilyn. Department Head 

I. Eunice 

iway, Marian 

1, Marcella 

ler. Carola 

ett, Nettie 
Issey, Carole 
nella, James 

?se!, Rosalyn 

ox, Elaine 



: duate Faculty 



he Armstrong State College Department of 

ixaiaureate Nursing offers entering fresh- 
"i, transfer students, and Registered Nurses 
opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science in 
sing Degree. The American Nurses Asso- 
ion (ANA) and the National League for Nurs- 
(NLN) have adopted a position statement 
* ing for the baccalaureate degree in nursing 
iithe academic preparation for professional 
ig practice. Graduates are prepared to 



provide comprehensive nursing care for people 
in a variety of settings. The BSN degree also 
provides the foundation for graduate education 
in nursing. 

The program is approved by the Georgia 
Board of Nursing and is fully accredited by the 
National League for Nursing (NLN). Graduates 
who are not already RNs are eligible to apply to 
take the National Council Licensure Examination 
(NCLEX-RN) for licensure as a Registered Nurse 
(RN). 



Progression Requirements 

For the generic Bachelor of Science program: 

1. A "C" or better must be earned in each 
science course. 

2. A "C" or better must be earned in each 
nursing course. No more than one nursing 
course may be repeated and a "C" or better 
must be earned at the time to remain in the 
program. 

3. Any nursing course which the student does 
not satisfactorily complete must be re- 
peated at its next offering. The course may 
be taken concurrently with a non-sequential 
course 

4. An overall grade-point average (GPA) of 
2.0 is required to remain in the nursing pro- 
gram. 

5. Students must submit a completed health 
history prior to the first clinical experience 
and maintain a current health history record 
throughout the program. 

6. Students must submit proof of liability and 
health insurance prior to the first clinical 
experience. This insurance must be main- 
tained while in the program. 

7. Students must obtain CPR certification prior 
to the first clinical experience. It must be 
maintained throughout the program. 

8. The Registered Nurse may challenge BSN 
310, 334. 335. 336, 350, 422, 423 through 
written examinations. No more than one- 
fourth of the degree requirements may be 
taken by correspondence, extension, or ex- 
amination. All required science courses 
must be completed before enrollment in 
BSN 433 and/or BSN 436 (For further in- 
formation see BSN Department) 

9 All students must have passed the Regents 
Exam before entering their last quarter. 



198 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



10. If a student does not matriculate each 
quarter, excluding Summer Quarter, the 
student must apply for readmission to the 
College and to the Department, (see Read- 
mission page 28) 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 



Curriculum Design 

— Freshman Year- 
Fall 

ENG 101 

CHE121 

MAT 101 

PE 



Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201; ENG 222 5 

Areall 20 

1. CHE 121, 122* 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III .....: 25 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and HIS 251 or 252... 10 

3. PSY101 5 

ArealV 30 

1. BIO 210; PSY 295; SOC 201; 

ZOO 208, 209, 215 30 

Area V 6 

1. PE 117 or 166 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Thfee activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 82 

1. BSN 231, 310, 320, 334, 335, 
336, 340, 350, 422, 423, 432, 

433, 436 77 

C. Courses in Allied Fields 11 

1. LS311 1 

2. Electives 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examination 

Total 194 

'Students who have already completed CHE 
201 with a "C" or better may challenge CHE 121 
and take CHE 1 22 or complete an approved lab 
science sequence of Core Area II. Students who 
have already completed an approved Area II lab 
science sequence may take CHE 201 to meet 
the prerequisite for ZOO 209. 



Winter 

ENG 102 or 192 

CHE 122. 

HIS 114 or 191 

PE 103 or 108* 



Spring 

ENG 201 or 292 

HIS 115 or 192 

ZOO 208.: 

PE 117 or 166 



— Sophomore Year- 

' Fall 

PSY 101 

ZOO 209 

Area I Elective 

PE 



Winter 

BIO 210 

MAT220 

SOC 201 

LS311 



Spring 

PSY 295 

BSN 231 

ZOO 215 

PE 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



199 



— Junior Year — 

Fall 

5SN310 7 

JSN320 5 

Pol. Sci./Am. His 5 



1/ 



Winter 

■SN334 6 

■SIM 340 5 

lective, or 5 

SN335 6 

16or 17 

Spring 

SN336 3 

SN 350 or BSN 423 6 

SN 335, or 6 

lective 5 

14 or 15 

—Senior Year- 
Fall 

SN 350 or BSN 423 6 

SN422 6 

SN 432 or Elective 5 

17 

Winter 

SN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

lective or BSN 432 5 

15 or 17 

Spring 
SN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

10 or 12 

3y State law, each student who receives a di- 
loma or certificate from a school supported by 
ie State of Georgia must demonstrate profi- 
ency in United States History and Government 
nd Georgia History and Government. Students 
Armstrong State College may demonstrate 
uch proficiency by successfully completing ex- 
aminations for which credit will be awarded for 
critical Science 113 and History 251 or 252. If 



students elect to take courses instead of chal- 
lenging them, students will be responsible for 
arranging their schedules to complete both of 
the courses before graduation. 

OFFERINGS 

BSN 231— A Conceptual Framework for 
Professional Nursing (5-0-5) 

On demand. Prerequisite: LS 311. PSY 101, 
SOC 201. 

This course is designed for beginning stu- 
dents of professional nursing. The conceptual 
framework of the baccalaureate curriculum is 
examined. Major emphasis is placed on an in- 
troduction to the concepts of Man, Health, and 
Nursing. 

BSN 310 — Concepts of Nursing Practice 
(4-9-7) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231 , PSY 295, all required 
science courses. 

This introductory course provides the foun- 
dational knowledge for clinical nursing. Empha- 
sis is placed on concepts for professional 
nursing practice that will assist individuals to 
meet health needs. The student assumes the 
role of professional nurse by implementing var- 
ious cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal 
skills to promote positive adaptation. 

BSN 320— Health Appraisal of the Individual 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 215, BSN 231 or permis- 
sion of department head. 

This is a beginning course in physical as- 
sessment which provides knowledge and ex- 
perience for the nursing student and interested 
health professional, with a focus on appraisal of 
the individual throughout the lifecycle. Emphasis 
is placed upon understanding of physical as- 
sessment skills appropriate for nursing. Course 
didactic and laboratory components focus on 
normal findings of the physical appraisal and 
common deviations from normal are addressed 
as necessary. 

BSN 334— Health Restoration of Adults I 
(4-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310, 320 

This course provides students with the op- 
portunity to assist adult individuals cope with 
alterations in the ability to meet human needs 
related to the concepts of oxygenation, fluid and 
electrolytes, perception and coordination, and 
metabolism. Clinical experiences are provided 
in secondary health care settings 



200 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BSN 335 — Promotion of Psychosocial 
Adaptation (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 310, 320. 

This course is designed to assist students to 
promote positive adaptive behavior of individ- 
uals and families with psychosocial problems 
through the use of the nursing process. Trends 
in mental health, legal issues and the role of the 
nurse in the psychiatric setting are examined. 
Clinical experiences are provided in secondary 
health care settings and community mental 
health facilities. 

BSN 336— Leadership in Nursing Care 
Management (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310. 

Management and leadership principles are 
introduced and applied to nursing. The focus of 
this course is on the leadership role of the 
professional nurse in the management of health 
care. 

BSN 340— Nursing and Family Health 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310 or permission of de- 
partment head. 

This course is designed to explore the family 
as a biopsychosocial unit of a multi-cultural so- 
ciety. Internal and external variables affecting 
the health and adaptation of the family system 
are considered. The nursing process is utilized 
as a framework to assess structural and func- 
tional needs, plan nursing interventions, and de- 
velop outcome criteria. 

BSN 350— Nursing and the Childbearing 
Family (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 340. 

Using the developmental approach, this 
course focuses on health promotion and resto- 
ration of the childbearing family. The nursing 
process is utilized to assess health needs and 
promote positive adaptation. Clinical learning 
experiences are provided in a variety of settings. 

BSN 360— Issues in Gerontological Nursing 
(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, SOC 201, BSN 310, 
or permission of department. 

Application of the nursing process to the older 
adult population is the focus of this course. The 
emphasis is on promotion of health among the 
population in order to foster successful aging 
through positive adaptation. The student will ex- 
plore nursing strategies which promote the 
health of older adults. 



BSN 422— Health Restoration of Adults II 
(4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 335, 336, 340. 

This course provides students with the op- 
portunity to assume a beginning leadership role 
in the management of nursing care of adult in- 
dividuals and their families who are experienc- 
ing maladaptive responses related to comple> 
alterations in the ability to meet basic humar 
needs. Clinical experiences are provided in sec- 
ondary health care settings. 

BSN 423— Health Restoration of the Child 
(4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 340, 334. 

The student uses the nursing process as c 
problem solving approach in the care of childrer 
from infancy to adolescence experiencing al 
terations in their ability to meet human needs 
Clinical experiences are provided in secondary 
care and community settings. 

BSN 432— Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Three clinical Nursing courses 
and MAT 220. 

This course focuses on the research process 
from problem identification to communication o 
results. The evolution of nursing research is ex 
amined and the role that clinical nursing re 
search plays in the improvement of the qualit 
of care is emphasized. 

BSN 433 — Nursing and Community Health 
(5-15-10) 

Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, 350, 422, 423. 

This course is designed to provide student 
with the knowledge and opportunity to utilize th- 
nursing process to assist clients to attain the* 
maximum level of wellness through the promc 
tion and maintenance of health and the prever 
tion of disease. The student functions as 
beginning member of the interdisciplinary healt 
care team to plan and provide comprehensiv- 
nursing care in selected community settings. 

BSN 436 — Professional Nursing Practicum 
(4-24-12) 

Prerequisites: BSN 320, 340, 350, 422, 423 
This course provides the opportunity for sti 
dents to synthesize knowledge from the libers 
arts, sciences, and nursing as a basis for profes 
sional nursing practice. Students practice ■ 
leadership role of the professional nurse in as 
sessing, planning, implementing and evaluatini 
nursing care in a selected clinical setting. Serr 
inar sessions are provided for students to shar 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



201 



xperiences and to discuss trends and issues 
/hich influence change in professional nursing 
ractice. 

SN 450 — Health Restoration of Individuals 
rid Families Experiencing Critical Illness 
>-3-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 422 or permission of de- 
artment head. 

This course provides the opportunity for stu- 
3nts to synthesize knowledge from the liberal 
Is, sciences, and nursing to assist in the pro- 
otion of positive adaptation of individuals and 
milies experiencing multisystem failure. Criti- 
al thinking and problem solving opportunities 
Dm a nursing perspective are provided in se- 
cted critical care settings. 

SN 460— Independent Study (V-V-[1-3]) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of 

3N department. 

The student, in consultation with the profes- 

>r, will select the topic for supervised inde- 

jndent study. The student will submit an 

dependent study proposal prior to the quarter 

which the course is to be taken. 



S.N. Program and Courses 

>ordinator: Dr. Marilyn M. Buck 



fhe Master of Science in Nursing program 
lects the College's philosophy of learning in 
it it builds upon a core curriculum in the hu- 
mities, natural and social sciences. Cognitive, 
ective, and psychomotor domains are refined 
hin the nursing courses to foster the devel- 
ment of a professional who can participate in 
vanced nursing practice with individuals, 
nilies, groups and the community through the 
velopment of a chosen functional role in either 
lica! specialty or nursing administration. 
The Master of Science Degree in Nursing may 
pursued in two areas of concentration: Clin- 
il Specialty, and Nursing Administration 

dministration Criteria 

. Graduation from an NLN accredited bac- 
calaureate nursing program, or one ap- 
proved by MSN faculty. 
Minimum Grade Point Average: 
A. Regular Admission Status: G.P.A. of 
2.5 and G.R.E. score of 850 



B. Probationary Admission Status: G.P.A. 
x 100 + G.R.E. = 1050 or more, but 
minimum G.P.A. must be 2.0 and min- 
imum G.R.E. must be 800. 

1 . Students in probationary admission 
status may take three courses while 
in that status, and must achieve a 
grade of B or better in each course. 

2. Students who achieve a grade of B 
or better in each course are eligible 
for regular admission status (pend- 
ing approval by Admissions Com- 
mittee). 

3. Students who achieve a grade of C 
or less in any of the three courses 
must repeat that course until a 
grade of B or better is achieved. 

4. Students must achieve regular ad- 
mission status upon completing 15 
hours of course work, or will be ter- 
minated from the program. 

3. Prerequisite courses or approved equiva- 
lents: 

A. Elementary Statistics (Math 220) 

B. Health Appraisal of the Individual for 
clinical specialty major 

4. Basic knowledge of computer operations. 

5. Current Georgia license to practice as a 
registered nurse. 

6. One year professional nursing practice. 

Progression Requirements 

1. An overall grade point average (G.P.A.) of 
3.0 is required to graduate. 

2. Students must complete the requirements 
for the degree in 5 calendar years after 
either probationary or regular admission to 
the MSN program. 

3. Students must submit a completed health 
history prior to the first clinical experience 
and maintain a current health record 
throughout the program. 

4. Students must submit proof of liability and 
health insurance prior to the first clinical 
experience. These insurances must be 
maintained while in the program 

5. Students must obtain CPR certification prior 
to the first clinical experience This certifi- 
cation must be maintained throughout the 
program 

Advisement 

On admission to graduate studies, students 
should take immediate steps to contact the 



202 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Graduate Coordinator in the School of Health 
Professions. At this time, the student's status 
with respect to prerequisite coursework and 
transfer credits will be clarified. Also, an advisor 
will be assigned so that actual planning of the 
program o f study can begin. 

Transfer of Credits 

Students may transfer no more than 30 hours 
into the MSN program. All nursing major courses 
must be completed in residence. 

Students wishing to transfer credit for nursing 
core courses must have course work evaluated 
by nursing faculty. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Satisfactory performance on the comprehen- 
sive examination is required of all candidates. 
As coursework nears completion, the student 
should be in contact with the appropriate ad- 
visor to schedule the examination. 

Thesis Requirement 

Each student must complete a thesis. The 
preparation of the thesis is an integral part of 
the research courses and practicum taken in the 
final stages of the program. 



PROGRAM FOR THE MASTER OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE IN NURSING WITH A CLINICAL 
SPECIALTY 

HOURS 

COURSES RELATED TO THE MAJOR 15 

HOURS 

MSN 715 5 

Elective 5 

ZOO 715 _5_ 

Total 15 

Elective may be chosen in the areas of 
business administration, education, 
health science or nursing depending 
on area of desired concentration. 

Nursing Core Courses 18 

MSN 520 3 

MSN 530 5 

MSN 600 5 

MSN 610 _5_ 

Total 18 



Nursing Major Courses 2 

THESE COURSES MUST BE TAKEN 
IN RESIDENCE 

MSN 710 3 

MSN 725 5 

MSN 735 5 

MSN 745 6 

MSN 755 5 

MSN 760 _3_ 

Total 27 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE MASTER Ol 
SCIENCE IN NURSING ADMINISTRATION 

HOUR 

Courses related to the major i 

HOUR 

BAD 501 5 

MSN 700 5 

BAD 540 _5_ 

Total 15 

Nursing Core Courses 18 

MSN 520 3 

MSN 530 5 

MSN 600 5 

MSN 610 _5 

Total 18 

Nursing Major c 

THESE COURSES MUST BE TAKEN 
IN RESIDENCE 

MSN 710 3 

MSN 720 5 

MSN 730 5 

MSN 740 6 

MSN 750 5 

MSN 760 _3 

TOTAL 27 



OFFERINGS 

MSN 520— Theoretical Basis of Nursing 
Practice (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: None 

This course provides the student with an u 
derstanding of the conceptual framework of 1 
vanced nursing practice. The nature of nursir 
theory development is discussed in terms 
nursing as a discipline and a science. Releva 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



203 



heories germane to nursing science are dis- 
cussed and current literature evaluated. Nursing 
heories/theorists are explored, analyzed, and 
ipplied in a practice setting. 

ASN 530— Contemporary Health Problems 
4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 520 

This course is designed to analyze contem- 
>orary health problems which affect the adap- 
ation of individuals and families. Emphasis is 
ilaced on use of the nursing process, theory 
t nd research to develop strategies for the pro- 
notion and maintenance of health with individ- 
uals, families, and aggregates. Current and 
jture implications of advanced nursing practice 
Dies are also investigated. 

flSN 600 — Contemporary Issues in Health 
;are Delivery (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MSN 530 

This course is designed to analyze current 
>sues and trends which affect the qualify, avail- 
ability and accessibility of the nursing care de- 
very system. Emphasis is placed upon the 
westigation and testing of organizational and 
ursmg theory and research to validate their 
pplicability towards resolving current issues 
/hich have an impact on nursing and health 
are. 

1SN 610— Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

: Prerequisite: MSN 520 

| This course explores the scientific basis for 

ursing practice. The student is introduced to 
i cience as a way of knowing and the research 
process as a tool of science. Building on MSN 

'20. emphasis is placed on nursing research 

itilizing current nursing conceptual models; 
qualitative versus quantitative research in the 
Siursing discipline, and protection of human 
ughts and ethical issues associated with nursing 

esearch. The steps of conducting scientific in- 
vestigations are explored 

ASN 660: Selected Topics in Professional 
Jursing (V-V-1-5) 

1 Prerequisites: Approval of graduate nursing 
iaculty. 

The student, in consultation with graduate 
cursing faculty, will select a topic for supervised 
i tudy in the area of nursing specialty. The stu- 
dent will submit a proposal for the study by mid- 
'erm preceding the quarter in which the study 
vill begin. 



MSN 700 — Administrative/Organization 
Theories (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 600 

This course examines organizational and ad- 
ministrative theories related to the health care 
delivery system. Organizational concepts and 
behaviors will be analyzed as they interface with 
the mission of nursing administration. Adminis- 
trative and organizational goals will be evalu- 
ated within the framework of clinical nursing 
goals. 

MSN 710 — Nursing Research Seminar 
(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MSN 610, 730, 735 
This seminar guides the student in the prep- 
aration of a nursing research proposal. Empha- 
sis is placed on the development of the proposal 
to include problem identification, literature re- 
view, and methodology. Each seminar is coor- 
dinated by a faculty member, and students are 
assigned according to their research interest. 

MSN 715: Nursing and Family Health 
(4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 520 

This course is designed to provide the student 
with a knowledge of family theories. Students 
will apply selected family theories in nursing 
practice with individuals, families, groups and 
communities throughout the wellness/illness 
continuum. 

MSN 720: Information Systems in Health 
Care (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MSN 700 

This course examines the development and 
utilization of information systems in the admin- 
istration of health care agencies and institutions. 
The course focuses on information acquisition, 
processing, analysis, and reporting pertinent to 
nurse managers. The learning format includes 
both didactic and experiential modes. 

MSN 725— Clinical Nursing I (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 715, MSN 600. 610, 715 

Winter Quarter 

This course is designed to provide students 
with the opportunity to utilize key concepts and 
theories relevant to the expert nursing manage- 
ment of clients with actual or potential health 
problems. Selected roles of the clinical nurse 
specialist are explored 



204 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MSN 730 — Financial Management of Health 
Care Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MSN 600, 610, 720; BAD 501, 
540 

This course provides an overview of the prin- 
ciples and process of financial management. 
Emphasis is placed on the assimilation of finan- 
cial concepts and their application in health care 
agencies/institutions. 

MSN 735— Clinical Nursing II (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 725 

This course is designed to provide graduate 
students with the opportunity to increase organ- 
izational behaviors to function effectively in the 
care of the client. Particular attention is given to 
improving the delivery of health care to con- 
sumers through consultation, teaching research 
and clinical practice. 

MSN 740— Administrative Role 
Development (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: MSN 730 

This course focuses on the roles used by the 
nurse administrtor in advanced nursing prac- 
tice. Utilizing the scope of knowledge regarding 
nursing models, the student will analyze the in- 
teraction between nursing theories-concep- 
tional models and nursing administration. 
Theories to be examined and applied include: 
role, change, leadership, organization, and ad- 
ministrative policy. Within the clinical setting, the 
student will analyze the role and function of the 
nurse administrator and the relationship of the 
nursing administration system to other systrems 
of the institution, the profession, and society. 

MSN 745— Clinical Specialist Role 
Development (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: MSN 735 

This course provides students with the op- 
portunity to implement the role of clinical spe- 
cialist with individuals and families experiencing 
selected health problems. Students will conduct 
an in-depth study of epidemiology, prevention 
and control, research, health care and clinical 
practice role in the specialty area of their choice. 

MSN 750 — Nursing Administration 
Practicum (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 710, 740 

This course is designed to assist the student 
in synthesizing the knowledge and experience 
obtained from previous courses in order to im- 
plement a chosen role in nursing administration. 
Students conduct research in their area of in- 
terest in nursing. 



MSN 755 — Clinical Specialty Practicum 
(1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: MSN 710, 745 

This course is designed to assist students tt 
synthesize knowledge and experiences fror 
previous courses to implement a chosen role ii 
the clinical setting. Students conduct researcl 
in their area of interest in nursing. 

MSN 760— Thesis (1-V-1-3) 

Corequisites: MSN 750 or MSN 755 
Students will complete preparation of a thesi 
in their area of interest in nursing. If the thesi 
is not completed in three quarter hours student 
must register for one quarter hour in any quarte 
in which faculty advisement is needed and i 
the quarter in which the student graduates. 



Dental Hygiene 

Faculty 

"Simon, Emma, Department Head 

Coursey, Teresa 

Edenfield, Suzanne 

Fleming, Caroline 

Tanenbaum, Barbara 
'Graduate Faculty 



The student must complete a curriculum c 
1 21 quarter hours in professional dental hygien 
courses for the two-year program leading to th 
Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygien* 
Dental hygienists provide dental health service 
in private dental offices, civil service position; 
industry, and in various public health fields. The 
practice under the supervision of a dentist an 
must pass a national and a state board exam 
nation for licensure. The curriculum is fully ap 
proved by the Commission on Accreditation c 
Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational Pre 
grams of the American Dental Association. 

A passing grade in all related natural scienc 
courses is a prerequisite to the 200 level Dentc 
Hygiene courses; therefore, CHE 201 , ZOO 20£ 
209, and BIO 210 must be satisfactorily corr 
pleted before the student will be admitted int 
second-year status in the Dental Hygiene Pre 
gram. 

The student must earn a "C" or better in eaci 
Dental Hygiene course before registering to 
subsequent dental hygiene courses; therefore 
a grade of "C" or better in the previous course(s 
is a prerequisite for each dental hygiene cours< 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



205 



: or which the student registers after the first 
quarter of the first year. An overall GPA of 2.0 
s required for graduation from the program. 

Certified dental assistants and military-trained 
jental hygienists may challenge DH 1 20 and DH 
124. (For further information, contact the Dental 
Hygiene Department.) 

The Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene 
Education program is comprised of preparatory 
courses that will enable the student to be em- 
)loyed in areas such as dental hygiene and den- 
al assisting instruction, dental health education 
i public school systems, and public health. The 
;tudent will work directly with the dental hygiene 
acuity and participate in the student teaching 
>racticums in various associate degree classes, 
Inics, laboratories, and extra-mural clinics. 



•ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN DENTAL 
IYGIENE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 48 

Areal 15 

1. ENG 101. 102, or 192 10 

2. DRS228 5 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 5 

Area III 20 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. SOC201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS 113 5 

ArealV 5 

1. CHE201 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 1 17 or 166 2 

2. One activity course 1 

. Courses in the Major Field 58 

1. DH 111, 112, 113, 118, 120, 
123, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214. 
216, 219, 220, 221, 223, 224, 

227 58 

. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. BIO210 5 

2. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. • Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 121 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 
EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 91 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. PHI 200 or 201 5 

Area II 10 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

Area III 25 

1. SOC201 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 and 114 or 191, 
115 or 192 15 

3. POS 113 5 

ArealV 30 

1. BIO 101, 102 10 

2. CHE 121, 122 10 

3. DRS228 5 

4. PSy 101 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 78 

1. DH 111, 112, 113, 118, 120, 
123, 124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 
216, 219, 220, 221, 223, 224, 

225, 226, 227 58 

2 DH 401, 402, 403, 404 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 35 

1. BIO210 5 

2. PSY 301, or EDU 302, PSY 

295 10 

3. EDN 200. EDU 335 10 

4. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 204 



OFFERINGS 

DH 111— Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2-6-4) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to introduce the stu- 
dent to the dental hygiene profession. The sub- 
ject matter includes fundamental knowledge of 
clinical procedures and techniques of removing 
deposits from the teeth. Clinical procedures are 
introduced on the the manikins and the student 
is required to practice these techniques until 
proficiency is achieved. 



206 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DH 112-113 — Clinical Dental Hygiene II and 
III (2-6-4) (1-9-4) 

Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequisite: 
DH 111. 

Students perform oral prophylactic tech- 
niques on patients in the clinic under supervi- 
sion. The subject matter includes procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance 
of clinical duties. The student must apply ac- 
quired knowledge in all clinical situations. 

DH 118— Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a 
basic understanding of periodontics. Emphasis 
is placed on periodontal health and disease in 
relation to the health of the total patient. Perio- 
dontal knowledge is applied in clinical situa- 
tions. 

DH 120— Dental Roentgenology (2-3-3) 

Winter. 

This course will include a series of lectures, 
demonstrations, and directed experience in the 
fundamentals of dental roentgenology. Intraoral 
techniques for the taking and processing of ra- 
diographs are taught and laboratory time will be 
devoted to demonstration and directed experi- 
ence. Clinical time in subsequent quarters will 
afford the application of the principles of clinical 
situations. 

DH 1 23— Dental Anatomy and Oral 
Histology (3-2-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize the den- 
tal hygiene student with the nomenclature, mor- 
phology, eruption sequence of the primary and 
secondary dentition and oral histology and em- 
bryology of the oral cavity. 

DH 124— Dental Materials (2-3-3) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to provide a general 
understanding of the chemical, physical and 
mechanical properties of dental materials. The 
indications and limitations of materials will be 
stressed as well as proper manipulation of those 
materials used by dental hygienists. 

DH 211-212-213— Clinical Dental Hygiene IV, 
V, VI (1-12-5) (1-15-6) (1-15-6) 

Fall,. Winter and Spring respectively. Prereq- 
uisites: DH 111, 112, 113. 

These courses are a continuation of the pre- 
ceding clinical courses. Emphasis centers on 
improved proficiency in all areas of a working 
clinic. Lecture time is devoted mainly to the dis- 



cussion of experiences encountered in clinicc 
situations. Pertinent material related to the der 
tal hygiene profession is included in thes< 
courses. 

DH 214 — Anesthesiology and 
Pharmacology (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is a study of drugs and anes 
thetics with special consideration given to thos 
used in dentistry. It is designed to acquaint th 
student with the principles of drug action in th 
human patient. 

DH 216— Dental Public Health (3-0-3) 

Winter. 

This course introduces the student to the va 
ious aspects of public health with reference t 
the dental needs of the community. Special err 
phasis is given to terminology, epidemiology 
and interpretation of data related to communit 
dental health programs. Directed field exper 
ence is a course requirement. 

DH 219— Total Patient Care (0-3-1) 

Fall. 

This laboratory experience acquaints the.sti 
dent with the subject and practice of the varioi 
dental specialties in relation to the patient's toj 
health. This course is also designed to acquaii 
the student with the expanding dental service 
provided by dental .auxiliary personnel. 

DH 220 — Directed Field Experience 
(0-4-1) 

Winter. 

The student is provided with a holistic ar. 
proach to dentistry by externing with privat 
dental practitioners and public and militai 
agencies. 

DH 221— Scopes of Dental Hygiene Practic 
(1-0-1) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to acquaint student 
with various scopes of dental hygiene practici 
the jurisprudence governing the practice of der 
tal hygiene, and the structure and function < 
professional associations. 

DH 223— Applied Nutrition (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course presents the aspects of nutritio 
as applied to the practice of dentistry. Studenl 
are instructed in diet history and dietetic cour 
seling. 



HEALTH SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 



207 



)H 224— Head and Neck Anatomy (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize the den- 
al hygiene student with gross anatomical rela- 
onships in the had and neck. Special emphasis 
3 given to the anatomy of the oral cavity and its 
:linical application. 

)H 225— Preventive Dental Health 
Education I (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

The principles of prevention of oral diseases 
ire presented. Many facets of prevention are 
icluded with emphasis on the utilization of oral 
)hysiotherapy aids and on education and mo- 
vation of patients in proper oral hygiene. Knowl- 
;dge from this course and preceding clinical 
:ourses will be utilized in a paper to be pre- 
dated to the class and clinical faculty. Clinical 
me in subsequent quarters will afford the ap- 
)lication of these principles to clinical situations. 

)H 226— Preventive Dental Health 
Education II (1-0-1) 

Winter. 

This course is a continuation of the preventive 
Jentistry concepts. The student is familiarized 
vith the practical application of modern meth- 
)ds of dental health education. Course content 
ncludes developing teaching materials for den- 
al health education, demonstrations, and pres- 
entation of materials. Directed field experience 
vill be provided to allow the student practical 
application of techniques learned in the class- 
oom. 

DH 227— General and Oral Pathology 
3-0-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize dental 
lygiene students with the principles of general 
Dathology in relation to the common diseases of 
oral regions. Emphasis is placed on clinical 
manifestations and the importance of early rec- 
ognition of abnormal conditions. 

DH 401— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 
Education I (3-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental 
Hygiene Education Program. 

This course is an introductory field experience 
in the college dental hygiene clinic, community 
agencies, and patient care facilities with em- 
phasis on observation, individual and small 
group teaching, and teacher aide work. The first 
professional course for majors in Dental Hygiene 
Education. 



DH 402— Practicum in Dental Hygiene 
Education II (3-6-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 401. 

This course is a continuation of Dental Hy- 
giene 401 Problems common to beginning den- 
tal hygiene teachers, practices and procedures 
designed to accomplish program objectives, 
establishment and organization of content, 
methods of evaluation and supervision in the 
dental hygiene clinic are included. 

DH 403 — Practicum in Dental Hygiene 
Education III (3-6-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 402. 

This course is an advanced field experience 
designed to assist the student in the develop- 
ment of learning activities, teaching procedures, 
and the presentation of materials pertinent to 
dental hygiene education. The student will de- 
velop and teach selected units in the basic den- 
tal hygiene sequence at community agencies, 
and patient care facilities. 

DH 404 — Directed and Individual Study 
(3-6-5) 

Spring. Corequisite: DH 403, Prerequisite: DH 
403. 

This course is a directed individual study in 
an area of major interest with emphasis relevant 
to dental hygiene and future career objectives. 
Scientific research and evaluation methods will 
be reviewed and used in the student's individual 
project. 



Health Science, Physical 
Education and Recreation 

Faculty 

'Sims, Roy, Department Head and Coordinator, 

M.Ed., P.E. 
"Simon, Emma, Coordinator, Health Science 

Aenchbacher, Edward 

Ford, Betty 

Knorr, Virginia 

Lanscy, Michael 
'Repella, James 

Streater, James 

Tapp, Lawrence 
"Graduate Faculty 



208 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Health Science 



The overall goal of the Health Science pro- 
gram is to make available an educational op- 
portunity for person's interested in entering a 
health field and an academic program for ex- 
perienced health professionals who wish to fur- 
ther their career opportunities. More specifically, 
the objectives of the program are: 

1 . To teach individuals that behavioral change 
can occur through education; 

2. To foster health, health promotion, and dis- 
ease prevention; 

3. To prepare competent, knowledgeable 
health educators; and, 

4. To provide health practitioners the oppor- 
tunity to gain expertise in the health related 
areas of education, management, correc- 
tional science, public policy, computer sci- 
ence, or health and fitness management. 

The emphasis of the curriculum is to view 
"health" as different from "illness" and to teach 
new students and practicing health profession- 
als of this difference. The curriculum will permit 
the student to earn a baccalaureate degree that 
reflects expertise in health science while focus- 
ing on an applied health related area. Upon 
graduation, these health professionals will im- 
plement the concepts they have learned and 
direct the efforts of the American public in the 
promotion, enhancement, and maintenance of 
health and in the prevention of health problems. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from : ART 
200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 
ENG 222; PHI 200 5 

Areall 20 

1. CHE 121, 122 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: 

ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 .. 5 



ArealV 3C 

1. HS 100 c 

2. HIS 251 or 252; DRS 228 1C 

3. PSY 101 c 

4. ZOO 208, 209 1C 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 2 

2. Three activity courses 2 

B. Electives 1C 

C. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. BIO310 5 

2. HS 150, 200, 201, 220, 230 25 

3. HS 300, 350, 400, 450, 451 25 

D. Courses in the Emphasis Area 32 

Area I— Health Education 30-32 

1 . EDU 335, PSY 301 or EDN 302 1 C 

2. HE 300, 370, 410, 420 2C 

Area II — Computer Science 3C 

1. MAT 103 or 220 £ 

2. CS 231, 306,331, 332, 431 2£ 

Area 1 1 1 — Correctional Science 3C 

1. CJ 100, 102, 210, 303, 409 2£ 

2. CJ elective £ 

Area IV— Education 3C 

1. EDN 460 - I 

2. EDU 335, 340, 451, 455 2C 

3. PSY 301 £ 

Area V — Management 3C 

1. BAD 211, 360 1C 

2. PSY 320., t 

3. Any one of the following three: 
a. Decision-Making 

1. BAD 212 t 

2. BAD 320, 330 or BAD 425 
and ECO 305 1C 

b. Human Relations 

Any of the following three 
courses: BAD 375, 462, PSY 

321, 322 1 

c. Public Policy 

1 . POS 305 and 306 or 307 1 

2. POS 401 or 403 

Area VI— Health & Fitness 

Management 3 

1. HE 370, 420 1 

2. PSY 315, 406 1 

3. PE230*, 330*, 421** 1 

*Prerequisite: ZOO 208, 209 
**Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations ......... 

TOTAL 191-19 



HEALTH SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 



209 



health Science Offerings 

HS 100 — Introduction to Health Science 
5-0-5) 

Exploration of the science of health. Based on 
he health (versus illness) model, this course will 
jmphasize the enhancement of health as part 
)f natural human development. The multifaceted 
lealth care delivery system will be introduced, 
md some ethical, philosophical, and socio-cul- 
ural issues of health care will be discussed. 

HS 110— Medical Terminology (3-0-3) 

A study of the language of medicine: word 
construction; definition; abbreviations and sym- 
)ols; and use of terms related to all areas of 
nedical science, hospital service, and the med- 
ical specialities. Open to non-majors. 

HS 150 — Health Care Delivery Systems 
5-0-5) 

Existing modalities for treatment, habitation, 
ind rehabilitation will be identified. Their inte- 
gration into primary, secondary, and tertiary 
reatment complexes will be discussed. Cost of 
Iness and health care delivery will be ad- 
dressed. 

HS 200 — Health and Human Development I 
5-0-5) 

A presentation of human growth and devel- 
)pment theory. Emphasis will be placed on the 
)hysical, cognitive and psychosocial develop- 
nent of man from pre-natal development to the 
Xdolescent Stage of the human lifespan. This 
vill be examined from the perspective of en- 
lancing health and concomitantly avoiding ill- 
less. 

-IS 201 Health and Human Development II 
5-0-5) 

The continuation of the study of human de- 
'elopment from young adulthood to the com- 
)letion of the life cycle. Special emphasis is 
Dlaced on health concerns and lifestyle con- 
sequences of the adult years of the life span. 

HS 220— Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BIO and CHE sequences. 

Nutrition, as a major component of lifestyle, is 
elated to enhancement of health and contri- 
bution to illness. Basic concepts of nutrition and 
/anous "diets" are studied. 

HS 230— Epidemiology (5-0-5) 

The application of ecology to health and ill- 
ness. An investigation into the various factors 
ind conditions that determine the occurence 
iind distribution of health, disease, and death 
among groups of individuals. 



HS 300— Health Problems in a Changing 
Society (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 230; BIO 310; or permission 
of instructor. 

A review of health status as a function of so- 
cietal change. For example, the effects on health 
of sewage disposal, speed-limits, cold-war, 
technology, and such will be examined. 

HS 350— Health in the Community (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 230; HS 300. 

The environment, communicable infections, 
health education, available treatment centers, 
and socio-political apparatus for change are in- 
tegrated and viewed as dynamics of the com- 
munity which may enhance health and prevent 
illness and injury. 

HS 40fJ — Seminar in Health Science 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 350. 

Health Science concepts are analyzed and 
synthesized. Emerging and emergent issues 
and trends are investigated. 

HS 450-451— Health Science Practicum 
(1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 400. 

A two-quarter sequence offering the Health 
Science degree candidate opportunity to be an 
active participant in the student's area of inter- 
est. The practicum will provide the basis for the 
required senior thesis. 

Health Education Offerings 

HE 260— Contemporary Health Issues 
(5-0-5) 

Study of major health topics along with their 
effects on modern society. Such topics as en- 
vironmental pollution, medical ethics, health 
care costs, personal health, and health consum- 
erism will be investigated. 

HE 261— Health and Sex Education (3-0-3) 

A study of the relationship between health and 
sex education. Health promotion strategies 
dealing with sexual behavior, sexually transmit- 
ted diseases, pregnancy, pregnancy preven- 
tion, and parenthood are involved. Emphasis is 
on interventions and curriculum material avail- 
able for teachers and health educators. 

HE 262— Health and Drug Education (2-0-2) 

A study of the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and 
drug use and abuse on health. It includes an 
analysis of the classification of drugs, the effects 



210 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



of drug usage, the legality of drug usage, and 
drug dependency. Emphasis is on interventions 
and curriculum material available for teachers 
and health educators. 

HE 300— Methods and Media in Health 
Education (5-0-5) 

The basic principles of education, integrated 
with various teaching methods and media ap- 
propriate to a health care setting, will be ex- 
plored. The methods and media will be 
designed for the biopsychosocial requirements 
of the client. 

HE 360— School Health Education (3-0-3) 

An investigation of the total school health en- 
vironment and health instruction. 

HE 370— Health Promotion Through 
Physical Activity (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A study of the effects of physical activity on 
health enhancement and maintenance. Physical 
assessment methods, equipment and prescrip- 
tion regimes will be included. A holistic ap- 
proach to health will be the basic theme of this 
course. 

HE 410— Health Education in the 
Community (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HS 300 and HS 350. 

A course designed to examine the process of 
assessing, planning, implementing and evalu- 
ating the health education needs of members of 
and groups within a community. The theories of 
group process, motivation and human devel- 
opment will be used extensively. 

HE 420 — Health Education in Rehabilitation 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HE 410. 

This course is designed to provide the student 
with the information necessary to aid patients in 
achieving their highest rehabilitation potential. 
The main objective is to aid the client in coping 
and complying with the prescribed regimen. 

HE 460— Health in the Curriculum (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HE 260, 261, 262, 360. 

The study of health education curriculum with 
emphasis upon materials and methods of teach- 
ing health education K-12. This course places 
special focus on the development of health ed- 
ucation curriculum, instructional units, writing 
objectives, lesson and unit planning, and the 
relationship of health education to the total ed- 
ucation program. 



Physical Education 



During the freshman year, all students shouk 
take PE 117 (Basic Health) or 211 (Safety an< 
First Aid) and 103 or 108 (Swimming). Durin< 
the sophomore year, students may elect an 
three Physical Education activity courses witl 
the last two numbers being between 01 and 0£ 
Students unable to participate in the regular pre 
gram should plan an alternate program with th< 
Head of the Department of Health Science 
Physical Education, and Recreation. 

Students should check their program of stud 
for PE 117 and/or 211 requirements 



Bachelor of Science in 
Education with a Major in 
Health and Physical Education 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Educatio 
with a Major in Health and Physical Educatio 
provides the student with an opportunity to re 
ceive a degree leading to teacher certificate 
K-12 in the areas of Health and Physical Edi 
cation. The progranris approved by the Nation? 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educatio 
(NCATE) and the Georgia State Department c 
Education. Students selecting this major shoul 
seek advisement in the Department of Healt 
Science, Physical Education and Recreatior 
Students pursuing this degree should refer t 
the Teacher Certification section of the catalo 
(page 163) to find those stipulations affectin 
all undergraduate education programs at Am 
strong State College. 

Progression Requirements: 

1. Successful completion of basic core r( 
quirements 

a. General Requirements 

b. Regents Exam 

2. Application for Admission to Major Prograi 

a. Departmental Advisor Assigned 

b. Program of Study Established 

3. Application for Admission to Teacher E( 
ucation (2.5 G.P.A. required) 

a. Media Competency Completion 

b. September practicum 

c. Application for Student Teaching A> 
signment 



HEALTH SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 



211 



4. Successful Completion of Departmental 
Requrements 

a. PEM451, 452, 453 

b. All additional major courses 

c. Proficiency tests 

d. TCT 

5. Application for Graduation 

linor Concentration 

The minor in physical education requires 25 
-edit hours with grades of "C" or better. The 
udent will select 25 hours from the following 
curses: 

1. PE210, 216, 217, 219,311,321, 413,421, 
PEM250, 251, 252, 351, 352. 

2. No more than two courses from: PE 212, 
213, 214 or 215. 

3e course offerings for the description of 
Durses. 



ROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
JACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
j'lTH A MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
DUCATION 

Hours 

V General Requirements 103 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2 One course from: ART 200, 271, 
272,273; ENG 222; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science 
sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, 
ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. EDN 200, DRS228, PSY 101 ... 15 

2. HE 261, HE 262 5 

3 PEM 250, PEM 252 10 

AreaV 5 

Five hours of activity courses... 5 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



B. Courses in the Major Field 54 

1. PE 103or 108 or 311 1 

2. PE 166 2 

3 PE 251 , 253, 254, 351 , 352, 353, 

354, 355 38 

4. HE 260, 360 and H.S. 300 13 

C. Professional Sequence 38 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 491, 492, 

493 25 

2. PEM 451, 452, 453 3 

3. HE 460; PSY 301; or EDN 302 10 

D. Electives 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 197 



Physical Education Offerings 

SPECIAL NOTE: 

Swimming is required of all students as part 
of their 6 hours of physical education. Students 
with a valid Advanced Life Saving certificate or 
who have passed the Armstrong swimming test 
may be exempted from the swimming require- 
ment. Students able to swim in deep water 
should register for P.E. 108. If in doubt as to 
proper course, consult one of the department's 
swimming instructors BEFORE REGISTERING. 

PE 100 — Beginning Weight Training 
(0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness 
through a variety of fundamental weight training 
exercises. Introduction of mechanical principles 
and techniques necessary for the understand- 
ing of weight training programs. Only one of PE 
100 or PE 204 may count as an activity courst 
toward the six hours of required physical edu- 
cation. 

PE 101— Lifetime Fitness (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Basic fitness concepts and their application 
to our everyday life. Students will select between 
two activity areas: jogging and flexibility/tone or 
lap swimming and aerobic dance. 



212 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 102— Team Sports (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Consists of two of the following sports: bas- 
ketball, volleyball and softball. 

PE 103— Basic Swimming Skills (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 311 or 316 
may be substituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Skills and strokes for the student unfamiliar 
with or afraid of the water and who cannot swim. 
Satisfies Armstrong swimming requirement. 

PE 104— Bowling (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in bowling. Minimum of two games 
required per class period at student's expense. 
Must provide own transportation. 

PE 105— Badminton (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Basic skills in badminton. Student must pro- 
vide own racquet. 

PE 106 — Beginning Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tum- 
bling and gymnastic apparatus. Required of 
Physical Education majors. 

PE 107— Trampoline (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The. teaching of the proper care and use of 
the trampoline. Under strict supervision, the stu- 
dent learns to perform the following skilis: seat 
drop, knee drop, front drop, pull over, cradle, 
turntable, swivel hips, and spotting. 

PE 108— Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer (PE 311 or the 
American Red Cross WSI course may be sub- 
stituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Four basic strokes, skills, endurance and 
knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or about 
water. Satisfies swimming requirement. 

PE 109— Intermediate Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106 or permission of 
instructor. 

Continuation of PE 106 with additional prac- 
tice of tumbling and gymnastic apparatus. 

PE 115— Officiating of Football (2-2-2) 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpreta- 
tion, and actual experience in officiating intra- 
mural games, approved community recreation 
games, and public school games. Elective 
credit. 



Students must provide own whistles, hats ai 
transportation to any offcampus assignment. 

PE 116— Officiating of Basketball (2-2-2) 

Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interprel 
tion, and,actual experience in officiating in cla 
games, intramural games, approved commun 
recreation games and public school game 
Elective credit. 

Student must provide own whistle and trar 
portation to any off-campus assignment. 

PE 117— Basic Health (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
A basic course in health education with ei 
phasis on personal health. Required of majoi 

PE 166— Safety and First Aid (3-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

The American Red Cross Advanced coun 
in First Aid and CPR. 

Required of majors. Contents of personal fir 
aid kit must be provided by the student. 

PE 200— Archery (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in archery for recreational use. 

PE 201— Elementary Tennis (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
Basic skills in tennis. Student must provii 
own racquet and qne can of new tennis bails 

PE 204 — Advanced Weight Training 
(0-2-1) 

fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 100 
permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on continued development of pty 
ical fitness through a variety of advanced weic 
training exercises. Improvement of maxirr 
muscular strength and endurance in the nric 
muscle groups of the body through progressi 
resistance exercises. Only one of PE 100 or I 
204 may count as an activity course toward t 
six hours of required physical education. 

PE 205— Folk Square, Social Dancing 
(0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Instruction and practice in all forms of fo 
square, and social dancing. Required of Ph\ 
ical Education majors. 



HEALTH SCIENCE, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION 



213 



•E 206 — Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Introduction to the art of modern dance In- 
ludes technique, exercise, basic improvisation, 
ance positions, and locomotor movement. 

E 207— Swimming Methods and 
echniques (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 108 or equivalent. 
Methods and techniques of teaching begin- 
ng swimming skills. Required of majors not 
ompleting the Water Safety Instructor's Course. 

E208— Golf (0-2-1) 

Fali, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the be- 
inning golfer. Minimum of 36 holes of golf must 
e played outside of class at student's expense, 
lust provide six shag balls for class and trans- 
lation. 

E 209 — Intermediate Modern Dance 
1-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 206 or permission of 
e instructor. 

A continuation of PE 206 with emphasis on 
/namics, composition, and choreography. 

E 210 — Prevention and Treatment of 
thletic Injuries (2-1-2) 

Winter. 

Theory and practice of caring for and pre- 
3nting injuries relating to a variety of sports, 
"udents required to assist in laboratory expe- 
3nces with treating and preventive training 

rough the athletic, intramural or physical ed- 
ition programs. Required of majors. Student 
iust provide own athletic tape. 

E 212— Coaching Football (3-0-2) 

I Fall. 

i Instruction and practice in fundamental skills 
pd team play, coaching courses is required of 
iiajors Minimum of two games must be scouted 
student's expense. 

E 213— Coaching Basketball (3-0-2) 

Winter. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills 
pd team play, emphasizing methods and drills 
iSed by leading coaches. One of the coaching 

curses is required of majors. Minimum of two 

ames must be scouted at student's expense 

E 214 — Coaching Baseball and Softball 
t-0-2) 

Spring 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills 
id team play emphasizing methods and drills 



used by leading coaches. One of the coaching 
courses is required of majors Minimum of two 
games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 215 — Coaching Volleyball and Soccer 
(3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Introduction to the rules and fundamental 
skills of volleyball and soccer. Individual devel- 
opment and application of successful coaching 
methods. Coaching methods will include ac- 
quisition of sound organizational practices and 
understanding of various coaching types. Re- 
quired of majors. 

PE 216 — Basic Games (2-0-1) 

Spring. 

Designed to acquaint student with the various 
categories of games, the appropriateness for 
each type of various age levels, proper pro- 
gressions, and the best ways to use games 
teach physical skills, emotional and social skills, 
and actual sports skills. Required of majors. 

PE 217— Techniques of Dance (2-0-1) 

Winter. 

Overview of the art of dance and its various 
categories. Stresses similarities and differences 
in form, technique and history of the ballet mod- 
ern dance, jazz dance, ballroom dance, square 
dance, aerobic dance and folk dance with em- 
phasis on teaching and techniques 

PE 219 — Techniques of Safety in 
Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106. 

Course designed to give majors thorough un- 
derstanding of the basic principles of spotting 
in gymnastics to assure maximum safety for 
learners as well as proper teaching progres- 
sions and lead-up skills necessary at each level 
of learning. Required of majors. 

PEM 250— Introduction to Physical 
Education (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the fields of physical edu- 
cation. Study will include a survey of historical 
foundations, relationships between health and 
physical education, professional skills, and ca- 
reer opportunities. 

PEM 251 — Intramurals and Recreation 
(3-0-3) 

This course is designed to prepare the stu- 
dent to organize and administer intramural and 
recreational sports activities for elementary and 
secondary schools, for the college level and for 
the community. Activities range from canoeing 
to horseshoes Students are required to partic- 



214 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ipate in field experiences and observations. 
Transportation must be supplied by the student. 

PEM 252 — Human Anatomy and 
Kinesiology in Physical Education (5-0-5) 

A survey of selected systems of the body and 
the analysis of movement and application of me- 
chanical principles in physical education activ- 
ity. 

PEM 253 — Individual and Dual Sports 
(3-4-5) 

Designed to acquaint student with the various 
individual and dual sports. The student will ana- 
lyze and gain practice in teaching activities such 
as: archery, badminton, bicycling, bowling, 
fencing, fitness, golf, hiking, backpacking, rack- 
etball, tennis and weight training. 

PEM 254— Team Sports Curriculum (3-4-5) 

Designed for the enhancement of sports skills 
and for the analysis and practice in teaching 
these skills. Team sports include: basketball, 
field hockey, flag/tag football, soccer, softball, 
speedball and volleyball. 

PE 310— Techniques of Sports Skills 
(5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: PE 443 and student 
must have successfully completed an activity 
course in three of the following or have permis- 
sion of the instructor: golf, tennis, badminton, 
bowling, and team sports. Admission to Teacher 
Education. 

Analysis and practice in teaching sport skills, 
such as: golf, tennis, bowling, badminton, bas- 
ketball, volleyball, soccer and softball. Required 
of majors. 

PE 311— Advanced Life Saving Course in 
Swimming (1-2-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: 500 yard continuous swim 
using four basic strokes. 

The American Red Cross Advanced Life Sav- 
ing Course. (May be substituted for PE 103 or 
108). 

PE 315— Skill Techniques (0-2-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 310. Ad- 
mission to Teacher Education. 

Laboratory experiences in assisting and 
teaching activity courses in the physical edu- 
cation program. Students will assist college fac- 
ulty in planning, instructing, and evaluation 
procedures in a college physical education ac- 
tivity class. Majors only. Required of majors. 



PE 316— Water Safety Instructor (0-3-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Current Advanced Lift 
saving certificate. 

Course designed to teach proper method; 
learning sequences, and skills for the purpos 
of certifying students as American Red Cros 
Water Safety instructors qualified to teach B< 
ginning, Advanced Beginning, Intermediat 
Swimming and Advanced Lifesaving course: 
Includes review of lifesaving skills and practic 
teaching. Required of majors: PE 207 or 316. 

PE 317— Methods and Curriculum of Healtl 
Education in the Elementary and Secondar 
Schools (3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teach< 
Education. 

Selection of health content in school currici 
lum, preparation and presentation of health tof 
ics. Teaching method is emphasized an 
student participation is stressed. Required I 
majors. 

PE 320 — Health and Physical Education foi 

the Elementary School Teacher 

(3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teachi 
Education. 

Theory and current practice in the teachir 
of health and physical education at the eleme 
tary school level. Designed to meet the requir 
ment for elementary certification. 

PE 321— Movement Education (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

Designed to equip the student to teach e 
mentary physical education via the use 
"movement education," i.e., the guided disco 
ery method of teaching the concepts of Spa 
Awareness, Body Awareness, Quality of Bo' 
Movement and Relationships. Required of rr 
jors. 

PEM 351— Measurement and Evaluation ir 
Health, Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Math 220. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience 
the development, evaluation and application 
tests in health and physical education. Studer 
will learn to utilize computer software for instni 
tional and administrative purposes. 

PEM 352— Physiology of Exercise (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 252. 

A study of body systems and their reactic 
to various types and levels of exercise. Stu 
will include parts and functions of systems m» 



GRADUATE HEALTH SCIENCE 



215 



volved in the exercise process. Students will 
vestigate various components of physical fit- 
?ss, weight control, and exercise prescription. 

EM 353 — Elementary School Physical 
Jucation (4-2-5) 

Theory and current practice in the teaching 
elementary physical education including de- 
lopmental tumbling and gymnastics, basic 
Dvement patterns, fundamental and creative 
ythmic activities, activities related to health- 
less and basic skill pattern development. Mul- 
ultural considerations in planning and imple- 
enting adequate elementary physical 
lucation programs to meet the needs and in- 
ests of all students will be explored. Directed 
Id experience included. 

:M 354— Middle School Physical 
lucation (4-2-5) 

Theory and current practice in the teaching 
middle school physical education including 
jnts/tumbling/gymnastics, physical fitness 
ncepts and activities, rhythmic and dance ac- 
ities, individual/partner/group games, lead-up 
d modified individual/dual/team sports. Mul- 
ultural considerations in planning and imple- 
anting adequate middle school physical 
ucation programs to meet the needs and in- 
ests of all students will be explored. Directed 
Id experience included. 

:M 355 — Secondary School Physical 
lucation (4-2-5) 

The study of curricular methods, media and 
sessrnent of secondary physical education 
ograms as they apply to the developmental 
/els of the secondary age student. Multicul- 
"al considerations in planning and imple- 
anting adequate secondary physical 
ucation programs to meet the needs and in- 
ests of all students will be explored. Directed 
Id experience included. 

: 364 — Physical Education for the 
:ceptional Child (3-2-5) 

Student is introduced to methods of identify- 
b and programming for the exceptional child. 

I: 413— Special Topics in Physical 
lucation (5-0-5) 

Fall Prerequisite: PEM 351 
Research methods in health and physical ed- 
ation. Allows students an opportunity for m- 
,'Pth pursuit into areas of their interests. Open 
, majors only. Required of majors 



PE 421 — Organization and Administration 
of Physical Education and Athletics 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
or Admission to Teacher Education. 

Practice and policies in establishing, admin- 
istering, and evaluating physical education and 
athletic programs. Such experiences as curric- 
ulum planning and selection, care and mainte- 
nance of equipment are included in this course 
Open to majors only. 

PEM 451— Laboratory Experience I (0-2-1) 

Prerequisites: PEM 253, 254 

Laboratory experience in assisting and teach- 
ing activity courses in the basic physical edu- 
cation program. Students will assume instructor 
roles in class management, student assess- 
ment, methods of instruction, and the learning 
environment. 

PEM 452— Laboratory Experience II (0-2-1) 

See PEM 451 for prerequisites and course 
description. 

PEM 453— Laboratory Experience III (0-2-1) 

See PEM 451 for prerequisites and course 
description. 



Graduate Program and Courses 



Health Science 

Head: Dr. Roy Sims 
Coordinator: Dr. Emma Simon 

Objectives 

The Health Science Program is designed to 
enhance the concept of health on behalf of in- 
dividuals and the general public. The curriculum 
will emphasize health promotion, wellness and 
prevention rather than the curing of illness. The 
primary format will be an interdisciplinary ap- 
proach which permits a more global view of 
health. More specific objectives are 
1 . To teach individuals that behavioral change 

can occur through education 
2 To foster health, health promotion, and dis- 
ease prevention: 
3. To prepare competent, knowledgeable 
health educators: and, 



216 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



4. To provide health practitioners the oppor- 
tunity to gain expertise in the health related 
areas of education, administration, man- 
agement, computer science, correctional 
science, or public policy. 

Advisement 

Each student admitted to the MHS program 
will be assigned an advisor. As soon as the stu- 
dent is notified of this assignment, a conference 
between the advisor and advisee should be ar- 
ranged. This meeting will result in an approved 
program of study. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Satisfactory performance on the comprehen- 
sive examination is required of all candidates. 
As coursework nears completion, the student 
should be in contact with the coordinator to 
schedule the examination. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF HEALTH SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. Health Science Courses 40 

1. HS 500, 550, 660, 670, 700 25 

.2. EDN771 5 

3. HS 790, 791 or HS 795, 796 .... 10 

B. Concentration Courses 20 

(one of the following areas in 
toto) 

1. Health Education 20 

a. HE 500, 650 10 

b. HE 700, 770 10 

2. Computer Science 20 

3. Education 20 

a. EDN741 5 

b. EDN 632 or EDN 665 5 

c. EDN 731, 750 10 

4. Administration 20 

a. BAD 540, 662 10 

b. BADelectives 10 

5. Public Policy 20 

a. Three courses from: POS 
601, 603, 618, 705 15 

b. POS 619 or 560 5 

6. Physical Education 20 

a. PE700 5 

b. PE780 5 

c. PE770 5 

d. PE760 3 

e. PE800 2 

TOTAL 60 



OFFERINGS 

Health Education Offerings 

HE 500— Marketing Health— An 
Interdisciplinary Approach (5-0-5) 

From the point of view of social scientists c 
business and health professionals, the seHinc 
health using educational techniques is unc 
taken. The utilization of concepts of health i 
lifestyle is addressed. The Human Developm 
model is used. 

HE 650— Counseling and Health Care: 
Topics in Health Science and 
Developmental Crisis (5-0-5) 

Coping mechanisms appropriate to recuri 
problems in healthy living and developme 
crises are elaborated. Using noninvasive cc 
seling techniques, these mechanisms are 
fered for incorporation into lifestyles. 

HE 700— Selected Topics in Health 
Education (5-0-5) 

Psycho-social, political and economical i 
riers to health living are identified and atterr 
to overcome them made. Topics are seiec 
on the basis of contemporaneity, persister 
and impact. 

HE 770 — Health Promotion Through 
Physical Activity (5-0-5) 

A study of the effects of physical activity 
health enhancement and maintenance. Phys 
assessment methods, equipment and presc 
tion regimes will be included. A holistic 
proach to health will be the basis theme of 
course. 



Health Science Offerings 

HS 500— The Health-Illness Continua 
(5-0-5) 

Health and Illness are viewed not as end 
one continuum, but as two discrete contir 
The course will focus on enhancement of he 
and elimination of illness/injury — as afunctio 
lifestyle, and be taught from the perspectiv< 
"Human Development." 

HS 550 — Topics in Community Health 
(5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems and issues reg< 
ing the enhancement of health and the el 
nation of illness/injury. Lifestyles and so 
political factors relative to optional health 
age and groupings will be emphasized. 



GRADUATE HEALTH SCIENCE 



217 



S 660 — Selected Topics in Illness/Injury 
rid Rehabilitation— An Interdisciplinary 
pproach (5-0-5) 

Contemporary problems of Illness/Injury (e.g., 
/pertension, stroke, accidents, carcinoma, 
jbstance/nutrition abuse), their therapeutic in- 
dentions, and their rehabilitation regimens are 
;rutimzed. The Human Development model will 
3 utilized. 

S 670 — Selected Topics in Health— An 
terdisciplinary Approach (5-0-5) 

A discussion of the most recent findings which 
ihance health, and the incorporation of their 
idings into a lifestyle. Reduction of stress, ex- 
cise, nutrition, interpersonal relationships and 
her topics will be taken from the Human De- 
ilopment model. 

S 700 — Political Sociology of Health Care: 
ie Consumer, The Provider, and State, 
>cal, Federal Policies (5-0-5) 

An examination of the economic/political/so- 
al milieu in which health care exists. Con- 
'aints and demands of directing mores and 
gislation and their influences on lifestyles are 
gntitied and discussed. 

3 790— Practicum I (1-8-5) 

A two-quarter course giving the student op- 
)rtunity to specialize or to become knowl- 
igeable in a health, therapeutic, rehabilitation 
•tting, or combination thereof. 

3 791— Practicum II (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 790. 

See HS 790 for course description. 

3 795— Thesis (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

The student will identify and develop a re- 

•arch study in an area of interest in health. 

5 796— Thesis (O-V-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 795. 

The student will complete the research study 

tiated in HS 795. 



Physical Education 
Graduate Courses 

Coordinator: Dr. Roy Sims 



PE 700 — Advanced Physiology of Exercise 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 352 or equivalent Physiol- 
ogy of Exercise. 

A study of the neuromuscular, metabolic, and 
cardiovascular-respiratory responses and ad- 
aptations to exercise. Emphasis is placed on the 
biologic basis of human physical performance 
and fitness. Laboratory experiences include ex- 
posure to environmental, ergonometnc, meta- 
bolic, circulatory, respiratory, and body 
composition measurement techniques. 

PE 710— Psychology of Coaching (5-0-5) 

A study of the principles of psychology as 
applied to the problems of coaching today's ath- 
letes. A reading and research course designed 
to help students understand today's special sit- 
uations, individual and team personalities and 
ways to motivate and improve performance. 

PE 720— Philosophy of Sports in Society 
(5-0-5) 

A study of the significance of sports in society. 
The course will focus on the definition and clar- 
ification of sports and the sporting experience 
in order to determine the place and meaning of 
sports in our lives. 

PE 730 — Outdoor and Recreational 
Activities (5-0-5) 

In-depth study into the formulation of the major 
factors determining the philosophy of recrea- 
tion, program planning and administration of 
outdoor experiences and recreational activities 
in all aspects of school, church and industry. 
Emphasis upon the development of a specific 
recreational program and/or activity. 

PE 740 — Social and Psychological Aspects 
of Physical Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the research literature in sociology 
and psychology as it relates to physical activity 
Emphasis is placed on application to physical 
education and athletics 



218 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 750 — Administration and Supervision of 
Physical Education and Athletics 
(5-0-5) 

Advanced study and research into the rela- 
tionship of athletics and physical education pro- 
grams in the educational community. Specific 
attention is given to personnel, eligibility, fi- 
nance, liability, safety, and policies in directing 
and supervising intramural and interscholastic 
athletics. 

PE 760— Readings in Physical Education 
and Athletics (3-0-3) 

A comprehensive review of literature in phys- 
ical education, athletics, and related areas, with 
emphasis on learning to evaluate research 
methods and findings. 

PE 770— Motor Learning (4-2-5) 

This course is designed to acquaint students 
with research findings and empirical evidence 
regarding the physiological and psychological 
implications of motor skills, learning theories and 
other individual differences as they influence 
physical activity. 

PE 780— Mechanical Analysis (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 252 or equivalent Kinesiol- 
ogy. 

A scientific analysis of basic human move- 
ment skills with emphasis on the laws of physics 
and their application in physical education and 
sport. 

PE 790— Methods and Materials (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 317 or equivalent Methods 
and Curriculum in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Selection of level of specialization for indepth 
study of research materials and current trends 
in physical education teaching methods. 

PE 800 — Seminar on Current Issues 
(2-0-2) 

Study of current issues and problems in phys- 
ical education with emphasis on outstanding 
studies and research in the field. Emphasis is 
on student participation to provide them the op- 
portunity to exchange and assimilate ideas and 
concepts. 

PE 810 — Research in Physical Education 
(5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 351 or equivalent measure- 
ment and Education in Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation. 

A study of methods of research in physical 
education. An analysis of selected research ar- 
ticles and designs will be emphasized. 



Medical Technology 

Faculty 

Hardegree, Lester Jr., Program Director 
Miller, James, Medical Director 
Rodgers, Anne 

Medical technology is a career in clinical la 
oratory science. Medical technologists perfo 
and/or supervise the testing of blood, urir 
spinal fluid and other body specimens. Applyi 
the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics. a 
biology, the medical technologist uses be 
manual and automated techniques to provi 
diagnostic data to physicians. 

The B.S. in Medical Technology curriculum 
a 4 year program. During the first two or thr 
years students complete core curriculi 
courses in chemistry, biology, mathematics, r 
inanities and social science. The professior 
medical technology courses are sequenced 
begin each fall quarter. These courses cover t 
major laboratory areas (urinalysis, hematoloc 
clinical chemistry, blood banking, microbioioc 
serology), and are taught on campus. The cl 
ical practicum is provided in the clinical lat 
ratories of Candler General Hospital, the Soi 
Atlantic Red Cross Blood Center, Memor 
Medical Center and St. Joseph's Hospital, 
located in Savannah. Upon completion of i 
program, graduates are eligible to take the c 
tification examination of the Board of Regis 
for Medical Technologists of the American J 
ciety of Clinical Pathologists and the Clini 
Laboratory Scientist examination of the Natio 
Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory F 
sonnel. 

Insurance and Forms 

Students accepted into the program will 
required to submit a complete Armstrong St 
College Health Professions Student Health./ 
praisal form. Prior to enrollment in the clini 
practicum the student will be required to prov 
evidence of liability insurance and medi 
coverage. 

Progression Requirements 

1. The student must earn a "C" or bettei 
each Medical Technology course. 

2. A student may repeat a single MT cou 
only one time and at the next offering p 
vided space is available. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



219 



A student who must repeat a single MT 
course more than once or more than one 
MT course will be dismissed trom the pro- 
gram with no option for readmission. 
The student must maintain an overall ad- 
justed Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better. 
A student who falls below the 2.0 GPA will 
be placed on "Suspension" for one quarter. 
If the student's GPA is not raised by the 
end of the next quarter, then the student 
will be dismissed from the program. 
The student must complete the Profes- 
sional coursework within three (3) consec- 
utive years from the date of their initial 
admission to the Medical Technology Pro- 
gram. 



IOGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
tCHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL 
CHNOLOGY 

Hours 

General Requirements 96 

Area! 20 

1 ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 

292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 

200, 271, 272, 273; ENG 222; 
MUS200; PHI 200 5 

Areall 20 

1. CHE 128, 129 10 

2. MAT 101. 220 10 

Areall! 20 

1. HIS 114 or 191, 115 or 192 10 

2 POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from : ANT 

201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 

201 5 

ArealV 30 

1. BIO 101 or 111 5 

2. ZOO208 5 

3. Electives in BIO, CHE and/or 

CS 20 

(Must contain at least 1 Biology 
or Zoology course which com- 
pletes a 10 hour sequence, and 
1 Chemistry course.) 

AreaV 6 

1 PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



Courses in the Major Field 96 

1. Upper Division Sequences 20 

BIO 351, 353 10 

CHE 341, 342 10 

2. Professional Courses 76 

MT 300, 310, 320, 330, 340, 
350, 360, 370, 380, 390, 420, 
430, 440, 450, 411, 421, 431, 

441, 451, 461, 490 76 

Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 197 



OFFERINGS 

MT 300 — Professional Foundations in 

Laboratory Science 

(2-0-2) 

An introductory course to acquaint the student 
with the role of the Medical Technologist and 
other laboratory personnel as a member of the 
health care team. Topics will include job re- 
sponsibilities, accreditation, certification and li- 
censure standards, career opportunities, 
professional organizations, and professional 
ethics. 

MT 310 — Urinalysis and Body Fluids 
(3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A qualitative and quantitative study of the 
chemical and microscopic constituents of urine 
and other body fluids and the clinical signifi- 
cance of the test results. 

MT 32fJ — Clinical Microbiology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of pro- 
gram director. 

A study of the relationship of bacteria to dis- 
ease Major emphasis is placed on the isolation 
and identification of bacteria responsible for hu- 
man diseases. Also included is sensitivity test- 
ing and mycobactenology. 

MT 330— Clinical Hematology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director 

A qualitative and quantitative study of the 
formed elements of the blood To include the 
complete blood count and specialized test pro- 
cedures. This course will also include the basic 
principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 



220 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MT 340 — Clinical Immunohematology I 
(3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A study of basic immunohematologic princi- 
ples and their application to the preparation and 
administration of whole blood and blood com- 
ponents. To include the selection and process- 
ing of donors, cross matching procedures, and 
antibody identification. 

MT 350— CJinical Chemistry I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: CHE 342, and MT 360 or per- 
mission of program director. 

A comprehensive study of the physiological 
principles, methodology and clinical signifi- 
cance of the biochemicals and elements found 
in the body fluids. 

MT 360 — Clinical Instrumentation (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A basic study of the principles and operation 
of laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis will be 
placed on the individual components and the 
inter-relationship of the components. Electronics 
will be included. 

MT 370— Clinical Serology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A study of the principles and procedures used 
in the isolation, identification and quantitation of 
diagnostically significant antigens and antibod- 
ies. 

MT 380— Clinical Parasitology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and 
laboratory identification of human parasites. 

MT 390— Clinical Mycology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or 
permission of program director. 

A study of the pathogenesis and laboratory 
isolation and identification of fungi that can in- 
vade humans. 

MT 400— Directed Study (1-5)-0-(1-5) 

Offered on demand with approval of program 
director. 

A study of selected Medical Technology top- 
ics designed to meet the needs of the student. 
Credit will depend upon the work to be done. 
May be repeated up to 10 quarter hours. 



MT 420— Clinical Microbiology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini 
practicum and completion of MT 320. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of s| 
cial topics in microbiology. 

MT 430— Clinical Hematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clini 
practicum and completion of MT 330. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of s 
cial topics in hematology. 

MT 440— Clinical Immunohematology II 
(2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clin 
practicum and completion of MT 340. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of s 
cial topics in immunohematology. 

MT 450— Clinical Chemistry II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clin 
practicum and completion of MT 350. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of s 
cial topics in clinical chemistry. 

MT 411— Phlebotomy Practicum (0-4-1) 

MT 421— Clinical Microbiology Practicum 
(0-16-4) 

MT 431— Clinical Hematology Practicum 
(0-16-4) 

MT 441— Clinicaj Immunohematology 
Practicum (0-8-2) 

MT 451— Clinical Chemistry Practicum 
(d-20-5) 

MT 461— Clinical Urinalysis Practicum 

(0-8-2) 

Total (0-72-18) 

Prerequisites: Completion of respective 
dactive MT courses. 

A structured clinical laboratory experie 
where the students integrate theory and af 
cation under supervision in the identified con 
area. This will provide time and facilities to a 
the students to develop speed, confidence, 
organization and to analyze and solve techr 
problems. 

MT 490— Management and Education 
(2-0-2) 

Basic concepts of laboratory managerr 
leadership and education. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



221 



adiologic Technologies 

culty 

Dson, Sharyn, Program Director 
son, Elwin 

Radiologic Technology is a comprehensive 
-m that is applied to the science of 
ministering ionizing radiation, Radionuclides, 
d other forms of energy to provide technical 
Drmation and assistance to the physician in 
• diagnosis and treatment of diseases and 
jries. This field offers four specific career 
ecialities; radiography, nuclear medicine 
hnology, radiation therapy technology and 
gnostic medical sonography. At present, the 
diologic Technologies Program offers an 
sociate Degree in the specialty area of 
iography. 

>gram Goals 

he specific goals of the Program are as fol- 

s: 
To educate superlative clinicians. In addi- 
tion to mastering basic skills necessary to 
perform routine radiographic examinations, 
the Program's graduate will possess skills 
necessary to perform non-routine and spe- 
cial radiographic procedures. 
To expose the student to an in-depth anal- 
ysis of the art and science of radiography. 
The student will receive not only an indepth 
education to radiography but also in related 
natural and social sciences. 
To give the students a well rounded liberal 
arts education. In addition to the profes- 
sional component of the curriculum, the stu- 
dent receives a well rounded liberal arts 
education in so that the student will be able 
to effectively integrate into society. 

'.fesional Insurance, Transportation 

bcal hospitals are affiliated with the college 
?:he Clinical Education courses. Student ra- 
i^raphers are responsible for providing their 
li transportation. 

nor to matriculation through Clinical Edu- 
< Dn Courses, students are required to submit 

pmpleted health history form and evidence 
f>rofessional liability insurance. Specific in- 
flation regarding these requirements will be 
I touted to students admitted to the Program. 



Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Program, the fol- 
lowing must be maintained: 

1 . Science courses (ZOO 208, 209, 215, CHE 
201, CS 115, PHY 201, 202) 

a. A passing grade in each course ("D" 
or better). 

b. A "C" or better in at least four of these 
courses. 

c. A student may repeat only one of these 
courses. 

d. Students who must repeat more than 
one science course because of grade 
of "F" will be suspended from the Pro- 
gram. 

2. Radiography courses 

a. A "C" or better in each Radiography 
course. 

a. A student may repeat only one Ra- 
diography course. 

c. Students who must repeat more than 
one Radiography course will be dis- 
missed from the Program. 

3. The maintenance of an overall grade point 
average of 2.0 is required throughout the 
program. When a student falls below the 
adjusted GPA of 2.0, the student will be 
placed on probation, suspended, or dis- 
missed after a review by the faculty of the 
Program. 

4. Conditionally accepted students must have 
a GPA of 2.0 by the end of the second 
quarter of matriculation through the pro- 
gram or after completion of 30-45 quarter 
hours. In the event the conditionally ac- 
cepted student does not achieve the afore- 
mentioned requirements, he or she will be 
dismissed from the program. 

Attendance and Advanced Standing 

A student must matriculate each quarter, in- 
cluding Summer Quarter, to remain in the Pro- 
gram. If, because of illness or other extenuating 
circumstances, a student must be away from 
school for a quarter, the student must seek for- 
mal approval from the Program Director for such 
an absence. If such approval is not sought and 
granted, the student will be dropped from active 
status and must reapply for admission before 
continuing in the Program 

The Radiologic Technologies Program is 
committed to a philosophy of educational flexi- 
bility to meet the needs of the profession. Indi- 
viduals who are graduates of Certificate 
(hospital) Programs and working in the profes- 



222 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



sion who are certified by the American Registry 
of Radiologic Technologists may receive ad- 
vanced standing by a process of exemption ex- 
aminations and CLEP examinations. These 
individuals may be awarded Credit-By-Exami- 
nation up to 71 quarter hours for previous 
professional education. Please contact the Pro- 
gram Director for details. 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGIC 
TECHNOLOGIES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 33 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

Area II 5 

MAT 101 5 

Area III 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS113 5 

ArealV 5 

CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

Any three physical education 

credits 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 71 

RAD 104, 111, 112, 113, 114, 

121, 122, 123 29 

RAD 200, 201, 202, 203, 205, 

221, 222, 223, 224, 225 42 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

CS 115 5 

ZOO 208, 209, 215 15 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 124 



Radiologic Technologies Offerings 

RAD 104 — Principles of Radiographic 
Exposure (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Pro- 
gram. 

Factors influencing radiographic quality and 
conditions influencing exposures are presented. 
Attenuating devices, beam restricting devices, 
and accessory equipment are demonstrated. 
Technic charts and formation are vehicles for 
the application of the radiographic process. 



RAD 111 — Radiographic Procedures and 
Radiation Protection (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the P 
gram. 

This course introduces the student to i 
basic theory and principles of radiographic p 
cedures of the extremities, shoulder girdle, a 
pelvic girdle. Emphasis is placed on osteo ar 
omy, spatial relationships, patient position'n 
equipment manipulation, and quality evaluat 
of the radiographic study. Basic medical 1 
minology will be included. 

RAD 112— Radiographic Procedures II 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the F 
gram and RAD 111. 

The theory and principles of radiographic 
aminations of the chest and abdomen are st'i 
ied. Emphasis is placed on radiograpl 
examinations of the visceral organs requiring 
use of contrast media, spatial relationships, | 
tient positioning, equipment manipulation, c 
quality evaluation of the study. 

RAD 113 — Radiographic Procedures III 
(4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the F 
gram and RAD 112. 

The theory and principles of radiographic 
aminations of the spines, facial bones and ci 
ium are studied. Emphasis is placed on 
osteo anatomy, spatial relationships, patient 
sitioning, equipment manipulation, and qu, 
evaluation of the study. 

RAD 114— Radiographic Procedures IV 
(3.5-1.5-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the 
gram and RAD 113. 

The theory and principles of non-routine 
diographic examinations are studied. Topic: 
eluded are studied of the neurovascular sysl 
central nervous system, heart, breast, re 
ductive organs, and additional non-routine 
aminations involving contrast medici 
specialized instrumentation. Emphasis wil 
given to preparation of special procedi 
suites, sterile technique, and utilization of sf! 
ialized equipment. 

RAD 121— Clinical Education I (0-8-1) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the 
gram, permission of the instructor, and CPR 
tified. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 



223 



Orientation to patient care, introduction to 
eas involving the field of radiology, and ori- 
ltation to the clinical setting are presented, 
is is a supervised clinical practice in perform- 
g radiographic procedures, radiation protec- 
m, patient care, equipment orientation, 
diographic technique, darkroom procedures, 
id film quality evaluation. Competency evalu- 
on of routine radiographic examinations is in- 
jded. 

\D 122— Clinical Education II (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 121 and permission of the 
jtructor. 

This is a supervised clinical practice in per- 
ming radiographic procedures with an em- 
asis on the competency evaluation of routine 
jiographic examinations. 

<D 123 — Clinical Education III (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 122 and permission of the 
;tructor. RAD 104 and RAD 1 13 must be taken 
a corequisite or prerequisite. 
This course is a supervised clinical practice 
performing radiographic procedures with an 
lphasis on the competency evaluation of rou- 
3 radiographic examinations. 

\D 200 — Nursing Procedures (1.5-1.5-2) 

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Pro- 
j am. 

■ The student is introduced to basic nursing 
I :hniques as they relate to the patient in the 
1 diology Department. Topics included are 
] /etiological needs of patients, meeting phys- 
i I requirements of patients, transporting and 
i >ving of patients, monitoring of patients, suc- 
I ling, catherization, administration of injec- 
Ims, I.V. maintenance, and dealing with 
Mergency medical situations. 

WD 201/202— Radiation Science I & II 
12-5) 

:( Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Permission of the 
Jtructor 

■(This course deals with the application of ra- 
lition physics as it relates to the production, 
jbpagation and detection of electromagnetic 
:Hd particulate radiation. Emphasis will be given 
•flmechanisms describing the interaction of X- 
r s with matter, photographic and electronic 
i age detection, electronic circuitry, and the 
.fiysical function of associated radiographic 
e Jipment. 

TD 203— Radiobiology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: RAD 202, ZOO 209 or permis- 
Sn of instructor 



This course is designed to give the radiog- 
raphy student an understanding of the effects 
of radiation exposure, dose limits, and structural 
protection requirements. Topics included will be 
somatic and genetic effects of radiation expo- 
sure, measurement and protection methods, 
plus NCRP and BRH standards. 

RAD 205— Quality Assurance (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a study of equipment testing 
and instrumentation, record keeping systems, 
and statistical analysis of equipment and supply 
usage. Emphasis will be given to testing pro- 
cedures. QA program implementation, and fed- 
eral government guidelines. 

RAD 221— Clinical Education IV (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 123 and permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of ra- 
diographic examinations. 

RAD 222— Clinical Education V (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 221 and permission of in- 
structor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of ra- 
diographic examinations. 

RAD 223— Clinical Education VI (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 222 and permission of the 
instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of ra- 
diographic examinations. 

RAD 224— Clinical Education VII (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 223 and permission of in- 
structor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures with an 
emphasis on the competency evaluation of ra- 
diographic examinations. 

RAD 225— Clinical Education VIII 
(6-32-12) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all re- 
quired Radiologic Technologies courses or per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice 
in performing radiographic procedures and an 
exposure to various specialized areas within the 
profession of Radiologic Technology. Emphasis 
is placed on the competency evaluation of ra- 



224 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



diographic examinations and demonstration of 
radiographic examinations and demonstration 
of basic skills in various specialized areas within 
the profession. Course includes seminar in 
which pertinent professional topics and the tran- 
sition from student to graduate technologist will 
be discussed. 



Respiratory Therapy 

Faculty 

Bowers, Ross, Department Head 

Di Benedetto, Robert, Co-Medical Director 

Mazzoli, Andrew, Director of Clinical 

Education 

Morris, Stephen, Co-Medical Director 

Smith, William 



For the two-year (seven consecutive quarters) 
program leading to the Associate in Science de- 
gree in Respiratory Therapy, the student must 
complete a curriculum of 64 quarter hours in 
academic courses and 64 quarter hours within 
the major. The A.S. degree from an accredited 
Respiratory Therapy program qualifies the grad- 
uate for entry into the Registry credentialing sys- 
tem. The Registry is the highest professional 
creditial available in the field of respiratory ther- 
apy. The credentialing process is a two-step na- 
tionally administered examination. Step 1 is a 
comprehensive written exam to be taken shortly 
after graduation. The graduate who passes this 
exam will earn the entry level credential C.R.T.T. 
and will be eligible to enter the registry creden- 
tialing system. The registry exam consists of a 
written and a clinical simulation component. The 
candidate who passes both parts of the registry 
exam will earn the credential Registered Res- 
piratory Therapist. 

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 

For progression through the Associate De- 
gree Program in Respiratory Therapy, the fol- 
lowing must be maintained: 
1. Courses Related to the Major (CHE 201, 
202, ZOO 208, 209, 21 1 , BIO 21 and HS 
110) 

a. A student may carry no more 
than one grade of less than "C" 

b. A grade of "F" must be repeated 
the next quarter that the course 
is offered 



c. A student must have success- 
fully completed the require- 
ments for Che 202 and ZOO 21 1 
by the end of the summer 
quarter of the freshman year. 
Failure to comply with this re- 

• quirement will result in suspen- 
sion from the program. A 
student suspended from the 
program will be eligible for read- 
mission 

d. A student who must repeat more 
than one course because of a 
grade of "F" will be dismissed 
from the program with no option 
for readmission 

2. Courses in the Respiratory Therapy Ma 

a. A grade of "C" or better is re- 
quired for each course that is a 
prerequisite for a subsequent 
course. Failure to comply with 
this requirement will result in 
suspension from the program. 

b. A student who earns a grade of 
less than "C" must repeat that 
course the next quarter it is of- 
fered. 

c. A student may repeat a respi- 
ratory therapy course oniy once. 

d. A student may repeat only one 
respiratory therapy course. 

e. Students who must repeat a res- 
piratory therapy course more 
than one time will be dismissed 
from the program with no option 
for readmission. 

f. Students who must repeat more 
than one respiratory therapy 
course will be dismissed from 
the program with no option for 
readmission. 

3. Grade Point Average 

The maintenance of a 2.0 GPA is desire; 
throughout the respiratory therapy ; 
gram. Students who fall below 2.0 are s 
ject to the academic status classifies' 
identified in the Academic Regulations ? 
ti'on of this catalogue. Students placeo 
academic Warning who do not raise U 
GPA to the minimum criteria for acad€» 
Good Standing the subsequent quarter 
be suspended from the program until si 
time they return to Good Standing. Cou 3 
used to raise the GPA must be apprc? 1 
by their academic advisor. 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 



225 



Regents Exam 

Successful completion of the Regent's 
Exam is a requirement for all students re- 
ceiving a degree from the University Sys- 
tem of Georgia. The School of Health 
Professions requires that a student must 
have passed both parts of the Regent's 
Exam prior to their last quarter in their ma- 
jor. Failure to comply with this requirement 
will result in suspension from the program 
until such time that the exam is successfully 
completed. 
Exit Exam 

The University System of Georgia requires 
that all students take a comprehensive Exit 
Exam in their major field. The department 
of respiratory therapy uses a nationally val- 
idated exam for this purpose. The exit exam 
is. administered during the spring quarter 
of the sophomore year. All students are re- 
quired to earn a grade of 70% prior to the 
end of the spring quarter. 



DGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF 
SOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN RESPIRATORY 
ERAPY 

HOURS 

General Requirements 64 

Area I: Humanities 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II: Mathematics and Natural Sci- 
ences 

1. MATH 101 5 

Area Ml: Social Sciences 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS 113 5 

3. PSY 101 or SOC201 or ANT 

201 5 

Area IV: Courses Related to Major 
Field 

1. CHE 201, 202 10 

1 2 ZOO 208, 209, 211 13 

3. BIO210 5 

4. HS110 3 

Area V: Physical Education 

1. PE 1 17 or 166 2 

2. PE Activity Course 1 

Courses in the Major Field 64 

1. RT 110, 102, 111, 121, 112 28 

I 2 RT210, 211, 221, 212, 213,222, 

206, 223, 214 36 

^Regent's and National Standanzed 
Self Assess Exams 



OFFERINGS 

RT 110 — Patient Assessment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 208, CHE 201 

Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 110 is to teach the 
student the assessment skills required to eval- 
uate and develop a respiratory care plan. By the 
completion of RT 110 the student will be able 
to: review the medical record, conduct a patient 
interview, perform a physical examination of the 
chest, monitor and interpret vital signs, perform 
ventilatory monitoring procedures, interpret ar- 
terial blood gases and interpret the chest xray. 
The content of RT 110 is essential fo the stu- 
dent's progression to the clinical phase of the 
curriculum. 

RT 113 — Respiratory Therapy Equipment 
(2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 201, RT 110 

Corequisite: CHE 202 

Offered: Winter Quarter 

A course designed to focus on the technology 
and equipment used in providing respiratory 
care. The student will be able to select and ob- 
tain equipment appropriate to the care plan, as- 
semble and check for proper function and 
identify and correct equipment malfunctions. 
Quality control and asepsis procedures will also 
be emphasized. 

RT 114 — General Patient Care (3-2-4) 

Prerequisite: RT 110, 113 

Corequisite: RT 102, 120 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

A course designed to focus on implementa- 
tion and evaluation of the respiratory care plan. 
The student will develop the cognitive and tech- 
nical skills necessary to initiate and evaluate the 
patient's response to: 02 therapy, CPR, aerosol 
and humidity therapy, bronchial hygiene, IPPB 
therapy and airway care. A protocol for initia- 
ting a change in the care plan will also be 
emphasized 

RT 120— Applied Patient Care (0-8-2) 

Prerequisite: RT 110, 113 

Corequisite: RT 1 14 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

A clinical practicum designed to orient the 
student to the hospital environment Basic as- 
sessment skills and 02 rounds will be empha- 
sized. Students will also participate in the 
cleaning, sterilization, assembly, and routine 
maintenance of equipment. 



TOTAL 



128 



226 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RT 102— Pulmonary Pharmacology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 208, CHE 201, RT 110 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

This course is designed to give the student 
an in-depth look at drugs that directly affect the 
pulmonary system, During this course the stu- 
dent will study: route of drug administration, 
pharmacodynamics, drug interactions, mucok- 
inesis and mocokinetic drugs, bronchospasm 
and bronchodilators, cholinergic drugs cromo- 
lyn sodium, corticosteroids, antibiotics, antiti- 
berculan drugs, respiratory stimulants and 
depressants, anesthetics and neuromuscular 
blockers. 

RT 121— Applied Respiratory Care I (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 111, RT 102. 

Offered: Summer Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 121 is to provide the 
student sufficient opportunities to apply the cog- 
nitive, affective and psychomotor skills devel- 
oped in RT 1 1 and RT 1 1 1 in the clinical setting. 
By the completion of this course the student will 
be able to: collect data necessary for devel- 
oping the care plan, implement the prescribed 
care plan, evaluate the patient's response to 
therapy and modify or recommend modification 
of the care plan based on patient response. By 
the completion of RT 1 21 the student will be able 
to demonstrate problem solving skills in the clin- 
ical setting. The clinical competencies devel- 
oped in RT 121 are a prerequisite for 
progression to the critical care component of the 
curriculum. 

RT 112— Diagnostic Procedures (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 21 1 , RT 1 1 1 , RT 1 02. 

Offered: Summer Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 112 is to teach the 
student the cognitive and psychomotor skills 
necessary to perform or assist the physician in 
performing diagnostic procedures in the blood 
gas, pulmonary function and cardiovascular 
labs. The student will also develop competen- 
cies in cardiovascular assessment. By the com- 
pletion of this course the student will be able to 
interpret diagnostic data and apply it to patient 
care. 

RT 210— Pulmonary Medicine (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 112, RT 121, BIO 210 

Offered: Fall Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 210 is to provide the 
student a basic foundation in pulmonary pa- 
thology and clinical medicine. The course is pri- 
marily taught by physicians in the community. 
By the completion of this course the student will 



have an understanding of the etiology, ep 
miology, pathophysiology, presenting sy 
toms, clinical manifestations, diagno 
complications, medical management and p 
nosis associated with acute and chronic dise 
of the lungs. The course will focus primaril; 
conditions seen outside of the critical care 
emergency medicine area. 

RT 211— Adult Critical Care I (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 112,, RT 121 

Offered: Fall Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 21 1 is to teach 
student the cognitive and psychomotor s 
necessary to establish and maintain the pat 
ventilator system. Emphasis will be on kn 
edge of ventilatory support equipmentas we 
techniques for initiation assessment modi' 
tion and discontinuation of ventilatory sup 
systems. The content of RT 21 1 is essentia 
progression to RT 212. 

RT 221— Applied Respiratory Care II 
(0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 112, RT 121 

Offered: Fall Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 221 is to provide 
student sufficient opportunities to apply the c 
nitive, affective and psychomotor skills de 
oped in RT 1 1 2 and RT 21 1 in the clinical sett 
Emphasis will be placed on developing clir 
competencies in the ICU, diagnostic lab 
operating room setting. 

RT 212— Adult Critical Care II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, RT 221 

Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 212 is to teach 
student how to evaluate the effect of m'echar 
ventilation on other organs or body systems 
to apply that knolwedge to the total care ol 
patient. The student will develop a broader t 
for understanding the total patient care p 
Emphasis will be placed on hemodynamic r 
itoring, critical care pharmacology, fluid' 
ance, shock and trauma. 

RT 213— Emergency Care (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 21 1 , RT 221 

Offered: Winter Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 21 3 is to focus on i 
and pediatric pathologic states that may pre 
as an acute life threatening emergency, 
phasis is placed on assessment, rapid re 
nition, intervention and medical managen 
By the completion of this course the studen 
have the cognitive skills required to impler 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 



227 



r assist in implementing appropriate therapeu- 
: procedures in an emergency setting. 

T 222— Applied Respiratory Care III 
1-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 211. RT 221 
Offered: Winter Quarter 
The primary goal of RT 222 is to provide the 
udent with sufficient opportunities to apply the 
xjnitive, affective and psychomotor skills de- 
)loped in RT 211, RT 212 and RT 213 to the 
ire of the critically ill patient. The emphasis will 
? placed on patient monitoring and evaluating 
e effect of therapeutic procedures on other 
gans or body systems. The student will begin 
i orientation rotation to the Pediatric and Neo- 
itallCUs during this course. 

r 206— Perinatal Care (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 212, RT 213, RT 222 
Offered: Winter Quarter 
The primary goal of RT 206 is to teach the 
jdent the cognitive, affective and psychom- 
)r skills necessary to care for the critically ill 
•diatnc patient and neonate. Emphasis will be 
aced on knowledge of ventilatory support 
uipment as well as techniques for initiation 
sessment, modification and discontinuation of 
ntilatory support systems. The student will 
;o study embryology, assessment of the fetus 
utero, complicated pregnancies and deliv- 
es. resuscitation of the newborn and abnor- 
\\ pathophysiologic states. 



RT 223— Applied Respiratory Care IV 
(0-24-6) 

Prerequisites: RT 212, RT 213, RT 222 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 223 is to provide the 
student with sufficient opportunities to apply 
cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills in the 
care of the critically ill neonate and pediatric 
patient. Emphasis will be placed on care of pa- 
tients requiring ventilatory support. Students will 
continue to develop their skills in the adult crit- 
ical care unit. The student will also be oriented 
to the care of the chronically ill patient in the 
home or secondary care facility. 

RT 214 — Seminar in Respiratory Care 
(2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: RT 212, RT 213, RT 222 

Offered: Spring Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 214 is to provide an 
open forum for discussion of contemporary is- 
sues facing the profession and the health care 
delivery system. Topics to be discussed include 
credentialing, gerontology and the health care 
needs of the elderly, the shift in focus from pri- 
mary to secondary care facilities, care of ven- 
tilator dependent patients in the home and the 
impact of DRG's and the prospective payment 
system on the traditional respiratory care 
service. 



228 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




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230 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Freshman Experience 

Freshman Orientation Program — ASC 101 

In order to assist freshman students in making 
the transition to college, the college encourages 
new students to enroll in ASC 101. In addition 
to the course content, enrolled students will re- 
ceive special advising and other services. The 
course is described as follows: 

ASC 101 — College: Strategies for Success 
(3-0-3) 

This course aims to provide the student with 
the skills, information, and guidance useful for 
success in college. It will focus on the purposes 
of higher education, the roles of the student, and 
the resources available within the college for 
academic success and career choices. 



Policies of the Developmental 
Studies Program 

Every time a Developmental Studies stude 
registers or preregisters until exiting the Deve 
opmental Studies Program, he/she must ha\ 
his/her class schedule approved by a Dew 
opmental Studies advisor or the Development 
Studies Counselor. 

The student is permitted four attempts to e: 
a Developmental Studies area. If a student fa 
to exit an area after the fourth attempt, he/st 
will be subject to Developmental Studies su 
pension. 

A complete list of Developmental Studies Pr 
gram Policies is available in the Department 
Developmental Studies. 



Developmental Studies 

Faculty 

Geoffroy, Cynthia 
Harris, Karl 
Smith, Carolyn 

The. Department of Developmental Studies 
provides a program of compensatory education 
for students whose academic deficiencies may 
prevent successful completion of collegiate 
studies. Students may be placed in departmen- 
tal courses on the basis of the Collegiate Place- 
ment Examination, or Regents Test 
performances. Regularly admitted students may 
voluntarily enroll, subject to prerequisites, in any 
departmental courses. Conditionally admitted 
students must enroll in accordance with the stip- 
ulations of their admission (see the Conditional 
Admission section of this Catalog) and policies 
of the Developmental Studies program. (See 
next section.) 

Those entitled to Veterans Administration ed- 
ucational benefits may be certified for no more 
than 45 credit hours in departmental courses, if 
these cousres are required for regular admis- 
sion. At most, 15 hours may be certified in each 
of the English, mathematics, and reading areas. 



OFFERINGS 

DSE 098— Grammar Review (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for the student who needs 
review grammar fundamentals, to improve se 
tence writing skills, and to develop paragraph 
The student works toward competence in se 
tence construction, verb use, determination 
subject-verb agreement, formation of posses 
ives, punctuation, and other basics. Along w 
reviewing grammar, the student engages in e 
tensive writing practice, including senten* 
building, sentence combining, and paragra 
writing. 

DSE 099— Basic Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies P 
icies above. 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
This course is for the student who has alrea 
mastered the basic skills of composition but w 
needs additional practice in developing the j 
say. It will help the student construct more rr 
ture and sophisticated sentence patten 
create coherent and well developed pa 
graphs, and organize paragraphs into essa^ 

DSM 098— Introductory Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review of arithmetic 
tegrated into an introductory algebra cour 
Topics include negative integers, simple p(.- 
nomials, integer exponents, equations, w«: 
problems, factoring, some graphing, and sim 
radicals. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



231 



SM 099— Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Pol- 
ies above. 

Topics include rational expressions, factoring 
; polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, 
raphs of linear functions, rational exponents, 
id radicals. 

SR 098— Reading Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
This course is appropriate for students ex- 
sriencing difficulty in reading. Word attack 
(ills, comprehension skills, and vocabulary 
jilding are stressed. 

3R 025 — Developing Reading Maturity 
-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 
This course is appropriate for students pre- 
iring for the Regents. Examination, for stu- 
Bnts undergoing remediation due to 
lsuccessful performance on the reading por- 
»n of the Regents Examination, and for stu- 
jnts expenencing moderate difficulty in 
ading. Comprehension skills, vocabulary en- 
:hment, test-taking strategies, and reading 
lency are stressed. 

5S 099 — Effective Study Techniques 
-2-2) 

Offered on demand. 

The purpose of this course is development of 
stematic and efficient study habits for aca- 
?mic success. Special emphasis will be 
aced on time management listening skills, 
emory techniques, reading flexibility, note-tak- 
g systems, textbook mastery, and test-taking 
r ategies. 



lilitary Science 

Uculty 

IcManus, William, Captain, Department Head 
ierrell, Keith, Captain 
cAdams, George, Master Sergeant 



• The Army Department of Military Science is a 
!?nior Division Reserve Officer Training Corps 
HOTC), Instructor Group, staffed by active 
'my personnel. The department provides a 
jrnculum available to Armstrong State and Sa- 
*nnah State students that qualifies the college 
aduate for a commission as an officer in the 



United States Army, United States Army Re- 
serve, or the United States National Guard. 
Qualifying for a commission adds an extra di- 
mension to the student's employment capability 
in that, upon graduation from the college, the 
student has either military or civilian employment 
options. 

The course of study offered in military science 
is designed not only to prepare both the student 
for service as a commissioned officer in the 
United States Army but also to provide knowl- 
edge and practical experience in leadership 
and management that will be useful in any facet 
of society. Male and female students are eligible 
for enrollment. Each student is provided with a 
working knowledge of the organization and 
functioning of the Department of Defense and 
the role of the U.S. Army in national security and 
world affairs. 

The course of study pursued by students dur- 
ing their freshman and sophomore years is the 
basic military science course and/or related skill 
activities. The course of study normally pursued 
by students during their junior and senior years 
is the advanced military science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced 
course, a student must be physically qualified, 
should have maintained above average military 
and academic standing, and must demonstrate 
a potential for further leadership development. 

Graduates of the advanced course are com- 
missioned second lieutenants in the United 
States Army Reserve in the branch of service 
most appropriate to their interests and aca- 
demic achievements, consistent with the needs 
of the Army. Regardless of the Branch selected, 
all officers will receive valuable experience in 
management, logistics and administration. 
Graduates may be granted a delay in reporting 
for duty for graduate study, if requested A small 
number of outstanding students are designated 
Distinguished Military Graduates and are of- 
fered commissions in the Regular Army each 
year. 

Basic Military Science 

Basic military science courses involve six 
quarters during the freshman and sophomore 
years. The student learns leadership and man- 
agement and acquires essential background 
knowledge of customs and traditions, weapons, 
map reading, tactics and survival. Equally im- 
portant, these courses have the objective of de- 
veloping the student's self-discipline, integrity 
and sense of responsibility. 



232 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of instruc- 
tion is to produce junior officers who by edu- 
cation, training, attitude and inherent qualities 
are suitable for continued development as offi- 
cers in the Army. There are two avenues avail- 
able for the student to be eligible for entry into 
the advanced program and obtain a commis- 
sion as a second lieutenant. 

(a) satisfactory completion of, or placement 
credit for, the basic program at Armstrong State 
or at any other school, college or university of- 
fering basic ROTC and meeting the entrance 
and retention requirements established by the 
Army. 

(b) to be an active duty veteran or junior ROTC 
cadet graduate eligible for placement credit. 

Placement 

Veterans entering the military science pro- 
grams will receive appropriate placement credit 
for their active military service. Students who 
have completed military science courses in mil- 
itary preparatory schools or junior colleges may 
be given appropriate credit. Students with at 
least three years of high school ROTC may also 
be granted placement credit. Placement credit 
or six quarters of basic military science, or the 
equivalent thereof, is a prerequisite to admission 
into the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two years of coursework re- 
maining, but who have not completed basic mil- 
itary science, are eligible to be considered for 
selection into the advanced military science pro- 
gram. Those selected under the provisions of 
the two-year advanced program must satisfac- 
torily complete a basic summer camp of six 
weeks duration prior to entering the advanced 
program. Students attending the basic camp at 
Fort Knox, Kentucky, are paid at active army 
rates and given a travel allowance from their 
home to camp and return. Attendance at Basic 
Camp is voluntary and incurs no military obli- 
gation until the student returns and decides to 
sign a contract to pursue his commission. 

Participating Students and Aliens 

Some students and aliens may participate in 
the Advanced Course classes provided they 
meet the requirements outlined in Army Regu- 
lations. They receive no subsistence allowance 
and may only participate in classroom instruc- 



tion. For specific details on this program, s< 
the Department Head before registering for 
course. 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advano 
courses are required to attend advanced sui 
mer camp, normally between their junior ai 
senior academic years at Fort Riley, Kansc' 
Students attending this camp are paid at acti 
army rates and given travel allowance from th 
home to camp and return. 

Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced cadets are paid 
subsistence allowance of $100 per month wri 
enrolled in the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two- a 
three-year scholarships to outstanding you 
men and women participating in the Army RO" 
program who desire careers as Army office 
The Army pays tuition, fees, books and lat 
ratory expenses incurred by the scholarship s 
dent. In addition, each student receives $1 
per month for the academic year. Individu; 
desiring to compete for these scholarshi 
should apply to the Military Science Departme 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplie 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC progn 
will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, books a 
supplies by the Military Science Department, 
fees or deposits of any kind will be require 
Uniforms must be returned before commissi 
ing or upon disenrollment from the ROTC p 
gram. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of six quarters duration c< 
sists of two hours of classroom work per we 
In the classroom, the student acquires knp 
edge of military leadership, weapons, tacti 
basic military skills, and physical fitness. In.fi 
training exercises, potential for leadership 
progressively developed. 

The advanced course consists of three ho | 
of classroom work and one hour of leaders' 
laboratory per week. During the spring qua 
prior to advanced camp the student will er 
in MIL 303 to prepare for attendance at 
vanced Camp. HIS 357 (American Military r| 
tory) is normally taken spring quarter of 
senior year. The coursework during the 
vanced course emphasizes techniques ci 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



233 



lanagement and leadership and the funda- 
lentals and dynamics of the military team. Field 
aining exercises provide the student with ap- 
lied leadership experiences. 

linor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in Military Sci- 
nce. The program is designed to prepare the 
udent for a commission in the United States 
rmy and is offered to, but not required of, those 
udents participating in the advanced course 
: Army ROTC instruction. Whatever the major, 
Military Science minor will strengthen the stu- 
snt's management, leadership, and interper- 
xial communication skills. The minor requires: 
Fourteen credit hours with grades of "C" or 
atter in the following upper division military sci- 
ice courses: 301 , 302, 303, 401 , 402; HIS 357 
id five additional credit hours of coursework 
^proved by the Department Head. 

FFERINGS 

IL 101— Army Leadership (1-1-2) 

A study of the various aspects of leadership 
DCtrine and how to apply the doctrine in various 
tutations. 

IL 102— Basic Weapons (1-1-2) 

I A study of characteristics of basic military 
eapons with emphasis on the principles and 
' ndamentals of rifle marksmanship. The stu- 
lents will have an opportunity to fire selected 
'eapons at a U.S. Army installation. 

IL 103— Basic Survival (2-0-2) 

. A study and practical exercise introducing 

, ilitary techniques used to sustain human life 

hen separated from logistical support. A field 

p for qualified students is used to enable them 

i practice techniques learned. 

1 IL 201— Map Reading and Land 
avigation (1-1-2) 

; Prerequisite: MIL 101, 102, 103, or approval 
' Department Head. 

A study of basic map reading as applied by 

e small unit leader. 

IL 202— Basic Tactics and Operations 
-1-2) 

, Prerequisite: MIL 101, 102, 103, 201, or ap- 

oval of Department Head. 
, A study of small unit tactics, operations and 

oop leading procedures to include the com- 

ned arms teams to the platoon with primary 

terest on the rifle squad. 



MIL 203 — Mountaineering Techniques 
(2-0-2) 

Prerequisites: MIL 101, 103, 201, 202, or ap- 
proval of Department Head. 

A study and practical exercise introducing the 
fundamentals of rappelling, first aid, knot tying, 
and safety. A field trip to utilize skills is included. 
Acceptable as a P.E. requirement. 

MIL 206— Basic Self-Defense I (0-2-1) 

Prerequisites: MIL 103 or 203, or approval of 
Department Head. 

A basic self-defense course which provides 
a study of defensive philosophy, vulnerable 
areas of the body, exercises, kicks, strikes, 
throws, and arm bars. The course also includes 
basic self-defense strategy and practical exer- 
cises utilizing all of the techniques taught in the 
course. Acceptable as P.E. requirement. 

MIL 301 — Leadership and Management I 
(3-1-3) 

Prerequisites: Basic Course or equivalent and 
approval of Department Head. Participating and 
alien students who qualify must have the ap- 
proval of the Department Head and the U.S. 
Army ROTC Cadet Command. 

A study of the psychology of leadership, tech- 
niques of management, and methods of instruc- 
tion to include practical application. 

MIL 302 — Fundamentals and Dynamics of 
the Military Team I (3-1-3) 

Prerequisites: Basic Course or equivalent and 
approval of Department Head. Participating and 
alien students who qualify must have the ap- 
proval of the Department Head and the U.S. 
Army ROTC Cadet Command. 

A study of tactics applied at the platoon and 
company level to include a study of the modern 
battlefield and current military tactical doctrine. 

MIL 303— Leadership Seminar (3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: MIL 301, 302. 

A series of seminars, laboratories and expe- 
riences to prepare the student for Advanced 
Summer Camp. 

MIL 304— Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: Military 303 and per- 
mission of Department. 

The study and practical application of military 
skills and leadership ability during a six week 
encampment experience. Grading for this 
course will be done on a satisfactory, unsatis- 
factory basis. Instruction and evaluation is jointly 
accomplished by college staff and selected 
ROTC personnel assigned to 3rd Region. 



234 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MIL 401— Fundamentals and Dynamics of 
the Military Team II (3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: MIL 301, 302. 

A study of command and staff duties and re- 
sponsibilities of the professional officer to in- 
clude operations, intelligence, administration 
and logistics. 

MIL 402 — Leadership and Management 
(3-1-3) 

Prerequisite: MIL 301, 302. 
A study of the military justice system and serv- 
ice orientation. 



Naval ROTC Program 

Faculty 

Cdr. Edward Clark Jr., USN, Department Head 

LtCol Ronald L. Taylor, USMC 

CAPT Eddie Bickham, USMC 

LT Tracy Adams, USN 

LT Jerry A. Dab, USN 

LT Cranford R. Coleman, USN 

LTJG Leonard Williams, USN 

NCCS Archie L. Sanders, USN 

YNC(SS) Donald W. Sugg, USN 

SKC Stephen A. Floyd, USN 

GYSGT Willie G. Medley, USMC 



General 

Naval Reserve Offecer's Training Corps 
(NROTC) prepares students for commissioned 
service as regular or reserve officers in the Navy 
or Marine Corps. 

Students enrolled in NROTC are referred to 
as Midshipmen (MIDN) or as Naval Science Stu- 
dents (NSS) and are classified based on Naval 
Science academic status as follows: 

ASC Student NROTC Midshipmen 

Senior 1/C (First Class) 

Junior 2/C (Second Class) 

Sophomore 3/C (Third Class) 

Freshman 4/C (Fourth Class) 



Naval Science Curriculum 



Basic Program 

ALL MIDSHIPMEN 

Houn 

A. Naval Science 11 

NSC 101-102, 104 8 

NSC 203, 204 10 

Advanced Program 

B. Navy Option 

Naval Science 2l 

NSC 301-302, 304-305-306 18 

NSC 401-402-403-404-405 8 

C. Marine Corps Option 

Naval Science 1; 

NSC 307-308-309 6 

NSC 406-407 6 

D. Additional Requirements 

NSC 450 Naval Drill (0-2-0), required eacl 
academic term by all midshipmen. NSC 
301, 302, and 450 satisfies 3 quarters (i 
hours) of Physical Education requirements 

E. Navy Scholarship Midshipmen 

(1) Requirements 5; 

Math 206-207-208 (to be completed b 

end of Sophomore Year) 1 

Physics 217-218-219 (to be complete 

by the end of Junior Year) 1 

Computer Science 136 or 142 

or 246 .... 

Must complete 2 quarters from the 

following list of courses: 1' 

HIS 251 or HIS 252 and HIS 357 

POS 113 and PSC 201 (SSC) 

Must complete one academic term in a mc 

jor Indo-European or Asian Language prk 

to commissioning 

(2) Navy Option in a non-technical curricui 
shall complete a sufficient number < 
technical electives from the below list 1 
comprise 50 percent of all electives nt 
required by the academic major o| 
NROTC Program. Calculus and Physic 
courses count towards satisfying this r< 
quirement: 

Business (SSC): BAD 331, 332, 416 
Chemistry: any listed course 
Math, Physics, Physical Science: ar 
listed courses except Math 290, 39 
and 393. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



235 



Computer Science: CS 130, 142, 246 
Engineering Courses: Any listed 
course except EGR 100, 170. 171 

Navy College Program Midshipmen (non- 
cholarship). Must complete 1 year of Math, 
ollege algebra or higher, by the end of the Jun- 
)r Year and 1 year Physical Science by the end 
f the Senior Year as a preprequisite for com- 
lissioning. The Physical Science requirement 
an be met by completing a one-year sequence, 
r two courses, in any area of physical science. 
)ne Mathematics course may be selected from 
le fields of computer science or statistics. 

Marine Corps Option. All students shall take, 
uring the Junior or Senior year, HIS 357 and 
SC 201 (SSC). (Courses must be approved by 
le Marine Corps Officer Instructor and should 
ot create an academic overload (increase time 
squired for degree completion/commissioning 
nd/or require student to carry more than 18 
ours). 

omprehensive Examination/Competency 
leasurement Exam (CME) 

The CME Program consists of one cumulative 
omprehensive exam. The exam is adminis- 
^red to MIDN each Fall Quarter. Successful 
ompletion of the CME is required. 

ROTC Uniforms, Books, and instructional 
laterials 

Will be issued at no cost to Naval Science 
tudents. Uniforms must be returned before 
ommissioning or upon disenrollment from the 
iROTC Program; books and other instructional 
laterials must be returned at the end of each 
cademic term. 

cholarship Program 

Two and three-and-a-half year scholarships 
,iat pay tuition, fees, books and laboratory ex- 

enses, in addition, scholarship midshipmen 
i( lso receive a $100 per month tax free stipend 
, uring the academic year. 

inancial Assistance 

All midshipmen in the advanced NROTC Pro- 
ram (Junior and Senior Years) are paid a $100 
er month tax free subsistance allowance (same 
s $100 per month stipend for scholarship mid- 
hipmen). 

iummer Training Cruises 

All scholarship midshipmen will go on Sunn- 
ier Training Cruises each year. While on sum- 



mer training, midshipmen will be paid active 
duty Navy rates and will be provided travel, 
room and board at government expense. 

4 and 2-Year NROTC Programs 

4-year program students enroll in the program 
as Freshmen and participate until graduation. 

2-year program students enter the program 
after they complete approximately 90 hours (end 
of Sophomore year) and complete a six-week 
professional, academic, and physical training 
program conducted each summer by the Navy, 
normally in Newport, Rl and referred to as Naval 
Science Institute (NSI). Academic work at the 
Naval Science Institute is the equivalent of the 
NROTC basic course and 18 hours of credit will 
be given to students who successfully complete 
NSI. 

Naval Science Offerings 

NSC 101— Introduction to Naval Science I 
(1-0-1) 

Fall, Spring. 

Introduce midshipmen to NROTC Program 
mission, organization, regulations, and broad 
warfare components of the Naval Service. In- 
cluded is an overview of officer and enlisted rank 
and rating structure, training and education, 
promotion and advancement, and retirement 
policies. The course also covers the basic te- 
nents of Naval courtesy and customs, and Naval 
Leadership. 

NSC 102— Introduction to Naval Science II 
(2-0-2) 

Winter. 

A study of the organization of the Naval Serv- 
ice, career opportunities, and the duties of a 
Junior Officer in the Naval Service. Students are 
familiarized with the major challenges facing to- 
day's Naval Officer, especially in the areas of 
leadership and human resource management. 

NSC 104 — Naval Ships Systems I 
(Engineering) (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A detailed study of ship characteristics and 
types including ship design, hydrodynamic 
forces, stability, compartmentation, propulsion, 
electrical and auxiliary systems, interior com- 
munications, ship control, and damage control. 
Included are basic concepts of the theory and 
design of steam, gas turbine, and nuclear pro- 
pulsion. Shipboard safety and firefighting are 
also covered. 



236 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NSC 203 — Seapower and Maritime Affairs 
(5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A survey of American Naval and Maritime his- 
tory from the American Revolution to the present 
with emphasis on major developments. Atten- 
tion will be focused on Mahan's geopolitical the- 
ory; the economic and maritime forces; U.S. 
military and maritime strategy; and a compar- 
ative analysis of American and Soviet maritime 
strategies. This course may be taught as a two 
quarter course: NSC 201 (2-0-2) and NSC 202 
(3-0-3). 

NSC 204— Naval Ship Systems II. Weapons 
(5-0-5) 

Winter. 

This course outlines the theory and employ- 
ment of weapons systems. Students explore the 
processes of detection, evaluation, threat anal- 
ysis, weapon selection, delivery, guidance, and 
Naval ordinance. Fire control systems and major 
weapons types are discussed, including ca- 
pabilities and limitations. The facets of com- 
mand, control, and communications are 
explored as a means of weapons system inter- 
gration. 

NSC 301— Basic Sailing I (Classroom) 
(1-1-1) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Student must be a 
certified third class swimmer. (PE Credit) 

A basic foundation course that provides stu- 
dents with the fundamental knowledge and skills 
to be a competent crew member. The course 
covers the basic theory of sailing, nomenclature, 
seamanship, boat equipment and safety, and 
inland waters navigation rules for sailing craft. 
An "A" crew qualification can be issued upon 
completion. 

NSC 302— Intermediate Sailing (On-water) 
(1-3-2) 

Spring. Prerequisites: NSC 301. (PE Credit) 
Basic on-hands sail training leading to qual- 
ification as "B" skipper. Practical skills to be 
mastered consist of rigging and sailing from a 
pier; sail to weather; sail two figure eight courses 
with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard 
maneuver; a capsize; and return to dock and 
secure. 

NSC 304-305— Navigation I & II (3-2-5) 

Fall, Winter sequences. NSC 304 is prereq- 
uisite for NSC 305. 

An in-depth study of piloting and celestial nav- 
igation theory, principles, and procedures. Stu- 



dents learn piloting navigation: the use of charts 
visual and electronic aids and the theory am 
operation of magnetic gyro compasses. Celes 
tial navigation is covered in-depth including th 
celestial coordinate system, and introduction t 
spherical trigonometry, the theory and operatic 
of the sextant. Students develop practical skill 
in both piloting and celestial navigation. Othe 
topics discussed include tides, currents, effect 
of wind and weather, plotting, use of navigatio 
instruments, types and characteristics of elec 
tronic navigation systems. 

NSC 306 Naval Operations (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: NSC 304 and 305. 

A study of the international and inland rule 
of the nautical road, relative-motion vector-ana 
ysis theory, relative motion problems, formatio 
tactics, and ship employment. Also included i 
an introduction to Naval Operations and aspect 
of ship handling, and afloat Naval communicc 
tions. 

NSC 307-308— Evolution of Warfare I & II 
(3-0-3) 

Fall, Winter. 

This course historically traces the develop 
ment of warfare from the dawn of recorded his 
tory to the present, focusing on the impact ( 
major military theorists, strategists, tactician: 
and technological developments. Students a( 
quire a basic sense of strategy, develop an ui 
derstanding of military alternatives, and becorr 
aware of the impact of historical precedent c 
military thought and actions. 

NSC 309— Marine Corps Laboratory (0-3-0] 

Spring. 

A course for Marine Corps Option studer 
which stresses the development of leadershi 
moral, and physical qualifications necessary f 
service as Marine Corps officers. Practical la 
oratory exercises in mission and organization 
the Marine Corps, duties of interior guards, I 
traduction to military tactics, troop leaders!" 
procedures, rifle squad weapons and theory 
physical conditioning program. This cour 
serves to prepare students for the Marine Cor 
Summer Training at Officer Candidate Schc 
(BULLDOG). 

NSC 401-403— Naval Operations Laborato 
I, II, III (0-1-0) 

Fall, Winter, and Spring sequence. 

Practical laboratory exercises conducted in 
dynamic, composite and time oriented fleet el 
vironment to further develop and improve s • 
face warfare skills for Navy Option midshipm*. • 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



237 



ISC 404 — Leadership and Management I 
5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A comprehensive study of the principles and 
oncepts of Institutional Management, Organi- 
ational and Human Behavior, and effective 
:adership. Students will develop additional 
nowledge and practical skills in the areas of 
ommunication theory and practices; Human 
esources Management; Stress Management; 
ounseling; Group Dynamics; and the nature 
nd dynamics of individual and institutional 
hange, human resistance to change and the 
:rategy for implementing change. 

SC 405 — Leadership and Management II 
1-0-3) 

A study of the Management responsibilities of 
junior Naval Officer. The course covers coun- 
eling methods, military justice administration, 
aval human resources management, direc- 
ts and correspondence, naval personnel, 
dministration, material management and main- 
>nance, and supply systems. This course 
uilds on and integrates the professional com- 
etencies developed in prior course work and 
rofessional training. 



NSC 406-407— Amphibious Warfare I & II 
(3-0-3) 

Fall, Winter. 

A historical survey of the development of am- 
phibious doctrine and the conduct of amphibi- 
ous operations. Emphasis is placed on the 
evolution of amphibious warfare in the 20th cen- 
tury, especially during World War II. Present day 
potential and limitations on amphibious opera- 
tions, including the rapid deployment force con- 
cept. 

NSC 450. Naval Drill (0-2-0) 

Introduces students to basic military forma- 
tions, movements, commands, courtesies and 
honors, and provides practice in Unit leadership 
and management. Physical conditioning and 
training are provided to ensure students meet 
Navy/Marine Corps physical fitness standards. 
Successful completion of three quarters of this 
course by NROTC students satisfies this Col- 
lege's six hour Physical Education requirement. 
NSC 450 is required each quarter for all NROTC 
students (450.1 for Freshman and Sophomore; 
450.2 for Junior and Seniors). 



238 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 





I I 




240 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY ROSTERS 



Permanent, Full-Time Members of the 
Teaching Corps or Administrative Staff 

(This list includes only individuals who have 
faculty voting privileges. The number in paren- 
theses after the names represents the initial year 
of employment at Armstrong State College.) 

Adams, Joseph V. (1970) 

Dean of Arts, Sciences and Education 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Alabama 

M.A., Baylor University 

B.A., Tennessee Temple College 

Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

'Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 

Anderson, Donald D. (1966) 

Registrar & Director of Admissions 
Associate Professor of Education 

Ed.D., Auburn University 

M.A., George Peabody College 

B.S., Georgia Southern College 

Anderson, James N. (1985) 

Head of Fine Arts Department 
Associate Professor of Music 

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

M.M., University of Houston 

B.M.E., Wichita State University 

Andrews, Carol M. (1988) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Furman Universtiy 

Arens, Olavi (1974) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
M.A., Columbia University 
A.B., Harvard University 



Babits, Lawrence E. (1981) 

Associate Professor of History and 
Archaeology 
Ph.D., Brown University 
M.A., University of Maryland 
B.A., University of Maryland 

Baker, Julia G. (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Furman University 

Ball, Ardella P. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.S., Atlanta University 
A.B., Fisk University 

Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

"Battiste, Bettye A. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

Bell, Dorothy G. (1969) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.N., Emory University 
B.S.N. Ed., University of Georgia 

*Bell, Eunice A. (1988) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 
M.S.N., Vanderbilt, University 
B.S.N., Vanderbilt, University 

'Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Arkansas 
B.S., University of Dayton 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 
Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
B.S., Georgia State College 
MHS, Armstrong State College 

Brewer, John G. 1968) 

Director of Athletics 
Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., University of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 



'GRADUATE FACULTY 



FACULTY 



241 



Irooks, S. Kent (1976) 

'rofessor of English 

Ph.D., George Washington University 
M.Ph., George Washington University 
M.A., University of Texas 
B.A., University of Texas 

Irower, Moonyean S. (1967) 

associate Professor of Biology 
M.A., University of Massachusetts 
B.S., University of Massachusetts 

Irown, George E. (1972) 

assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 
M.S.S.W., Atlanta University 
B.S.W., Armstrong State College 
A.B., Armstrong State College 

irown, Hugh R. (1968) 

rofessor of English 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
MAT., St. Michael's College 
B.S., Xavier of Ohio 

irown, Sarah (1989) 

assistant Professor of History and Historic 

'reservation 
M.Phil., George Washington University 
M.A., George Washington University 
B.A., Arkansas College 

luck. Joseph A., Ill (1968) 

i 'ice President for Student Affairs and 
Development 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Auburn University 

tuck, Marilyn M. (1974) 

•lead of Baccalaureate Nursing Department 

associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Boston University 

Jurgess, Clifford V. (1979) 

'rofessor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., George Peabody 
A.B., Mercer University 

Burnett, Robert A. (1978) 
'resident 

3 rofessor of History 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Wofford College 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



Butler, Frank A. (1985) 

Vice President and Dean of Faculty 
Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 

B.S.E.S., University of Miami 

Campbell, Michael (1984) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
D.A., Ball State University 
M.A., Trenton State College 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College 

Carpenter, Suzanne (1988) 

Instructor of Chemistry 

M.S., University of North Carolina 

B.S., Auburn University 

A. A., Lake-Sumter Junior College 

Cochran, John H., Jr. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Atlanta University 
B.A., Paine College 

Comaskey, Bernard J. (1966) 

Assistant Professor of History 
M.A., New York University 
B.A., Fordham College 

Connor, Sara E. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Conway, Marian (1987) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., Georgia College 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

Cooksey, Thomas L. (1987) 

Assistant Professor of English and Philosophy 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
M.A., California Polytechnic State University 
B.A., University of California 

Coursey, Teresa (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., West Liberty State College 

'Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Temple University 
B.S.. Millersville State College 



242 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Dennis, Everett J. (1987) 

Director of Library Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.S.L.S., The Catholic University of 

America 

M.A., The American University 

B.A., The University of the South 

Douglass, W. Keith (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

"Duncan, John D. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

B.S., College of Charleston 

Dutko, Kathleen (1978) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.A., New York University 
B.S.N. , Niagara University 

*Ealy, Steven D. (1982) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Claremont Graduate School 
B.A., Furman University 

Echegoyen, Regina N. (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., Universidad de Puerto Rico 

Edenfield, Suzanne (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Findeis, John (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.S., University of Illinois 
B.S., University of Illinois 

Fleming, Caroline (1977) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 
A.S., Midland Technical College 

Ford, Elizabeth J. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Winthrop College 



♦Galloway, Herbert F. (1982) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
M.M., Florida State University 
B.M., Florida State University 

Geoff roy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Westfield State College 

Gibson, Sharyn (1983) 

Director of Radiologic Technologies Program 
Assistant Professor of Radiologic 
Technologies 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., St. Joseph's College 

A. A., Armstrong State College 

'Gross, Jimmie (1967) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.D., Southern Theological 
B.A., Baylor University 

Guillou, Laurent J., Jr. (1970) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Louisiana State University 

'Hansen, John R. (1967) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Troy State College 

Harbin, Mickie S. (1981) 

Associate Professor Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Texas (Arlington) 
M.A., University of Texas (Arlington) 
B.A., University of Texas (Arlington) 

Hardegree, Lester E., Jr. (1982) 

Director of Medical Technology Program 
Assistant Professor of Medical Technology 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Harris, Henry E. (1966) 

Head of Chemistry and Physics Department 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 



'GRADUATE FACULTY 



FACULTY 



243 



irris, Karl D. (1971) 

sistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Tennessee 
B.A., Carson-Newman College 

irris, Robert L. (1981) 

sociate Professor of Music 
D.M.A., University of Washington 
M.M., University of the Pacific 
B.M., University of the Pacific 

rt, Marcel la (1986) 

sistant Professor of Nursing 
M.N., University of Washington 
B.S.N. , St. John College 

rwood, Pamela L. (1985) 

sistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., Auburn University 
M.A., Appalachian State University 
B.S., Appalachian State University 

<uer, Barbara P. (1986) 

itructor of Library Science 
M.L.S., Rutgers University 
B.A.. Vassar College 

-pkinson, Caroline (1989) 

;tructor of Library Science 
ML. IS., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., University of Wisconsin 

idson, Anne L. (1971) 

Messor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 
M.S., Tulane University 
B.A., Hollins College 

idson, Sigmund (1985) 

ofessor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Tulane University 
M.S., Clarkson University 
A.B., Dartmouth College 

ynes, Michael L. (1976) 

i sistant Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Appalachian State University 

nkins, Marvin V. (1968) 

> sistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

>nsen, John G. (1985) 

I sistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Arizona 
B.S , University of Wisconsin 

' ^ADUATE FACULTY 



Jensen, Linda G. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Art 

M.F.A., Memphis State University 
B.A.E., University of Mississippi 

John, Beverly M. (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
M.S.W., Atlanta University 
B.S., Benedict College 

Johnson, Robert D. (1986) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Jones, Gerald A. (1984) 

Assistant Professor of Engineering and 

Physics 

Director of Engineering Studies 
Ph.D., Mississippi State University 
M.S., Mississippi State University 
B.S., Mississippi State University 

Kearnes, John (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Utah 
M.A., Andrews University 
B.A., Union College 

Keller, Carola (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of Virginia 

Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Purdue University 
M.Ed., Washington State University 
B.S., Elizabethtown College 

Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S., University of Tennessee 
(Chattanooga) 

B.S., University of Tennessee 
(Chattanooga) 

Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lanier, Osmos, Jr. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.A., LaGrange College 



244 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., University of Wisconsin 
B.A., Yon Sei University 

Levett, Nettie M. (1975) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Florida A & M University 

'Magnus, Robert E. (1972) 

Director of Administrative Computing 

Professor of Criminal Justice 

Ed.D., Mississippi State University 
M.Ed., Mississippi State University 
B.G.E., University of Omaha 

Martin, Grace B. (1980) 

Head of Psychology Department 
Director of General Studies Program 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Armstrong State College 

Martin, William B. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Duke University 
B.A., Armstrong State College 

Massey, Carole M. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 

Mazzoli, Andrew J. (1981) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.S., Medical University of South 
Carolina 

B.S., State University of New York Medical 
Center 

McManus, William C, Capt. (1987) 

Head of Military Science Department 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.B.A., Auburn University 

*Megathiin, William L. (1971) 

Dean of Academic and 

Enrollment Services 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

'GRADUATE FACULTY 



Miller, Mary (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College of Virginia 

Moore, Richard H. (1988) 

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
B.A., University of Colorado 

Munson, Richard E. (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

Ph.D., Rutgers University 

M.S., Rutgers University 

B.A., Houghton College 

'Murphy, Dennis D. (1981) 

Head of Government Department 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

J.D., University of Florida 

Ph.D., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.A., University of Florida 

Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Noble, David (1969) 

Associate Professor of German and Latin 
Ph.D., McGill University 
A.M., Boston University 
A.B., Boston University 
Diploma Litterarium Latinarum, Pontiflcia 
Universitas Gregoriana 

Nordquist, Richard F. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Leicester 
B.A., State University of New York 

Norsworthy, Gary (1980) 

Dean, Coastal Georgia Center 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., Florida State University 
B.A., Florida State University 

Norwich, Vicki H. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University 



FACULTY 



245 



lefsky, Elliot H. (1971) 

sociate Professor of Psychology 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
Ed.S., Georgia Southern College 
Ed.M., Temple University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Imiotto, Michael J. (1987) 

sociate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
MP. A., City University of New York 
B.S., Mercy College 

tterson, Robert L. (1966) 

jfessor of History 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan 

igel, Allen L. (1969) 

)fessor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.A.T., University of North Carolina 
B.A., University of North Carolina 

Jden, Ethel B. (1985) 

sistant Professor of Nursing 
M.N.. University of South Carolina 
B.S.N. , SUNY - Buffalo 

I 1 jden, George B., Jr., (1982) 

jjsociate Professor of History 
I Ph.D., American University 
I M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
j BA., Wake Forest 

I ymond, Richard (1983) 

hfessor of English 
Ph.D., Miami University 
M.A., University of Wyoming 
B.A., University of Wyoming 

I pella, James F. (1976) 

liian of Health Professions 

bfessor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
B.S.Ed., Temple University 

hee, Steve Y. (1974) 

ofessor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 



RADUATE FACULTY 



Rodgers, Anne T. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Medical Technology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.A.T., University of Massachusetts 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University 

Roesel, Rosalyn L. (1984) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., North Texas State University 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 

Roth, Lorie(1983) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Kent State University 
M.A., kent State University 
B.A., Kent State University 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Ohio University 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Schultz, Lucinda D. (1986) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
DM. A., University of Colorado 
MM., Colorado State University 
B.S., Dickinson State College 

Shipley, Charles (1972) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.A., University of Nebraska 
B.A., University of North Dakota 

Silcox, Elaine (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
B.S.N. , University of Florida 

'Simon, Emma T. (1974) 

Head of Dental Hygiene Department 

Coordinator Health Science 
Program 

Associate Professor of Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M HE., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

'Sims, Roy J. (1955) 

Head of Health Science, Physical Education, 

and Recreation Department 
Professor of Physical Education 

Ed D., Louisiana State University 

M.S.. University of Tennessee 

B S., David Lipscomb College 



246 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, Pamela E. (1987) 

Instructor of Biology 

M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, William J., Jr. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical University of South Carolina 

Stegall, John L. (1981) 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
M.B.A, University of Georgia 
B.S., Indiana State University 

"Stephens, Jacquelyn W. (1979) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Oklahoma 
M.S., Illinois State University 
B.S., Savannah State College 

'Stokes, William W. (1967) 

Assistant Dean of Arts, Sciences, and 

Education 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

B.A., University of Florida 

'Stone, Janet D. (1975) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Purdue University 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Women's College 

Stratton, Cedric (1965) 

Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of London 

Streater, James, Jr. (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Health Science 
Ed.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

*Strozier, Robert I. (1965) 

Head of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 
Arts Department 
Professor of English 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.A., Florida State University 

A.B., University of Georgia 



Suchower, John (1969) 

Assistant Professor of Drama-Speech 
M.A., University of Detroit 
B.A., Fairfield University 

Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Tapp, Lawrence M. (1959) 

Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
M.S., University of Tennessee 
B.S., University of Tennessee 

Thomas, Holly (1986) 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
M.A., Washington State University 
B.S., Montana State University 

Thorne, Francis M. (1965) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Stetson University 

Tilson, Elwin R. (1982) 

Associate Professor of Radiologic 
Technologies 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., San Francisco State University 
B.S., Arizona State University 

*Turnipseed, Patricia H. (1986) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Alabama 
M.A., University of Alabama 
B.A., University of Alabama 

Vogelsang, Kevin (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Music 
M.M., University of Cincinnati 
B.M., University of Cincinnati 

*Warlick, Roger K. (1970) 

Head of History Department 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Boston University 
B.A., Arizona State University 

Welsh, John A., Ill (1967) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Davidson College 



'GRADUATE FACULTY 



FACULTY 



247 



heeler, Ed R. (1987) 

3ad of Mathematics and Computer Science 
?partment 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

B.A., Samford University 

hite, Susan S. (1972) 

isistant Professor of Education 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.S., Winthrop College 

hite, Virginia (1966) 

.sistant Professor of English 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A.T., Emory University 
A.B., Vanderbilt University 

liten, Morris L. (1970) 

Dfessor of Physics 
Ph D , University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

iliiamson, Jane B. (1976) 

sistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B S.N., University of Georgia 

Drthington, Clarke S. (1967) 

lessor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Emory University 
M.A., Northern Illinois University 
B.A., University of Arizona 

3ADUATE FACULTY 



Emeriti Faculty 

Anchors, Lorraine (1954-1983) 

Professor of English Emerita 

Ashmore, Henry L. (1965-1982) 

President Emeritus 

Beecher, Orson (1942-1982) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Boney, Madeline (1967-1982) 

Professor of History Emerita 

Coyle, William (1957-1987) 

Professor of Political Science 
Emeritus 

Davenport, Leslie B., Jr. (1958-1983) 

Professor of Biology Emeritus 

Davis, Lamar W. 

Professor of Business Administration Emeritus 

Gadsden, Ida (1956-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Harmond, Thelma (1963-1981) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Lawson, Cornelia (1972-1987) 

Professor of Education Emerita 

Newman, John (1968-1987) 

Professor of Political Science 
Emeritus 

Pendexter, Hugh III (1965-1983) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Robbins, Paul (1966-1986) 

Professor of Chemistry Emeritus 

Robinson, Aurelia (1972-1986) 

Associate Professor of Education Emerita 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor of Education Emeritus 

Stanfield, Jule (1952-1981) 

Vice President for Business and Finance 
Emerita 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 

Professor of Mathematics Emeritus 



248 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Officers of Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia 

H. Dean Propst Chancellc 

David S. Spence Executive Vice Chancellc 

Henry G. Neal Executive Secretar 

Jacob H. Wamsley Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs/Treasure 

Frederick Branch : Vice Chancellor Facilitie 

Thomas E. Daniel Vice Chancellor External Affair 

Anne Flowers Vice Chancellor Academic Affair 

Arthur Dunning Vice Chancellor Services and Minority Affair 

James B. Mathews Vice Chancellor Information Technolog 

Thomas F. McDonald Vice Chancellor Student Service 

Haskin R. Pounds Vice Chancellor Research and Plannin 

Cathie Mayes Hudson Assistant Vice Chancellor/Plannin 

T. Don Davis Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs/Personn< 

Richard Osburn Assistant Vice Chancellor Academic Affair 

Gordon M. Funk Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs/Accounting Systems and Procedure 

Mary Ann Hickman Asst. Vice Chancellor Affirmative Actio 

H. Guy Jenkins, Jr Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilitie 

Thomas E. Mann Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilitie 

David M. Morgan Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affaii 

Roger Mosshart Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs/Budgel 

J. Pete Silver Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affair 

Joseph H. Szutz Asst. Vice Chancellor Researc 

University System of Georgia 

244 Washington St., S.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334 



Officers of Administration 

Robert A. Burnett •. .Preside 

Frank A. Butler Vice President and Dean of Facul 

John L. Stegall Vice President for Business and Financ 

Joseph A. Buck Vice President for Student Affairs and Developme 

William L. Megathlin Dean, Academic and Enrollment Servici 

Joseph V. Adams Dean, School of Arts, Sciences, and Educatu 

James F. Repella Dean, School of Health Professioi 

Gary F. Norsworthy Dean, Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Educati< 

Donald D. Anderson Registrar and Director of Admissio 

Lynn Benson Director, Counseling Servic 

John Brewer Director, Athlete 

Everett J. Dennis Director, Library Servic 

Bob Fawcett Director, Academic Computing Servic 

Daniel Harrell Director, Finan* 

Al Harris Director, Student Activiti 

Michele Lee Director, College Communicatio 

Robert Magnus Director, Administrative Computing Servic 

R. Wesson Moran Director, Career Planning and Placeme 

Alfred Owens Director, Minority Affairs and Minority Recruitrm 

Len Rozier Director, Plant Operatio 

Ellen Shawe Director, Student Financial Aid and Veterans Affa 

Ellen Struck Director, Personr 

Kim West Assistant Registrar/Assistant Director of Admissio 

Joann Windeler Director, Business Servic ■ 

Virginia White Program Director, Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Educati 







THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 249 


Institutions of the University System of Georgia 




Universities 


lens 30602 




Atlanta 30303 


University of Georgia — h; B,J,M,S,D 




Georgia State University — A.B.J.M.S.D 


anta 30332 




August 30912 


Georgia Institute of Technology — h; 


B,M,D 


Medical College of Georgia — h; A,B,M,D 




Senior 


Colleges 


)any 31705 




Marietta 30061 


Albany State College — h; B.M 




Kennesaw College — A.B 


lericus 31709 




Marietta 30060 


Georgia Southwestern College — h; 


A,B,M,S 


Southern Technical Institute — h; A,B,M 


gusta 30910 




Milledgeville 31061 


Augusta College — A.B.M.S 




Georgia College — h; A,B,M,S 


rrollton 30118 




Morrow 30260 


/Vest Georgia College — h; A.B.M.S 




Clayton State College — A.B 


lumbus 31993 




Savannah 31419 


Columbus College — A.B.M.S 




Armstrong State College — h; A.B.M 


hlonega 30597 




Savannah 31404 


slorth Georgia College — h; A.B.M 




Savannah State College — h; A.B.M 


1 Valley 31030 




Statesboro 30460 


r ort Valley State College — h; A,B,M 




Georgia Southern College — h; A,B,M,S,cD 
Valdosta 31698 

Valdosta State College — h; A,B,M,S,cD 


Two- Year Colleges 


.any 31707 




Douglas 31533 


Darton State College 




South Georgia College — h; A 


anta 30310 




Gainesville 30503 


Atlanta Metropolitan College — A 




Gainesville College — A 


nbridge 31717 




Macon 31297 


Cambridge College — A 




Macon College — A 


-nesville 30204 




Rome 30163 


3ordon College — h; A 




Floyd College — A 


inswick 31523 




Swainsboro 30401 


3runswick College — A 




East Georgia College — A 


chran 31014 




Tifton 31793 


vliddle Georgia College — h; A 




Abraham Baldwin Agri. College — h; A 



Iton 30720 

Dalton College — A 



Waycross 31501 

Waycross College — A 



h — On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Degrees Awarded A — Associate. B — Baccalaureate. 

J luris Doctor, M — Masters. S — Specialist m Education. D — Doctorate 

Doctorate offered in cooperation with a University System university, with degree awarded by the university 



250 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Board of Regents 



Anderson, John, Jr Hawkinsville 

Brown, James Dalton 

Cousins, W. Lamar Marietta 

Divine, William Albany 

Frier, Thomas Douglas 

Gignilliat, Arthur Savannah 

Greene, Joseph Augusta 

McMillan, Elridge Atlanta 



Phillips, Barry Atlar 

Rhodes, Edgar Brem 

Robinson, John, III Americ 

Smith, Deen Day Atlar 

Turner, William B Columb 

Ward, Jackie Atlar 

Yancey, Carolyn Atlar 



Locations of 
Universities 
and Colleges 




INDEX 



251 



Index 



ademic Computing Center 18 

ademic Progress 42 

ademic Regulations (Graduate) 69 

ademic Standing 47 

:elerated Admission Program 27 

meditations 11 

ministrative Officers 248 

missions 22 

Vxelerated Program 27 

Conditional 23 

Early 27 

3eneral Information 22 

Braduate 65 

nternational Students 28 

Provisional 23 

teadmission 26 

teadmission (Graduate) 67 

tegular 22 

Special Catagories 27 

ransfer Students 25 

ransient Students 26 

transient Students (Graduate) 67 

Veterans 28 

'ocational Rehabilitation 28 

nission Requirements to Specific 

grams 28 

>ental Hygiene 31 

>ental Hygiene Education 31 

me Arts 28 

lealth Science 33 

ledical Technology 33 

ursmg (Associate) 29 

ursing (Baccalaureate) 30 

adiologic Technologies 32 

espiratory Therapy 32 

oacher Education 159 

V Its Back to College Program 18 

k isement 46 

S nni Activities 1 1 

V lication Fee 37 

I Sciences and Education 

ichool of) 76 

fc )Ciate Degree 

eneral Requirements 59 

■sties 17 

tf idance 47 

■ ting 48 



Baccalaureate Degree 

General Requirements 58 

Biology Department 79 

Bookstore 18 

Calendar (Academic) inside front cover 

Career Planning 17 

CATES Courses 72 

Chemistry Department 87 

Classification of Students 46 

Coastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 13 

College Preparatory Curriculum 22 

Collegiate Placement Examination 24 

Continuing Education 13 

Cooperative Education Programs 13 

Core Curriculum 53 

Counseling 17 

Course Offerings 

Accounting (SSC) 176 

Anthropology 1 55 

Art 99 

Astronomy 93 

Biology 81 

Botany 83 

Business Administration (SSC) 176 

Business Education (SSC) 176 

Chemistry 89 

Computer Science 150 

Criminal Justice 1 17 

Dental Hygiene 205 

Developmental Studies 230 

Drama/Speech 137 

Economics 119 

Education 

Business 176 

EDN 171 

Exceptional Children 174 

Library Media/Science 175 

Engineering 91 

English 138 

Entomology 84 

Film 141 

French 141 

Geography 122 

Geology 93 

German 141 

Health Education 209 

Health Science 209 



252 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



History 130 

Industrial Arts Education (SSC) 177 

Journalism 143 

Latin 142 

Library Media 175 

Linguistics ■ 143 

Mathematics 147 

Medical Technology 219 

Meteorology 93 

Military Science 233 

Museum and Preservation Studies 128 

Music 101 

Naval ROTC 235 

Nursing 

Associate Degree (NUR) 196 

Baccalaureate Degree (BSN) 199 

Oceanography 93 

Office Administration (SSC) 178 

Philosophy 143 

Physical Education 211 

Physical Science 92 

Physics 93 

Political Science 112 

Psychology 156 

Public Administration 112 

Radiologic Technologies 222 

Reading Skills 231 

Respiratory Therapy 225 

Sociology 158 

Spanish 142 

Study Techniques 231 

Trade and Industrial Education 

(SSC) 179 

Zoology 84 

Courses 

Auditing 48 

Course Load 46 

Dropping 48 

Lettering System for 59 

Numbering System for 59 

Overload 46 

Repeating 48 

Withdrawing from College 48 

Credit by Examination 24 

Cross Enrollment 14 

Dean's List 47 

Degree Programs (Categories) 12 

Cooperative 13 

Dual-Degree 13 

Four- Year 12 

Pre-Professional 12 



School of Arts, Sciences, & Education 

School of Health Professions „ 

Two-Year 

Degree Programs (Requirements of) 

Degree Requirements (Graduate) 

Dental Hygiene Department ; 

Development Activities :.... 

Developmental Studies Department ...; 

Dismissal (Academic) 

Drop/ Add 

Education Department 

Engineering Transfer Program 

Evening Courses 

Expenses(Student) 

Faculty Roster 

Fees 

Financial Aid 

Financial Obligations 

Fine Arts Department 

Food Service '.:.... 

Freshman Experience (Orientation) 

General Studies..., : 

Government Benefits 

Government Department 

Grade Reports 

Graduate Admissions : 

Graduate Admissions Requirements to Specif 

Programs 

Criminal Justice (MS) 

Education (MEd) 

Business Education (MEd) 

Science Education (MEd) 

Health Science (MHS) 

History (MA) 

Mathematics (MEd) 

Graduate Course Offerings 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Criminal Justice 

Computer Science 

Drama/Speech 

Economics 

Education 

Business Education 

Economics Education 



INDEX 



253 



EDN Courses 186 

Exceptional Children (EXC) 190 

Physical Education 217 

English 144 

Film 144 

Geology 95 

Health Education 216 

Health Science 216 

History 130 

Mathematics 153 

Meterology 95 

Museum and Preservation Studies 132 

Nursing 202 

Oceanography 95 

Physical Science 95 

Physics 95 

Political Science 118 

D ublic Administration 118 

Zoology 86 

aduate Degree Coordinators 64 

aduate Degrees 64 

aduate Programs 

Criminal Justice 1 16 

Education 

Business Education 183 

Early Elementary Education 181 

Middle School Education 181 

Science Education 184 

Secondary Education 182 

Social Studies Education 184 

Special Education 185 

English 144 

Health Science 215 

History 129 

Mathematics 152 

lolursing 201 

. 

lalth Science Program 208 

Mory Department 119 

Hory- Government State Requirements 46 

hi tory of the College 10 

Mor Code 49 

Hiors 47 

Hjsing 37 

Halth Professions (School of) 194 



Irrnational Students 
If amurals 



28 

17 



Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 133 

Lettering System for Courses 59 

Library Media Program 170 

Library Services 18 

Location 1 1 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 145 

Mathematics and English Placement 

Tests 58 

MEd Certification Program 73 

Medical Technology Program 218 

Military Science Program 231 

Minority Advisement Program 18 

Naval Science Program 234 

Notice of Fee Change 36 

Numbering System for Courses 59 

Nursing Department (Associate) 194 

Nursing Department (Baccalaureate) 197 

Nursing, Master's Program 201 

Off-Campus Courses 13 

Orientation 16 

Parking Regulations 19 

Physical Education Program 210 

Physical Education Requirements 58 

Placement Services 17 

Placement Tests (English and 

Mathematics) 58 

Political Science 112 

Pre-Professional Programs 12 

Probation (Academic) 47 

Provisional Admission 23 

Psychology Department 154 

Purpose of the College 10 

Purpose of the Graduate Program 64 

Radiologic Technologies Program 221 

Readmission 26 

Readmission (Graduate) 67 

Refunds 38 

Regents' Engineering Transfer 

Program 1 2 



254 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents' Testing Program 57 

Regional Criminal Justice 

Training Center 14 

Registration 

Late Fee 37 

Repeating Courses ...'. 48 

Residency Reclassification 37 

Residency Requirements 36 

Respiratory Therapy Department 224 



Satisfactory Academic Progress 42 

Savannah 11 

Scholarships 40 

Student 

Activities 16 

Government 16 

Organizations 16 

Publications 17 

Study Load 46 

Suspension (Academic) 47 



Teacher Education Programs 160 

Testing 

Collegiate Placement Examination 24 

English and Mathematics 

Placement Tests 58 

Regents' Testing Program 57 

Services 17 

Transfer Students 

Financial Aid 39 

Requirements of Applicants 25 

Transient Students 26 



Veterans 

Admissions 28 

Financial Aid 42 

Vocational Rehabilitation 28 



Withdrawals (Medical) 48 

Withdrawing from College 48 

Writing Center 18 



NOTES 



256 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Armstrong State College Campus Guide 



1. ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 

Academic & Enrollment 

Services 
Admissions 
Alumni Affairs 
Business & Finance 
Coastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 
Counseling & Career Planning 
Financial Aid/Veterans Affairs 
President 
Registrar 
Student Affairs 
Vice President and Dean of 
Faculty 



2. VICTOR HALL 

Adult Education (GED) 
Center for Economic Education 
Criminal Justice Training 

Center 
Dean - Arts, Sciences, & 

Education 
Education 
Ga. Learning Resources System 

(GLRS) 
Psychology 
Speech Clinic 

3. GAMBLE HALL 

History 

Languages, Literature, & 

Dramatic Arts 
Minority Affairs Office 
Writing Center 

4. JENKINS HALL 

Administrative Computing 

Center 
Auditorium 
Institutional Research 



LANE LIBRARY 

A-V Services 
College Archives 
Graphic Arts 

MEMORIAL CENTER 

ANNEX 

Academic Computing Center 

Bookstore 

Developmental Studies 




7. MEMORIAL COLLEGE 
CENTER 

Cafeteria 

Dining Rooms, President & 

Faculty 
Military Science 
Student Activities Office 
Student Government Associatior 
Student Organizations/ 

Publications 

8. HAWES HALL 

Biology 

Math & Computer Science 

9. SOLMS HALL 

Chemistry & Physics 
Government 

1 0. INFORMATION fir 

SECURITY CENTER 

1 1 . FINE ARTS CENTER 

Art Gallery 
Auditorium 
Fine Arts 

12. HEALTH PROFESSIONS 
BUILDING 

A.D. Nursing 

Auditorium 

• B.S. Nursing 

Dean - Health Professions 

Dental Hygiene/Dental Clinic 

Health Science 

Health Careers Opportunities 

Program 
Medical Technology 
Radiologic Technologies 
Respiratory Therapy 

1 3. HEALTH fir PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION BUILDING 

Athletics 

Gymnasium/Pool/Weight Room 
Physical Education 

1 4. PLANT OPERATIONS 

Central Stores 
Mail Room 
Maintenance 

15. TENNIS COURTS/ 
ATHLETIC FIELDS 

16. STUDENT/VISITOR 
PARKING 

17. RESIDENCE CENTER 



Where to Write or Call 

There is a central mail room on campus. Specific information may be obtained by writing to 

the offices listed below and adding: 

Armstrong State College 

11935 Abercorn Street Georgia 

Savannah, GA 31419-1997 (outside Chatham County) Call 1-800-633-2349 



ADMISSION 

Director of Admissions 

927-5277 



HOUSING 
Director of Housing 
927-5269 



ALUMNI 
Alumni Affairs 
927-5264 



OFFICE OF MINORITY AFFAIRS 
Director of Minority Recruitment 
927-5252 



ATHLETICS 
Director of Athletics 
927-5336 



PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Director of College Communications 

927-5263 



BUSINESS MATTERS 

Vice President for Business & Finance 

927-5255 



SECURITY 
Campus Security 
927-5236 



CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 
Director of Career Planning 

and Placement 
927-5269 

CATALOG 

Director of Admissions 

927-5277 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Certification Officer 
927-5279 

TUITION, PAYMENT OF BILLS, REFUNDS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
927-5255 



30NTINUING EDUCATION 
3oastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 
927-5322 

COUNSELING 

Director of Counseling 
327-5269 

"INANCIAL AID, GRANTS, LOANS, 

WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 
Director of Student Financial Aid 
^27-5272 

3ENERAL ACADEMIC AND 

FACULTY MATTERS 
/ice President and Dean of Faculty 
)27-5261 

jIFTS, GRANTS & BEQUESTS 
/ice President for Student 

Affairs & Development 
)27-5271 

GRADUATE STUDY 
Erector of Admissions 
J27-5277 



Special Notice 

The statements set forth in this Catalog are 
for information purposes only and should not 
be construed as the basis of a contract be- 
tween a student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the Catalog will gen- 
erally be applied as stated, Armstrong State 
College reserves the right to change any pro- 
vision listed in this Catalog, including but not 
limited to academic requirements for grad- 
uation, without actual notice to individual stu- 
dents. Every effort will be made to keep 
students advised of any such changes. In- 
formation on changes will be available in the 
Offices of the Registrar, the Vice President 
of Student Affairs, and the academic deans. 
It is especially important that students note 
that it is their responsibility to keep them- 
selves apprised of current graduation re- 
quirements for their particular degree 
program. 

Armstrong State College is an affirmative ac- 
tion equal opportunity education institution 
and does not discriminate on the basis of 
sex, race, age, religion, handicap, or national 
origin in employment, admissions, or activi- 
ties.